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Author Interviews
2:01 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Biography Doesn't Hold Back On Darkest Years Of 'The Man In Black'

ABC Television Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

In early 1968, country singer Johnny Cash gave one of the defining performances of his career when he played for inmates at California's Folsom State Prison. Robert Hilburn, a music critic early in his career at the Los Angeles Times, was the only reporter to cover that legendary concert.

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Strange News
6:13 am
Mon October 28, 2013

What Employees Will Say To Get A Sick Day

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Employers do fire workers who use fake excuses to call in sick, but there are still plenty of examples of this adult version of The Dog Ate My Homework, according to a new study released by the website CareerBuilder. Nearly a third of employees reported they've called in sick when they weren't really. Among the imaginative medical excuses: losing false teeth out of the car window or extreme grumpiness from quitting smoking. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
5:11 am
Mon October 28, 2013

New Venezuelan Ministry Focuses On 'Supreme Social Happiness'

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro has not had a great year. After a winning a disputed election, he faces inflation near 50 percent. Supplies of basic goods like toilet paper have run low. But now Maduro is acting. He created a new Vice Ministry of Supreme Social Happiness. It's supposed to coordinate services for the poor. We do not know of the Happiness Ministry will work but it has given a practical benefit, causing people to laugh.

NPR Story
5:05 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Spying Allegations Rock U.S.-German Relations

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:00 am

German officials are scrambling to gather more information and U.S. officials are assessing diplomatic options in the wake of claims that the U.S. National Security Agency has been monitoring German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cellphone for more than a decade. Renee Montagne talks to Tim Naftali of the New America Foundation about America's history of spying and what this recent news means for the U.S. relationship with its European allies.

It's All Politics
4:57 am
Mon October 28, 2013

A Churchill 'Quote' That U.S. Politicians Will Never Surrender

Winston Churchill opens the new headquarters of a Royal Auxiliary Air Force squadron at Croydon in 1948.
Central Press/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 8:28 am

This week, Congress dedicates a new bust of Winston Churchill in the Capitol's Statuary Hall. The sculpture is meant to honor the British statesman's legacy of determination and resolve.

It's also a salute to Churchill's friendship with the United States — summed up in an oft-quoted line that Maine Sen. Angus King used during the recent congressional debt-ceiling debate.

As King put it: "Winston Churchill once famously observed that Americans will always do the right thing, only after they have tried everything else."

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NPR Story
4:57 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Saudi Women Get In Driver's Seat To Protest Ban

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:00 am

Dozens of women in Saudi Arabia drove cars Saturday in open protest against the kingdom's ban on women driving. NPR's Deborah Amos, who has been covering the story, speaks with Steve Inskeep about the outcome and implications of the protest.

NPR Story
4:57 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Influential Musician Lou Reed Dies

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:25 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "SUNDAY MORNING")

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're listening now to some of the music of Lou Reed. He died over the weekend at the age of 71. He was in his mid-20s in 1967 when he released this song called "Sunday Morning" on the album "The Velvet Underground and Nico."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SUNDAY MORNING")

LOU REED: (Singing) Early dawnin', Sunday mornin'...

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Music Interviews
3:43 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Arcade Fire On Its Brand-New Beat

Arcade Fire's new album, Reflektor, comes out Tuesday.
JF Lalonde Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 5:22 pm

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Business
3:42 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Moving In With Manufacturers, Amazon Delivers A New Approach

Faster delivery is the new frontier of Internet competition.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 11:58 am

Amazon's business is built on three basic concepts: faster delivery, greater selection, and cheaper prices.

In service of that, it has built enormous warehouses staffed largely by robots that shuttle around, pulling goods out of bins at remarkable speed. It can take just a matter of minutes to go from order to shipment.

And lately it's pursuing a program where Amazon goes directly into manufacturers and manages their logistics and online retailing.

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Around the Nation
3:41 am
Mon October 28, 2013

The Slow, Uneven Rebuilding After Superstorm Sandy

Samantha Langello and her daughter Alanna, 2, stand in front of their flood-damaged house in Fox Beach on Staten Island, N.Y.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 11:33 am

After Hurricane Sandy, the south shore of Staten Island looked like it had been hit by a tsunami. The storm surge devastated whole neighborhoods suddenly, in a matter of hours. In the year since the storm, some families have been rebuilding their homes and their lives. Others are ready to sell their flood-damaged properties and move on.

Joe Salluzzo lives in a neighborhood called New Dorp Beach, a few blocks from the ocean. He rode out the storm on the second story of his brick bungalow, which he's been repairing himself ever since.

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Strange News
5:50 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Row Over Stilton Could Cause A Stink

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 6:43 am

The British government has told a pub in the village of Stilton that it can't call its cheese Stilton. The name is protected by a law that says true Stilton cheese can come from three specific regions — not Cambridgeshire, where Stilton is located. The pub's landlord is weighing his legal options.

Around the Nation
5:44 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Scottsdale, Ariz., Warms Up To Ice Cream Trucks

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 6:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with the triumph of the ice cream truck. Last week, we told you a Swedish businessman so hated the noise, he drilled holes in the tires of an ice cream truck. Maybe Scottsdale, Arizona will be more receptive. The city lifted a decades-old ice cream truck ban. Dismissing fears of accidents or strangers on the streets, officials gave a license to Sydney Kirsch. She tells The Arizona Republic she will sell ice cream when not studying in high school.

NPR Story
5:37 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Soulless 'Counselor' Is Terminally Bleak

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 6:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. The writer Cormac McCarthy has won a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. He has never written an original screenplay produced until now. That film, "The Counselor," opens this weekend. Kenneth Turan has our review.

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NPR Story
5:37 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Before Sherlock: An Ancient Chinese Sleuth's Enduring Appeal

Hong Kong director Tsui Hark's latest film, Young Detective Dee: Rise of the Sea Dragon, just hit cinemas in Asia.
Sam Yeh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 12:19 pm

The sleuthing exploits of Judge Dee, a character based on a 7th-century Chinese official, are gripping new audiences as new generations of writers, movie directors and storytellers tell his tale and build on his legend.

Judge Dee was cracking tough cases for centuries in China before Sherlock Holmes even got a clue. But perhaps more importantly, his stories continue to inform ordinary Chinese people's understanding of justice and law.

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NPR Story
5:37 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Why We Care More About Losses Than Gains

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 6:43 am

People care more about losing a dollar than gaining a dollar. This ideal, known as loss aversion, has national consequences, too, according to new research. David Greene discusses the phenomenon with NPR's Shankar Vedantam.

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