airlines

A Southwest jetliner was hit with a "pressurization issue in flight," the airline says, resulting in oxygen masks dropping and a warning to ground personnel to have paramedics ready when the plane landed at Dallas Love Field on Saturday night. Four of the 120 passengers said they had ear pain as a result.

Flight 861 was on its way from Denver to Dallas when the crew radioed ahead to ask for help to be waiting for the Boeing 737.

Spirit Airlines Announces In-Flight Wi-Fi

May 11, 2018
Danny Hwang

Airlines struggle with customer satisfaction; late departures and arrivals, lost baggage, and overbooking are chronic headaches for fliers. Budget airlines, offering lower fares for a no-frills flight experience, especially suffer from low customer satisfaction.

Spirit Airlines is one such company seeking to improve the flying experience. It announced plans today to install Wi-Fi on all of its planes by summer of 2019; 97 percent of flight routes will be covered by satellite-based internet connections.

A woman with multiple sclerosis says Delta Air Lines employees tied her to a wheelchair with a blanket when they didn't have a chair that could accommodate her disability, and her son says a supervisor cursed at her as she wept.

The Federal Aviation Administration has ordered inspections of fan blades on some jet engines of the same type as the one that blew apart on a Southwest Airlines flight, causing the death of a passenger and injuring seven others.

Meanwhile, Philadelphia's medical examiner says Jennifer Riordan, who died on the Dallas-bound Boeing 737 flight, was killed by blunt trauma to her head, neck and torso when she was partially blown out a cabin window shattered by engine debris. Federal inspectors say Riordan, 43, was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the accident.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

One person died after a Southwest Airlines plane experienced serious engine trouble Tuesday and was forced to make an emergency landing in Philadelphia. Seven other people on Flight 1380 were injured. It is the first U.S. airline fatality since 2009.

An aviation security official who was fired after dragging a passenger off a United Airlines flight in Chicago last year is suing the airline and his former employer, the Chicago Department of Aviation, charging that he was not adequately trained for such a situation.

James Long was called to the plane in April 2017 after a passenger, Dr. David Dao, refused to give up his seat to a United employee on the Chicago-Louisville, Ky., flight.

The U.S. Department of Transportation released a statement last week announcing it would withdraw a proposed rule that would force airlines to disclose baggage and other fees at the time of ticket purchase. The decision to rescind the yet-to-be-enforced regulation from the Obama administration received heated responses from members of Congress and airline consumer rights organizations.

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The NAACP issued a travel advisory Tuesday night that warned black travelers against flying on American Airlines, citing multiple instances of alleged racial discrimination.

In a written statement, the civil rights organization said it “has been monitoring a pattern of disturbing incidents reported by African-American passengers, specific to American Airlines.”

Another day and another conflict with airline employees goes viral.

AP

Less than a day after skirmishes broke out in Spirit Airlines' Fort Lauderdale terminal because of canceled flights, a federal judge has sided with the carrier and ordered its unionized pilots to stop boycotting flights as part of a labor action.

District Judge William P. Dimitrouleas issued the order Tuesday, saying Spirit likely would win its lawsuit charging that the Airline Pilots Association was engaged in work slowdowns that violated federal law. The union has denied the accusation.

In the wake of recent high profile incidents of customer mistreatment, most notably, the viral video of airport security officers dragging a passenger off a United Airlines plane last month, commercial airlines are scrambling to regain the trust of air travelers.

United Airlines is increasing the amount it will pay passengers who get bumped from overbooked flights to as much as $10,000. That announcement comes after its CEO, Oscar Munoz, called a now-infamous video showing police violently dragging a seated passenger off a full flight earlier this month "horrifying."

"When we read that story, our reaction was, 'Dang, I wish we'd been on that flight,' " says Fay Fishman, a veteran traveler with a love of getting bumped off overbooked flights.

Updated on 4/28 at 1:15 p.m. ET

United Airlines and lawyers for the passenger seen on video being dragged from a United airliner in Chicago say the man has reached "an amicable settlement" with the airline. The terms of the agreement were not announced.

Another nightmare encounter between a passenger and an airline is going viral and sparking an outcry against an industry accused of routinely mistreating its customers.

An American Airlines employee allegedly took a stroller from a woman boarding Flight 591 from San Francisco to Dallas Friday, and knocked her with it while she held a baby in her arms.

A couple flying to Costa Rica for their wedding were removed from a United Airlines flight in Houston on Saturday.

The incident happened nearly a week after a video showing a passenger being dragged off a Chicago-to-Louisville flight went viral.

Michael Hohl and Amber Maxwell are scheduled to get married on Thursday.

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