activists

It's been almost four years since Patrisse Khan-Cullors helped birth the hashtag #blacklivesmatter. Those three words gained national attention for demonstrations against police brutality and grew into a movement.

But progress has been slow, admits Khan-Cullors, a Los Angeles-based activist who co-founded the Black Lives Matter Network.

Amanda Rabines

No, election season is not over for Democrats. In fact, judging by the crowds and the speeches at the James L. Knight Center in Miami on Wednesday night, you would think it's in full swing. 

More than 2,000 people showed up to hear Vermont senator and former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, along with chair of the National Democratic Committee Tom Perez, at the latest stop of their "Come Together and Fight Back" tour,  aimed at building activism within the Democratic party. 

Democrats have a long way to go to rebuild their party after brutal losses across the board last November. But they're seeing glimmers of hope in recent and upcoming special elections where they argue the backlash to President Trump is resulting in change at the ballot box.

This weekend, hundreds of thousands of Americans will be taking to the streets — some to celebrate, some to protest the inauguration and others to demonstrate for issues that the president-elect cares about.

If you happen to be one of those people, you might have this nagging question in the back of your mind: Will any of it make a difference?

Kate Stein / WLRN

 

 

Norteño music developed along the Texas-Mexico border. It blends the instruments of mariachi with the rhythms of polka. And now, one of norteño's most popular bands is hoping its music will get more Latinos to the polls.

Los Tigres del Norte -- The Tigers of the North -- have been putting out norteño hits for four decades. The band performed in West Palm Beach on Feb. 19. A lot of its songs touch on social and political issues: immigration, workers' rights, drug trafficking, political representation.

The People's Climate March Takes Miami

Sep 22, 2014
Lisann Ramos

The People’s Climate March Sunday included more than 2,000 events in over 150 countries.  

In Miami, a group of about 100 people spent Sunday afternoon handing out T-shirts, putting on costumes and coloring posters at the Freedom Tower. Many of those posters focused on the effects of sea-level rise.

Jonathan Ullman works with the Sierra Club, one of the organizers of Miami’s march.

nader.org/books/unstoppable

07/07/14 - Monday’s Topical Currents delves into our fractious politics and the need for convergent action if we are to reassert the will of the people. Attorney, author, political activist, and four-time presidential candidate, Ralph Nader has a new book that lays out the path forward.

www.banksy.co.uk

10/07/13 - Monday’s Topical Currents is with political culture professor Michael Stewart Foley.  He’s written FRONT PORCH POLITICS: The Forgotten Heyday of American Activism in the 1970s and 1980s.  Most people remember the 1960s as the decade of activism, but Foley contends the 1970s and 1980s were equally important.

Liz Coursen, americanpostcardart.com

In this digital age, when vacationers to South Florida can grab their smartphones and send jealousy-inducing photos to friends and family within seconds, it’s hard to believe the humble postcard is still hanging in there.

Visit most any local souvenir shop and there they are, usually on one or two racks tucked behind the seashell bracelets and painted coconuts.  But Sarasota author Liz Coursen doesn’t think much of the postcards being sent from Florida these days.

C. DiMattei

If you’re looking for Boynton Beach’s arts district, you won’t find it near any trendy restaurants or high-end boutiques.  Actually, the closest business is an auto shop and the nearest place to grab a bite to eat is a gas station on the corner.

But if no one took this artists’ enclave seriously 18 months ago . . .

“ . . . they do now!” exclaims Rolando Chang Barrero.

ActivistArtistA / Boynton Beach Art District

As one of the key players behind the up-and-coming Boynton Beach Art District (BBAD), artist and gallery owner Rolando Chang Barrero is getting no down time during South Florida's "off season." Barrero is among the region's year-round residents who stick it out during the slow, sultry months to ensure his pet projects make it through to grow another season.

"It's time to get the community to really step it up if we're going to become a year-round arts scene," said Barrero, who owns ActivistArtistA, which serves as something of a launching pad for many of the BBAD projects. 

** Please note this program did not air.

EVol i ART

South Florida artist Virginia Erdie strives to be "a little bit of an activist" with her work. It's fitting, then, that her art has ruffled a few feathers along the way. Her next major installation almost didn't see the light of day.

ActivistArtistA's Facebook

Rolando Chang Barrero is floored by what is happening in the Boynton Beach Arts District, and that's a good thing.

"There is a lot going on," Barrero said.

http://employees.oxy.edu/dreier/

08/08/12 - Wednesday's Topical Currents is a 20th Century “Social Justice Hall of Fame,” compiled by Occidental College professor Peter Dreier.  It chronicles activists, thinkers and politicians who challenged injustice and promoted democracy.  His list of vignettes includes Clarence Darrow, Helen Keller, Noam Chomsky, Studs Terkel . . . and even Bruce Springsteen.