Tell Me More on Xtra HD

Weekdays at 11:00am
Michel Martin

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners...personal experiences of life-changing travel...the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders...and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground...the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel MartinTell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f4dce1c809b502d2741f|5187f4c7e1c8a450fdefbbd8

Pages

Economy
11:43 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Should Detroit Bail Out By Selling Van Gogh?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, we head to Detroit. We've reported a number of times on the city's serious financial difficulties. The city owes billions of dollars to creditors and the governor of Michigan has appointed an emergency manager to try to settle the city's finances.

Read more
Asia
11:43 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Have Women's Rights Evolved In Pakistan?

When a teenage Pakistani girl accused four men of rape, she was told to stay quiet so she wouldn't bring shame to her family. Instead, she promised to fight all the way to the Supreme Court. Her story is shown in the new Frontline film Outlawed in Pakistan. Host Michel Martin speaks with the filmmakers.

NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

The Science Of Being 'Top Dog'

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 12:13 pm

Some people believe competition is an art, others say it is a skill. A recent book suggests it's neither — and there's actually a science behind winning. Host Michel Martin speaks with authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman about their book, Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing (This interview originally aired on Feb. 25, 2013 on Tell Me More).

NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

The Benefits Of Letting Bygones Be Bygones

Forgiving someone who's done you wrong can be challenging, but learning how to do it can benefit your mind and body. Frederic Luskin of the Stanford Forgiveness Project writes about this in his book, Forgive For Good. He joins host Michel Martin to talk about why learning to forgive is worth it (This interview originally aired on Feb. 22, 2013 on Tell Me More).

NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Forgiveness Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

You've probably heard that forgiveness reduces stress and can provide peace and closure. But Slate advice columnist Emily Yoffe says that's not always true. She tells host Michel Martin that sometimes it's better to cut ties, especially in the case of abusive parents. Psychiatrist Richard Friedman also joins the conversation (This interview originally aired on Mar. 11, 2013 on Tell Me More).

NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Civilian Life Transition Harder For African-American Vets?

For some veterans, the war is not over when they come home. Host Michel Martin speaks with two former servicemen, Benjamin Fleury-Steiner and Leo Dunson, about some of the difficulties African-American veterans face after returning to civilian life.

U.S.
10:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Why Former Gitmo Chief Left In Protest

President Obama is once again calling for the prison at Guantanamo Bay to be shut down, even though new polls suggest most Americans want it to stay open. But the chorus of critics has gained one surprising member: former Guantanamo Chief Prosecutor Morris Davis. Host Michel Martin talks with Davis about why he now feels the facility should be closed.

Food
10:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

A Seat At The Table With The 'Queen Of Creole Cuisine'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Sarah Vaughan, Duke Ellington. That sounds like the guest list of a party you wish you'd been invited to. And in a way, you were, because all of these famous names were regular visitors to one of New Orleans' best loved restaurants.

Read more
Barbershop
10:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Price Too High For Being World's Top Military Force?

President Obama defended his administration's use of drone strikes this week. The Barbershop guys weigh in on that — plus the latest controversy around Tiger Woods, and the Boy Scouts lifting their ban on gay youth. Host Michel Martin speaks with writer Jimi Izrael, civil rights attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports writer Pablo Torre and columnist Jeff Yang.

BackTalk
10:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Famed NY Cop Serpico Calls Out Stop-And-Frisk Defender

Tell Me More host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar crack open the listener inbox. This week, listeners like former NYPD Detective Frank Serpico weigh in on a heated interview about the NYPD's controversial stop-and-frisk policy.

Faith Matters
10:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Minister To Lose Job After Performing Same-Sex Marriage?

When Methodist minister Reverend Thomas Ogletree officiated his son's same-sex marriage, he didn't think it would cause a stir. But now some New York United Methodist Church ministers are threatening to defrock him. He speaks with Host Michel Martin about the controversy and why he feels he's being singled out.

Music Interviews
1:50 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Pitbull Gets 'Epic': 'You Constantly Have To Defend Your Success'

Pitbull's latest album is titled Global Warming, and he voices the character Bufo in the new movie Epic.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 1:30 am

Read more
Arts & Life
12:03 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

HBCU President Asks Dr. Dre, Why Not Us?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Moving on to other news in education, last week hip-hop mogul Dr. Dre and music producer Jimmy Iovine announced that they would be giving the University of Southern California $70 million to create a degree that will blend business, marketing, product development, design and liberal arts.

Read more
Politics
11:32 am
Thu May 23, 2013

CBC Chair Marcia Fudge Wants Caucus To Be Heard On The Hill

Ohio Representative Marcia Fudge is still relatively new on the block. But she's established herself as the new head of the Congressional Black Congress. In the role, she's already been very vocal about whether the President is doing enough for people of color. Host Michel Martin talks with Congresswomen Fudge about her ideas for America.

Education
11:32 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Being Blind To Financial Need: Is It Worth It?

Millions of students rely on loans and grants for their studies. But with universities strapped for cash, fewer schools are able to admit students regardless of their financial need. Host Michel Martin asks the President of Iowa's Grinnell College, Dr. Raynard Kington, why his school considered putting a halt to need-blind admissions.

Pages