Knight Blog

Photo by Neil de la Flor

The 2013 Miami Performance International Festival obliterates the line between viewers and mid-career and emerging artists from Miami and around the world. In its second year, the festival, curated by Charo Oquet, takes place in Miami’s Design District and the Miami Beach Botanical Garden and runs through the month of June.

Video as an art form has come a long way. Although artists started seriously working with the medium at least a half century ago (some will pinpoint Nam June Paik’s German exhibition in 1963 as its official arrival on the scene), it remained somewhat the stepchild, not getting a lot of respect until the last couple decades. And in Miami, video art – good video art – was late in taking hold with local artists and in shows. That’s changed dramatically in recent years, and yet there have been few outlets dedicated to highlighting the form.

CCEMiami (Centro Cultural Español en Miami), the Spanish cultural arm here, often falls of the radar when it comes to the arts. Since moving into the bustling downtown area on Biscayne Boulevard (from its sometimes forbidding building in the Gables), it may be that some people simply don’t know they are there. Time to rediscover.

The center offers up some impressive and diverse cultural events, including music and theater – the latter includes their innovative Microtheater, “small” plays of about 15 minutes, set up in the back courtyard for only about 15 spectators. 

Live Arts Lab Seeks To Help Mid-Career Artists Advance

May 29, 2013

Longevity in the arts, like any field, requires constant learning. Performance labs provide this space. It’s where artists can experiment, research and refine their skills. In these labs, sometimes new ideas emerge and old ideas are fleshed out. It’s where artists—dancers, choreographers, directors, composers—innovate and hone their craft.

Miami Herald Honors Students With Silver Knight Awards

May 23, 2013
Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald Staff

Many of this year’s Miami Herald Silver Knight winners are well-acquainted with adversity — through their own families’ personal heartaches or the struggles of those living halfway around the world.

But a telling theme emerged Wednesday night at the 55th annual Silver Knight Awards ceremony: Rather than become despondent over life’s unfairness, these high school seniors vowed to make a difference, and that spirit of determination has led to some far-reaching accomplishments.

Karen Rifas and Kerry Phillips have more in common than the first letter of their first names, although at first it might not seem so. Rifas’s work should be familiar to many – in particular her linear, site-specific installations that involve optical illusion and delicate interventions. Her pieces can be found at MAM, MOCA and, until recently, at the Bernice Steinbaum Gallery (which closed last year). Phillips is on the early end of her career, but has also had a lot of recent exposure, at the ArtCenter/South Florida and the Hollywood Arts and Cultural Center, to name a few outlets.

Pavel Antonov

The Miami Theater Center is growing. IFrom the annual contemporary performance SandBox Series to being the new home for Mad Cat Theater Company, MTC has redefined itself as a vibrant center of culture in sleepy Miami Shores.

Art that has been coming out of the urban core is often heavy on portraiture – characters, friends, family portrayed in both raw settings and historical and cultural context – especially in painting, especially from African-American artists. The work of Houston’s Robert Pruitt, currently showing at General Audience Presents up in North Miami, is one such example. But Miami has always lacked a strong black artistic infrastructure, and therefore we haven’t seen much significant work coming out of the community (with some notable exceptions). Enter the up-and-coming T.

The Daniel Lewis Miami Dance Sampler was a mixed bag of performances that introduced audiences to contemporary dance, ballet, new flamenco and traditional African dance forms. The performances, billed as six- to eight-minute samplers, highlighted the scope of dance talent that exists in Miami. Produced by Dance NOW! Miami and Miami Dance Futures, the goal of the sampler is to give local talent exposure and to expose audiences to dance forms that they wouldn’t normally seek out.