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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

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Around the Nation
6:42 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Bacon Deodorant: What Will They Come Up With Next?

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

We have bacon soda and baconnaise - that's bacon flavored mayonnaise. But apparently there are no limits to what bacon can be. Now we have bacon deodorant. The Seattle company J&D's Food has produced Power Bacon, a bacon-scented deodorant stick coming out just in time for the holidays. So for the bacon lover in your life, permission to sweat like a pig.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
4:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks Break, To Resume Later This Month

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 am

Negotiators from Iran and a six-nation group are scheduled to resume talks on Iran's nuclear program in 10 days. Talks ended on Saturday after an agreement was not reached on an initial proposal to ease international sanctions against Tehran in return for some restraints on its nuclear program.

Analysis
4:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Since Post-Vietnam Era, Fewer Veterans In Congress

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:35 am

The camaraderie that veterans talk about used to be true in Congress too — partly because many members had served in the military. But today's Congress has very few veterans in its ranks, about 20 percent, compared with more than three-quarters in the post-Vietnam era. What does that number mean politically.

Business
4:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Disposable Underwear Courtesy Of 3D Printer

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:07 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And our last word in business is: underprints.

Shopping anywhere could take a hit if 3D printing really takes off, by allowing users to print products at home.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yes, products like disposable underwear. It's the brain-child of an Israeli couple, whose 3D technology also enables them to print items like bandages or sportswear. Currently, the fabric printers run about $3 million, so maybe too steep for home use just now.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:34 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Seeing Opportunity In A Question: 'Where Are You Really From?'

Alex Sugiura was featured, along with his brother and other mixed-race Americans, in the 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic Magazine in October. The brothers are of Japanese and Eastern European descent, but people often mistake Alex for Hispanic.
Martin Schoeller National Geographic

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 11:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

"Where are you from?"

"No, really, where are you from?"

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Fine Art
3:22 am
Mon November 11, 2013

In 1913, A New York Armory Filled With Art Stunned The Nation

Robert Henri's 1913 Figure in Motion was a realistic, but bold response to Matisse's and Duchamp's nudes.
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, Ill.

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:08 pm

One hundred years ago in New York City, nearly 90,000 people came to see the future of art. The 1913 Armory Show gave America its first look at what avant-garde artists in Europe were doing. Today these artists are in major museums around the world, but in 1913, they were mostly unknown in America.

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Around the Nation
3:21 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Vets-Turned-Firefighters Find Brotherhood, Purpose

Probationary firefighter and veteran Victor Ramos practices driving the fire truck at the 16th Street Firehouse of the North Hudson Regional Fire and Rescue in Union City, N.J.
Melanie Burford for NPR

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 10:04 am

Veteran Chris Delplato wanted to be a firefighter for a long time.

"Ever since I was a little kid — [toy] truck and everything," Delplato says. But he only just got his dream job, after first joining the Navy and serving in the Persian Gulf.

He was hired by New Jersey's North Hudson Fire Department, which has brought on 43 veterans this year.

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Around the Nation
7:25 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Joe Biden Congratulates Wrong Marty Walsh

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. After Marty Walsh was elected mayor of Boston on Tuesday, Vice President Joe Biden called him up with hearty congratulations: You son of a gun, Marty. You did it. Except this Marty Walsh hadn't. The real mayor-elect was celebrating at a fancy hotel. This Marty Walsh was sitting on the couch watching TV with his wife.

Around the Nation
7:18 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Rutgers Course To Explore Springsteen's Biblical References

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

For many fans, listening to Bruce Springsteen can be spiritual, that certainly includes a religion professor at Rutgers University. He's introduced a one credit course exploring religious references in The Boss's songwriting. The professor says it's important to understand the broader context of a writer's work. Some of the Biblical references in the music he says are subtle, others not.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, JESUS WAS AN ONLY SON)

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) Well, Jesus was an only son.

Politics
4:47 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Outside Money Plays Big Role In Va. Race For Governor

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Two of the big winners in Virginia's elections this week were not on the ballot. They actually aren't even Virginians. They are two men who spent more than $2 million each to help elect Democrat Terry McAuliffe as governor.

NPR's Peter Overby reports on the Election Day impact of San Francisco environmentalist Tom Steyer and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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Around the Nation
4:47 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Should TSA Agents Have Broader Law Enforcement Powers?

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Airports around the country will hold a moment of silence this morning to honor Gerardo Hernandez. He was the TSA officer killed a week ago today at Los Angeles International Airport. That shooting is renewing debate over airport security and the role of the TSA. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports.

KIRK SIEGLER, BYLINE: Security at major airports is a web of moving parts, and a tangle of bureaucracies and jurisdictions.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR HORN HONKING)

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Television
4:47 am
Fri November 8, 2013

2 Finalists Vie To Be 'Master Chef Junior'

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tonight, a big moment for a couple of extraordinary chefs. They were originally 24 but after unimaginable cooking challenges, devastating eliminations, and, yes, some tears, the field is down to two. We're talking about the reality cooking show "Master Chef Junior." These contestants were ages eight to 13. Some stood on crates to reach their cooking stations? The two finalists: 12 year old Dara Yu and 13 year old Alexander Weiss. We spoke to them, along with one of the celebrity judges, Joe Bastianich.

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Shots - Health News
3:06 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Persistence Pays Off For Uninsured Alaskan

Hairdresser Lara Imler used to be an accountant. She doesn't miss her old job, except for the insurance.
Annie Feidt

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Despite all the problems with HealthCare.gov, a few dozen Alaskans have managed to enroll in a health plan through the marketplace. Lara Imler is one of them.

Imler, a 37-year-old hair stylist in Anchorage, ditched her office job as an accountant in 2004. She says she loves making people feel better about themselves and is a lot happier cutting hair than she was sitting in front of a computer. But she does miss one big thing about her old job: "I had health insurance, and it was wonderful."

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StoryCorps
3:05 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Sisterly Love: 'I Knew That We Had Each Other'

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:56 am

Ten days after a court verdict found a man guilty of sexual assault, two of his victims — his 14- and 15-year-old nieces — stepped into a StoryCorps booth.

"He was a police officer," the older sister said. "This big SWAT man with all the badges and the uniforms, and he couldn't keep his hands to himself. He sexually assaulted me when no one was around. I felt like I was on pause my whole childhood. A prisoner — dead. And I didn't say a word to anybody for seven years."

Audio produced for Morning Edition by Katie Simon with Jud Esty-Kendall.

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All Tech Considered
3:04 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Third-Graders React To Video Games Tracking Their Play

Ms. James' class at St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School in Washington, D.C. wrote in to Morning Edition with their reactions to a story.
Courtesy of Mary Beth James

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Last week, as part of our kids and technology theme week, Steve Henn wrote about how video game makers are spending more time and money tracking players' behavior.

"As we play games, game designers are running tests on us and our kids. They're asking themselves what can they tweak to make us play just a bit longer," Henn wrote.

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