Alberto Carvalho

Miami Herald file

Amid worries over stagnant state education funding, the Miami-Dade County School Board is considering a property tax hike to fund teacher raises.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Nearly 10,000 students from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have enrolled in Florida’s public schools since hurricanes Irma and Maria devastated the Caribbean.

Education leaders haven’t yet quantified the financial impact of absorbing them into schools. But it’ll likely take a combination of funding from the state and federal governments to cover the costs.

While visiting a Coconut Grove elementary school late last month, Gov. Rick Scott said the state has reserves that could be used to help.

Charles Trainor, Jr. / Miami Herald

Miami math teacher Dale Adamson filed into his middle school’s auditorium on Friday for what he thought would be a typical assembly. He left with a $25,000 check.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

An elementary school near Liberty City is about to get a new neighbor — not just next door but in the same building.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Lady Gaga is bringing more than just entertainment to Miami this week.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The leader of Miami-Dade County public schools sharply criticized the Trump administration’s immigration policies Tuesday morning during a keynote that sounded like part stump speech, part sermon.

Superintendent Alberto Carvalho delivered an impassioned address opening a bipartisan summit on immigration reform at the University of Miami, relating his own “journey” as a Portuguese immigrant who was once in the U.S. illegally.

It took Miami-Dade County’s school board 30 rounds of voting before a majority agreed on its next chair: Perla Tabares Hantman.

For about an hour of sometimes tense exchanges, the nine-member board struggled over two directions: electing an experienced chief, or providing new opportunities to those who haven’t had a chance to lead. Hantman has already served in the post for nine years cumulatively.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade County Public Schools wants to push back state testing after the district lost seven days of instruction to Hurricane Irma.

In a letter to Education Commissioner Pam Stewart, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho asked if the district could get an extra week before state English language arts and math tests take place this spring. (Read the letter below.)

Pedro Portal/The Miami Herald

Puerto Ricans fleeing the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria have already arrived at Florida’s public schools.

Broward County schools took in 128 hurricane refugees last week, mainly from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Miami-Dade district enrolled 31 from Puerto Rico, in addition to the 16 students from the Keys and two from Texas the district got after Irma and Harvey.

School leaders are preparing for what could be a much bigger influx.

John O'Connor / WLRN

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho has a message for state lawmakers: Rewrite a controversial new charter school law now and avoid a lawsuit later.

Carvalho wrote a letter to Gov. Rick Scott and the Legislature last month requesting a special session before the end of the year to amend H.B. 7069. The massive law that benefits charter schools has triggered threats of legal action from districts around the state, including Miami-Dade.

Miami-Dade, Broward Public Schools Closed Indefinitely After Irma

Sep 11, 2017
Miami Herald

Miami-Dade and Broward public schools will remain closed until further notice due to recovery efforts from Hurricane Irma.

Among the reasons, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said at a press conference Monday that the schools had to undergo safety inspections.

Miami-Dade public schools will almost certainly remain closed through Wednesday, and may stay shuttered until Monday as the system unwinds shelter operations at dozens of schools, cleans up damage and monitors the status of the county’s largest single workforce.

 

“Hello there” - the email started. “There is something you should know about, taking place tomorrow of 12-17-15 - Thursday.”

That was the email message received by the Houston Independent School District. A similar email came into the inboxes of school officials here in South Florida.

The emails threatened to blow up school buildings with pressure cookers bombs.

Hector Gabino / El Neuvo Herald

Miami-Dade school leaders are interested in joining a land deal to build a pro soccer stadium in Little Havana next to Marlins Park that the school district could also use.

The school board told Superintendent Alberto Carvalho Thursday he could join talks between the city of Miami and the team, whose ownership includes former soccer star David Beckham.

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