Nadege Green / WLRN

The Liberty Square housing project in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood is one of the deadliest places in the City of Miami.

This year, in and around the housing project, 43 people have been shot. Seven of them died.

On Thursday night, Congresswoman Frederica Wilson, Miami Commissioner Keon Hardemon, Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey Edmonson and other local officials listened as residents shared their frustrations about the crime.

  This past August, we brought you a series of stories about the violence in Liberty City. Specifically we looked at life after a mass shooting in June that ended with seven injured and two dead.

Our reporter Nadege Green reported and produced the series. After her "Aftermath: Beyond the Bullets in Liberty City" series, I talked with Nadege about the people, attitudes, and challenges that exist in the community. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

Hermana Richardson is returning to the Liberty City street where her son and his best friend were murdered.

It’s been three months since one of the worst mass shooting in Miami’s history. Seven people were injured. Two died.

“Three months they’ve been murdered and we haven’t heard anything yet,” says Richardson.  “They’re not talking about it anymore and I don’t want it to be thrown on a shelf.”

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

Hermana Richardson clutches a grey shirt in her hand. She brings it to her face slowly and inhales.

“All I have is the smell of my son,” she says. “This is the last shirt he had on before he walked out of my house.”

Her son Kevin was killed on June 24 in one of the worst mass shootings in Miami’s history.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Historically, Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood has had a dicey relationship with police. It's where the McDuffie race riots erupted in the 1980s.

In recent years, questionable police shootings further complicated community relations. And a prevalent no-snitch culture means few witnesses will cooperate with police.

Allison Diaz / Miami Herald

Miami Commissioner Keon Hardemon was born and raised in Liberty City.

When he was elected into office eight months ago to represent District 5, Miami’s poorest district, he noted his personal connection to the area in his acceptance speech.

Hardemon, 30, was born in the James E. Scott public-housing  projects in Liberty City to a single mom.

He says he's experienced some of the storylines that come out of the neighborhood first-hand.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Pastor Billy Strange is dressed in a floor-length black robe, his funeral attire.

A silver-blue casket topped with flowers rests near the altar.

Strange’s Mount Calvary Missionary Baptist Church sits just blocks away from the site of a June mass shooting that left seven people injured and two dead.

Strange tells the 100 mourners crowded inside the purple-and-white church he’s going to keep it real.