Sundial

Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m.

There's no place anywhere else in the country quite like South Florida. From the Keys all the way up t​he​ Palm Beach​es​, WLRN's new daily program Sundial brings you the stories that make our home unique. Interviews about news, politics, music, sports, arts, and food, all with a local twist.

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Today in Sundial: Hollywood commissioners are debating the new names for three streets named after Confederate Gens. Robert E Lee, John Bell Hood and Nathan Bedford Forrest, the grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. What should those new names be? Different people have different ideas. We'll hear from the man who has been fighting to make the change for more than a decade, as well as the current mayor.

Today in Sundial: New World Symphony, in collaboration with MIT Media Lab, and with support from the John S and James L Knight Foundation, is putting together a new show titled Project 305. We spoke with composer Ted Hearne and filmmaker Jonathan David Kane about  the unique sounds and videos they collected from everyday folks to put this symphony together. By the way, one of those sounds includes a dog chasing peacocks.

Miami Herald

Today in Sundial: Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen announced earlier this year that she would not be running for office again in 2018. That brings to an end almost 40 years of public service. The Republican legislator joins us to discuss why she made the choice to end her political career, as well as chiming in about some of the big issues being debated on Capitol Hill.

Miami Herald

Today in Sundial: Miami Beach voters will be picking a new mayor in November. They'll also have to vote on a referendum that could change how business operates on part of Ocean Drive. We'll talk about the ballot and the options voters will have. We also dig into the controversies that have led to the end of Councilman Michael Grieco's political career.

Miami Herald

Today on Sundial: President Donald Trump is going after the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) by ending the subsidies for low-income participants. Trump critics say this will harm the working poor. There are healthcare experts, though, who say this could actually help Florida consumers. The Miami Herald's Daniel Chang will explain what happens next.

Miami Herald

Bees have struggled for years with Colony Collapse Disorder. And there are all sorts of ideas on how to solve it. They include everything from backyard beehives to filling empty lots in cities with hives - even using robot bees

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

Author Edwidge Danticat tackles one of the heaviest topics that underlies so many of her stories, death. We talk to her about her relationship with her mother before her passing, and how that loss impacted her latest book 'The Art of Death.' 

We sit down with ten-year-old Catalina Frias. She was the winner of this year's Chopped Junior on the Food Network. What was it like competing with her sister, handling the pressure of being on television, and her blog 'The Three Forks.'

WALTER MICHOT / Miami Herald

Florida Power & Light spent $3 billion over the past decade to strengthen its lines and power grid. But after Hurricane Irma left millions of FPL customers without power for a week or more, critics are asking what the money accomplished. 

The utility company says that the money was well spent and that the recovery after Irma went far better than the efforts after Hurricane Wilma. We'll hear from the utility on their performance, as well as the Florida Office of Public Counsel, the office created to represent utility consumers.

CARL JUSTE / Miami Herald

Holly Neher is (unofficially) the first female in Florida history to start at quarterback on a high school football team. It's only unofficial because the Florida High School Athletic Association has not been able to confirm it.

In her first game in August, Neher threw a 42-yard touchdown pass, again a first in Florida high school sports.

Constance Jones/WLRN Sundial / WLRN

WLRN reporter Wilson Sayre shares with us what the final hours for Death Row inmate Michael Lambrix will be like, before the state executes him Thursday evening. She also takes us through the changes Florida's death penalty has been through, which are described even more in her project, Cell 1.    

José A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo joins us for a conversation about Puerto Rico, DACA, and the Las Vegas mass shooting - and the need for "sensible gun policy."

Then we hear from Marine Col. Michael Samarov about recovery efforts in Dominica and the Leeward Islands.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

People who call the Florida Keys home will be in recovery mode indefinitely. Monroe County Mayor George Neugent says marketing and advertising campaigns are underway with sights sets on just trying to get back to normal. He says Keys officials expect to have issues with adequate housing for 18 months to two years.

On the upside, WLRN’s Nancy Klingener – a Key West resident – says tourists are back, with some hotels at full occupancy last weekend.

Hear more about the recovery efforts.

Miami Herald

Jim Morin started his art career drawing the cartoons that he enjoyed on Saturday mornings as a kid.

He studied art at Syracuse University and eventually found himself drawing caricatures of dignitaries and political leaders. All of that spun into a long and illustrious career as a political cartoonist with the Miami Herald. Two Pulitzer Prize awards later - the most recent one in 2017 - Morin is enjoying his retirement in Maine. 

Miami Herald

Puerto Ricans on the island are desperate for help following Hurricane Maria. As of this weekend, about 30 percent of the island has telecommunications capabilities; roughly half of supermarkets are open part of the time; and a little more than half of gas stations are pumping. But people need water. They need basic supplies. They need money. 

CNN reports that there are thousands of shipping containers stuck in San Juan's port. Barely 20 percent of truck drivers have returned to work. There's a fuel shortage. Add to that, many roads have not been cleared. 

Miami Herald

Rick Shaw was the voice for tens of thousands of South Florida teens back in the 1960s. For decades that followed, those same teens grew up still listening to Shaw spinning the songs they grew up with. Shaw, whose real name was James Hummell, passed away in mid-September at the age of 78.

WLRN's Joe Johnson had the opportunity to compete against Shaw for years. Johnson worked at Magic 102.7 FM while Shaw was at WAXY 106. Johnson said it was hard to compete against Shaw because of the way he treated people.

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