2016 Elections

Updated at 3:08 p.m. ET

Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has not "admitted that there was Spying" on Donald Trump's campaign in 2016.

The former spy baron has been making public appearances all week as part of the tour for his new book, and interviewers have been asking him about the latest news in the Russia imbroglio. President Trump mischaracterized what Clapper said as part of his ongoing political counterattack against federal law enforcement and the intelligence community.

Updated at 2:12 p.m. ET

President Trump intensified his attack on federal law enforcement as he sought to strengthen his case that the FBI's investigation into whether his campaign conspired with Russia actually amounted to unlawful political snooping.

"I hope it's not so, but if it is, there's never been anything like it in the history of our country," the president said Wednesday.

Updated at 11:59 a.m.

The Senate Judiciary Committee released more than 2,500 pages of documents on Wednesday related to its investigation about a meeting in 2016 between top Trump aides and a delegation of Russians who promised to help the campaign.

The material, which includes interview transcripts and other "exhibits," is available here.

Candidates in Mexico's volatile presidential race are scrambling to distance themselves from the disgraced big-data firm Cambridge Analytica.

Peter Haden/WLRN

Palm Beach County prosecutors have dropped a case looking into voter fraud over absentee ballots in a County Commission and state House election last August.

Investigators with the State Attorney's Office found more than 20 fake signatures forged on request forms for absentee ballots. A team of detectives looked into the case over the past year, but could not identify a suspect to accuse. 

As new reports emerge about Russian-backed attempts to hack state and local election systems, U.S. officials are increasingly worried about how vulnerable American elections really are. While the officials say they see no evidence that any votes were tampered with, no one knows for sure.

The Republican Party heads into 2017 with more power than it has had for a long time.

For the Democrats, it's a different matter.

Hillary Clinton's loss in the presidential race and Democratic failures further down the ballot have the party searching for a way forward.

Here are five things Democrats need to do, as they look for a path out of the political wilderness:

1. Be clear about how bad things are — and are not — for the Democratic Party.

JOE RAEDLE / GETTY IMAGES

This week on The Florida Roundup...

2016 was a big year. It played host to a long contentious and historic election with Donald Trump winning the presidency--with a big hand from Florida. 

WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

WLRN's Tom Hudson was live from the Miami Book Fair with a panel of authors from across the state to ponder a future in the age of Trump. 

At his first news conference following his party's shocking loss at the ballot box last week, President Obama appeared to needle Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign for not paying enough attention to rural voters who eventually handed President-elect Donald Trump the upset victory.

"When your team loses, everybody gets deflated, and it's hard, and it's challenging," Obama said. "I think it's a healthy thing for the Democratic Party to go through some reflection."

While America has experienced a peaceful transition between presidents 44 times, there has never been a president-elect quite like Donald Trump.

 

For his supporters, including the 4.6 million Floridians who voted for him, Trump represents a change. Not just a change in which political party controls the White House, but a repudiation of decades of the political class on both sides of the aisle.

 

Reince Priebus once joked about his job as chairman of the Republican National Committee that people assumed he must be miserable. But Priebus said he didn't see it that way. "I'm not pouring Bailey's in my cereal," he told CNN.

Now, as newly named chief of staff to President-elect Donald Trump, Priebus has his work cut out for him.

Priebus will have a large say in hiring West Wing staff, and will "be in charge of day to day operations," he told Fox News on Monday morning. He'll also have the president-elect's ear as a top adviser.

A new WLRN/Univision 23 survey finds Hillary Clinton is viewed better among registered Miami-Dade County voters than she is nationwide and Donald Trump's efforts to appeal to black voters has fallen flat. It also shows Hispanic voters are divided regarding Clinton, but not regarding Trump.

SCROLL DOWN FOR U.S. SENATE RACE RESULTS

Here are the results of the survey for president conducted in English and Spanish of 600 Miami-Dade County registered voters.

justgrimes via Flickr / WLRN

If you are a registered voter in Palm Beach County, then you might want to check your mailbox throughout the month of June. New voter registration cards are being mailed to voters in the county.

 

According to the Sun Sentinel, Palm Beach County wants to avoid problems at the polls that occurred during the last  Presidential Primary.

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