bio

Marice Cohn Band for The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Read The Runners-Up (Amateur)

Mar 18, 2013
Susan Brown

In April, we invited unpublished writers to submit their work as part of our Write South Florida contest.   There were three categories in the contest: Amateur, College, and Children. These are the runners-up from the contest in the Amateur category.

FULL MOON FISH HOUSE

by Susan Brown

I‘ve spent more of my life in water than on land.   Not surprising for a third generation fisherman, I ‘spose.  Probably explains why I jumped at the chance to live in the old fish house.  That, and the fact we got history.

Lorelei Ramirez: College Winner

Mar 18, 2013
Lorelei Ramirez

Lorelei Ramirez was the winner in the College category of Under the Sun‘s unpublished writers competition.

Flagler Street

by Lorelei Ramirez

This is what we’ve got

These

Palm trees

Swaying in the breeze along the

Not the sea or shining sands under the sun but

Swaying

In the middle of streets

Dark paved roads and honking horns and not quite so clean air

Between walking girls and whistling men in dirty white cars

Pickup trucks

And bus

stops.

Read The Runners-Up (College)

Mar 18, 2013
Sadie Kurzban

In April, we invited unpublished writers to submit their work as part of our Write South Florida contest. There were three categories in the contest: Amateur, College, and Children.  These are the runners-up from the contest in the College category.

Mommy the Commie and Me

by Sadie Kurzban

Lindsay Lonano: Kids Winner

Mar 18, 2013

Lindsay Lonano was the winner in the Kids category of Under the Sun‘s unpublished writers competition.

Lindsay Lonano

The Swamp

The green swamp

Bursts open with abundant life.

A slowly moving log appears

Upon the still surface.

Unsuspecting little bird

Unaware a predator lurks.

Munch! Fast moving predator

Eyes atop his head, delighted!

Alas! Not full yet

He slides upon a rabbit.

Prey, gone in a flash

Where did it go. Woe!

Ruth Morris

Books & Books bookstore owner Mitchell Kaplan speaks with award-winning author Edwidge Danticat about her experience as an Haitian immigrant living in Brooklyn, what it’s like to live in Miami now, and about writing the memoir

Ted Grossman

Fifty years ago, North Miami Senior High School students lived in neighborhoods where most kept their doors unlocked at night. They say they felt safe riding their bicycles throughout town – some streets weren’t even paved. Today, many students at the school say they don’t feel safe in their school or their neighborhoods.

North Miami Senior High’s demographics have also changed. In 1960, the segregated school was all white. Today, most students are of Haitian descent. According to the school, 31 out of 2,700 students are white.

Kenny Malone

In December, we originally aired “The Tale of Lot 180.” Producer Kenny Malone searched for the story behind  deceased Udavilla Rutherford’s unclaimed collection of salt shakers, held at the Florida Bureau of Unclaimed Property.

We received this comment from Carolyn Lane about  “The Tale of Lot 180:”

Kenny Malone

A tinker, a tailor, a soldier’s things– his rifle, his boots full of rocks
And this one is for bravery, and this one is for me
And everything’s a dollar in this box.

– Tom Waits

South Florida has long been a retirees’ paradise, and also a final resting place. But when people die, their family doesn’t always show up to gather their belongings.