conservation

Americas
6:30 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Beloved Brazilian Monkey Clings To A Shrinking Forest

The wild population of the golden lion tamarin, which lives only in Brazil's Atlantic Forest, fell to just 200 in the 1970s. Conservationists have helped the species rebound, but the monkeys are still at risk as development encroaches on their remaining habitat.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:15 am

The tiny, copper-hued golden lion tamarin is so beloved in Brazil that its image graces the country's 20-real bank note. But this lion-maned monkey is in peril.

There's only one place on earth where the golden lion tamarin lives in the wild: in Brazil's Atlantic Forest, or Mata Atlantica, just north of Rio de Janeiro. Deforestation in the region has reduced the monkey's habitat, once a massive ecosystem stretching for a half-million square miles, to just 2 percent of its original size.

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Environment
10:39 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Bald Eagles Are Back In A Big Way — And The Talons Are Out

Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary, and biology graduate student Courtney Turrin, survey eagle behavior along the James River in late-summer.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 8:48 pm

"It's a jungle if you're an eagle right now on the Chesapeake Bay," says Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. "You have to watch your back."

Americans have long imagined their national symbol as a solitary, noble bird soaring on majestic wings. The birds are indeed gorgeous and still soar, but the notion that they are loners is outdated, Watts and other conservationists are finding.

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Environment
2:16 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Why The 'World's Weirdest Bird' Is Ditching South Florida And Heading North

Roseate spoonbills are increasingly ditching South Florida for points north.
Credit Patdaversa / Flickr Creative Commons

The roseate spoonbill -- often mistaken by confused tourists for the non-native flamingo -- is one of Florida's great iconic species. Dubbed "one of the most breathtaking of the world's weirdest birds" by naturalist Roger Tory Peterson, the gangly creatures are an increasingly rare sight in South Florida. 

According to a feature in the May-June issue of Audubon Magazine, spoonbills have been vacating South Florida in droves, heading north to more hospitable (read: often less developed) lands.

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Environment
7:03 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Enjoy Florida's Wetlands Before They Disappear

Wildlife hotspots like Green Cay Nature Center in Boynton Beach are ideal places to mark American Wetlands Month.
Credit Tricia Woolfenden / WLRN

The recently-wrapped 2013 Florida Legislative session was an active one for those who track environmental issues in the Sunshine State.

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Everglades National Park
7:00 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Read About New Boating Guidelines For The Everglades

The public is asked to weigh in on proposed changes to boating regulations inside Everglades National Park.
Credit Tricia Woolfenden / WLRN

Proposed changes at Everglades National Park have put anglers at odds with environmental groups. The park's draft general management plan, which includes several variations (or "alternatives"), is currently up for public comment. This Sunday is the deadline to weigh in on proposed measures, which include prohibiting traditional boating in about one-third of Florida Bay. 

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Aired 3/8/13 on WLRN Channel 17
8:53 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Saving Florida Wildlife

How Do Sharks Feel? Not As Cold As You'd Suspect
6:00 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Here's What It Feels Like To Pet A Live Shark

Writer Tricia Woolfenden performs a nictitating membrane reflex test on a female bull shark during a shark tagging expedition.
Credit Megan Jacobson / Sharktagging.com

When we caught the first shark of the day, I'd already spent a good hour or so turning Neil Hammerschlag's words over in my head, like a gambler might fidget with a lucky coin in his pocket: 

"We might not see any sharks today." 

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