African-American

Education
4:40 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Ocean Researcher Tells Students Education Is The Key To Their Dreams

Evan Forde presenting at Van E. Blanton Elementary as part of "Back to School Day."
Credit Pattrik Simmons

Evan Forde struggled in school while growing up in Miami-Dade. He got poor grades even though his parents were educators.

Now, he’s one of the few African American oceanographers in the country.

“I wanted to look the children in the eyes, and I wanted them to remember this day. And I wanted them to remember my story,” he said. “I was poorly behaved and a poor student. One day, I woke up thinking I could do whatever I want to do in this world, that I’m here for a reason.”

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Sunshine Economy
3:35 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Interviewing By Eating: 5 Questions for CEO Felecia Hatcher

Credit Tom Hudson

Felecia Hatcher is co-founder and “chief popsicle” of Feverish Pops, a gourmet popsicle company based in Miami. Hatcher says she is “obsessed with desserts” and, as proof of that passion, she points out that she was married at a donut shop in Portland, Oregon.  

Hatcher began the popsicle company after getting fired from her marketing job with Nintendo.

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The Sunshine Economy
6:30 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Doing Business While Black

South Florida business owners: (from top right) Felecia Hatcher of Feverish Pops, Adrian Foster of Foster Construction, Suzan McDowell of Circle of One Marketing and Kevin Michael of Invizio
Credit Tom Hudson

The quartet pictured above own and operate their businesses.  Some may consider them black businesses.  Some may not.  But they all operate in a commerce climate in South Florida that has been partially shaped by an economic boycott 24 years ago. In 1990, South Florida’s tourism industry was boycotted by blacks for three years.

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Anniversary
5:12 pm
Thu December 26, 2013

Richmond Heights, Developed As Community For Black Servicemen, Celebrates 65 Years

FOUNDERS: Early residents of Richmond Heights at a community occasion. Many of the men were World War II veterans and it was their service that neighborhood developer Frank C. Martin, a white man, wanted to honor.
Credit Mona Bethel Jackson

This weekend brings an opportunity to learn something about a southwest-of-Miami community called Richmond Heights.

It's a black neighborhood, always has been. But its founding and the history that developed from its unlikely roots make a good story, and add a pleasant nuance to common ideas about post-war race relations.

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Nelson Mandela
8:10 am
Wed December 11, 2013

The 'Mandela Snub' How I Remember It

Credit South Africa The Good News / Wikimedia Commons

  It was the summer of 1990. I was home, living with my parents, working part-time at a Miami television station as a production assistant. I made an aspiring journalist’s wage, $6 an hour.

A multiracial group of students back at my Washington, D.C., college had staged sit-ins calling for the school to divest from South Africa. I remember campus-wide "reverse apartheid" protest days. We were learning about modern-day, systemic racial segregation.

But in 1990, Nelson Mandela, who'd spent 27 years as a political prisoner, was released.

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News
2:01 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

How To Improve Healthcare For Blacks In South Florida

Medical professionals selected by Legacy Magazine discuss the state of black healthcare in South Florida. Author and speaker Casandra Roache (far left) moderated the panel discussion.
Credit Rachel Morello / WLRN

A panel of the area’s top medical professionals gathered Tuesday to discuss the state of black healthcare in South Florida. The discussion, hosted by Legacy Magazine, addressed medical issues affecting African-Americans, who make up nearly a quarter of the South Florida population.

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Mandela In Miami
5:40 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

How Miami's Shrewd Black Leadership Turned The Mandela Snub To Local Advantage

Credit Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States / Wikimedia Commons

Twenty-three years ago, Nelson Mandela came to Miami, stumbled  into a quagmire of Cuban exile politics, got exploited by racial equality organizers and left South Florida a little better than it was before.

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Museums
2:05 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

PAMM Gets Grant To Acquire More Works From Black Artists

Faith Ringgold’s Black Light Series #1: Big Black (1967) was recently acquired by Pérez Art Museum Miami.
Credit PAMM / Miami Herald

A new donation to Pérez Art Museum Miami will allow the museum, already known for its art from Latin America, to add more works by African-American artists.

The $1 million donation is funded in equal parts by developer Jorge Pérez, whose $40 million gift of cash and art put his name on the new museum, and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. In the last phase of construction, PAMM is scheduled to open in its new waterfront location in early December.

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History
10:55 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Plunging In: How Miami's Beaches Were Integrated

Garth Reeves was a young World War II veteran when he came home to Miami and went to work at his father’s newspaper, the Miami Times.

He bought property, paid taxes and voted in elections. But the beach at Virginia Key was the only one where black residents could go without trouble.

“It wasn’t a very good beach. But right down the street there was Crandon Park - beautiful beach, beautiful clubhouse. Everything was first class.”

So a meeting was arranged with the county commission.

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Urban Beach Weekend
9:40 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Does Miami Beach Need A Reality Check On Racism?

Credit Sammy Mak / WLRN

When WLRN put out a call last week asking Miami Beach residents if they were staying or leaving during Urban Beach Weekend, the overwhelming majority said that they would be leaving until Monday or Tuesday.

Among the most frequently cited reasons for the exodus: a recent history of violence, traffic and noise, along with the event bringing a "bad crowd" into town.

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Education
12:35 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

More Than Half of Black and Hispanic Students Will No Longer Qualify For Bright Futures Scholarships

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 1:08 pm

floridas

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Public Health
10:00 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Poverty, Access Issues Blamed For Poor Health In Broward's Black Communities

BABIES AT RISK: Black residents of Broward County experience higher rates of infant mortality than whites or Hispanics, according to a new Urban League health report.
Credit Kolonoj on thepeoplespoetrycorner.blogspot.com

Black residents of Broward County are much more likely than whites or Hispanics to experience infant mortality, obesity or HIV/AIDS, according to an alarming new report from the Urban League, and nobody should try to blame the results on poor lifestyle choices .

According to the Urban League's Danielle Doss-Brown, it's unarguably the result of poverty and lack of access to insurance and health care. Complicating it is a shortage of sources of healthy food in many black communities.

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