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NPR Story
5:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Dropcam Lets Owners Keep Tabs On Their Pets

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Doggie Cam.

There has been a lot in the news lately about the Internet and privacy. And now it seems that even pets are under surveillance by owners.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's right. Thanks to a newly-improved smartphone app and device called the Dropcam, pet owners can check in on their furry friends while they're at work or out of town. Through the app, you can not only see your dog, but talk to them through a speaker as well.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Ice And Snow Forced Airlines To Cancel Thousands Of Flights

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So far this winter, lots of snow and ice has forced major U.S. airlines to cancel more than 74,000 flights. At an aviation conference in New York yesterday, top executives of some of the nation's biggest airlines spoke about how those cancellations are affecting business.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: American Airlines said it cancelled 28,000 flights in January and February. Almost as many flights were grounded by United Continental. At Southwest 6,500 flights were cancelled.

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Code Switch
10:11 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Stokely Carmichael, A Philosopher Behind The Black Power Movement

Martin Luther King Jr., shown here with Stokely Carmichael during a voter registration march in Mississippi in 1966, regarded the younger Carmichael as one of the civil rights movement's most promising leaders.
Lynn Pelham Time

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:26 pm

Before he became famous — and infamous — for calling on black power for black people, Stokely Carmichael was better known as a rising young community organizer in the civil rights movement. The tall, handsome philosophy major from Howard University spent summers in the South, working with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as SNCC, to get African-Americans in Alabama and Mississippi registered to vote in the face of tremendous, often violent resistance from segregationists.

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NPR Story
6:48 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Model Cannolo Takes To The Skies In Sicily

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Sicily has joined the space-age.

Amateur scientists have launched the Sicilian Space Program with a homemade spacecraft, a helium balloon, and at the tip of the tiny vessel: a cannollo put the cherry on top.

Well, given the extreme conditions, the clay cannollo, still, cameras filmed the classic cream filled pastry soaring into the stratosphere, capturing a sweet view of the sunrise. One small step for pastry.

Around the Nation
5:09 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Italy's Culture Minister Takes Aim At U.S. Weapons Manufacturer

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

ArmaLite is a weapons manufacturer in Illinois and they're facing an unlikely opponent. His name is Dario Franceschini, he's Italy's culture minister and he's upset about an image from ArmLite's "Work of Art" ad campaign. It shows Michelangelo's David cradling an assault rifle. Franceschini says the ad "offends and infringes on the law."

Research News
4:57 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Military Conflict Decisions: Why Weakness Leads To Aggression

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

From Syria to Afghanistan, to Russia and Ukraine, the United States finds itself confronting some major foreign policy challenges. There are old rivalries and new one testing the limits of the United States.

NPR social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam regularly joins us to talk about matters related to individual and organizational behavior, but today, he's found some new research that's relevant to the way we think about foreign conflicts and he's in our studios. Shankar, welcome back.

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Around the Nation
4:57 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Indiana To Mandate Concussion-Awareness Training

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The National Football League has been confronting questions about head injuries and the danger of concussions among its players. But football is a contact sport beginning at a much younger age, and many states are implementing - or at least considering new policies - to protect student athletes from head injuries.

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Economy
11:39 am
Fri March 7, 2014

February Job Growth Beats Expectations; Jobless Rate Ticks Up

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It was pretty clear that the recent bout of winter weather that many of us have seen was going to have an effect on job growth in February. The question was how much. And it turns out less than expected. That's the message from the government's monthly employment report that's out today. It found that U.S. employers added 175,000 jobs to their payrolls last month. As NPR's John Ydstie reports, it's more than expected.

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Around the Nation
6:55 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Feds Break Up Multi-State Shoplifting Ring

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. A family business in Chicago folded this week because of the Fed. It was a mother father daughter shoplifting ring that went from Maryland to Texas. The family stole millions of dollars worth of retail - Legos, electronics, bags of coffee. They auctioned the items on eBay, making more than four million bucks over the past decade. The tool of their trade - clothing. The family's matriarch had a special black dress outfitted with compartments to stuff stolen goods.

Around the Nation
6:32 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Teen Enlists A Capella Group For Prom Invite

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Spring has not yet sprung but high schoolers are thinking ahead to prom. A Florida teen enlisted the a cappella group Straight No Chaser for his video invite to Megan.

STRAIGHT NO CHASER: (Singing) Let it go. Let it go...

UNIDENTIFIED BOY: Megan, will you go to prom with me?

(APPLAUSE)

WERTHEIMER: He showed the video in class. It's on YouTube. Megan said yes. Heaven knows he tried.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:13 am
Fri March 7, 2014

U.S. Knew Of 'Imminent' Move In Crimea, Top Official Says

Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee last month.
Lauren Victoria Burke AP

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 11:39 am

Senior U.S. officials were warned of imminent Russian military action in Crimea about a week before the troop movements that have sparked a major international crisis over Ukraine, the head of the Defense Intelligence Agency tells NPR.

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Around the Nation
5:02 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Weather Expected To Effect February Jobs Report

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The recent bout of winter weather that many of us have felt has hit the U.S. economy. Winter storms cooled job growth in February. The only question is by how much. Economists, investors and job seekers are looking to today's employment report from the government for an answer. NPR's John Ydstie says their predictions have been dampened by the weather too.

JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: John Sylvia is the top economist for Wells Fargo. His forecast for job growth in February has been pounded down by the weather.

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Business
5:01 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Investors: Oversight Is Needed For Bitcoin To Become Mainstream

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Enzyme David Greene.

Let's return to the saga of bitcoin, the digital currency. Yesterday, "Newsweek" announced that it uncovered bitcoins founding father - but the man they named - Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto - denied it. Just last week, the bitcoin world was rocked by a half billion dollar bank robbery.

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Books
5:00 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Publisher Releases Lullabies From 'Goodnight Moon' Author

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Goodnight stars. Good night air. Good night noises, everywhere.

A woman named Margaret Wise Brown wrote those words. And you probably recognize them. You've probably read them out loud many times. It's from her book, "Goodnight Moon." Margaret Wise Brown died in 1952. But much of what she wrote was never published, including her songs and poems.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Around the Nation
6:53 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Temperatures May Hinder St. Patrick's Day Tradition

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 8:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. It's been a tradition in the Windy City for 50 years. The water in the Chicago River is dyed green for St. Patrick's Day. Only this year some residents have a question: Can you dye ice?

That might be the challenge if the river doesn't thaw in time. Organizers are optimistic - even if it means using a tug boat to break up the ice. I am tempted to believe them. The group that dyes the river and unclogs it - as needed - is the local Plumbers Union.

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