The Florida Roundup

Fridays at noon & Saturdays at 6 AM on WLRN 91.3FM

Each week a panel of journalists from South Florida and around the state discuss the week in news. 

Listeners can join the conversation by:

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South Florida Faces A Costly Sewage Problem

Jan 28, 2018
Las Olas Fort Lauderdale
Wally Gobetz via Flickr / WLRN

From Delray Beach to Virginia Key, South Florida is spending millions of dollars to fix old sewer systems. 

 

Does Miami Have A Chance To Host Amazon HQ2?

Jan 21, 2018
AP

Miami is still in the race. This week Amazon announced the 20 cities on its short list as it decides where to build its second headquarters (HQ2) – a $5-billion investment promising 50,000 high-paying jobs.

Though the final list singles out Miami, the proposal was a regional effort. 

AL DIAZ - MIAMI HERALD

President Donald Trump met with leading lawmakers last week to talk about immigration. According to the Washington Post and other media outlets, Trump asked, "Why do we want all these people from 'shithole countries' coming here?" referring to Haiti, El Salvador and some African nations. 

A state judge says it’s unconstitutional to make Florida women wait to get an abortion while another sex scandal opens the state legislative session. Plus, the political world in Florida and nationwide is on fire over allegations President Donald Trump used an expletive term.


WLRN News / Miami Herald

If you thought the first year of President Trump’s Administration was an unprecedented year in politics, just wait. 

2018 brings with it the midterm election, including the races for Florida governor, the U.S. Senate and House and the expiration of two federal immigration programs — Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Plus, a passenger train service is supposed to get rolling between Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. 

12/29/17: The Year In Review

Dec 29, 2017

A historic Hurricane Irma leads to unprecedented evacuations while charter schools result in big changes and a sexual harassment scandal rocks the state legislature.


WLRN/Miami Herald

A lot has happened in the past 365 days.

A Category 4 hurricane plowed across the Florida Keys. President Obama ended the “wet foot, dry foot” policy for Cubans. The death toll related to Florida's opioid epidemic climbed higher. Venezuela sank further into economic and social chaos.

For the last episode of The Florida Roundup in 2017, editorial page editors from the Miami Herald, the Sun Sentinel and the Palm Beach Post — Nancy Ancrum, Rosemary O’Hara and Rick Christie — sat down with WLRN's Tom Hudson to review the year’s biggest news stories. 

Miami Herald

About 4,700 people died in Puerto Rico in September and October of 2016. A year later, 5,800 people died over that same two-month stretch. Could the difference of 1,100 deaths been caused by Hurricane Maria?

According to the island’s official count, the storm killed 62 people. The Center for Investigative Journalism looked at government data on deaths, trying to get a handle on Maria’s death toll on the island.

A Florida senator quits after news of more bad behavior and big changes could be coming to the shipping industry after the disaster surrounding El Faro. Plus, we have a look at the far-ranging influence of Florida icon Jimmy Buffett.


REUTERS

Two of Florida’s largest counties, Palm Beach and Broward, have started a process that could take opioid drug makers to court for their roles in the opioid crisis. 

Miami Herald

Sexual harassment, abuse and inappropriate behavior are not new, and South Florida itself is not immune. "Abuse isn't an economic issue; it's across the board. In Hispanic culture it is a double whammy: It's a culture of machismo and a culture of silence. It's a deadly combination," says Miami Herald columnist Fabiola Santiago.

M. SPENCER GREEN / AP

There are nearly two million gun licenses in Florida but figuring out exactly how many guns are in the state is a more challenging figure to extract. Florida, like most states, does not require gun owners to register their weapons. 

Bridget O'Brien / WLRN News

This week on a special edition of The Florida Roundup at the Miami Book Fair, WLRN's Tom Hudson spoke with a panel of authors about the changing political and cultural landscape of South Florida.

National Book Award finalist and MacArthur finalist Edwidge Danticat, host of NPR's Full Disclosure Roben Farzad and Dr. Andrew Frank, professor of history at Florida State University took to the stage to discuss everything from uncertainty over immigration to the slow expansion of medical marijuana and the backlash against Confederate symbols scattered across the state. 

This week we’re discussing fighting the opioid crisis at Florida’s pharmacies along with paying claims and paying for cleaning up two months after Hurricane Irma. We also are looking at the opportunity and anxiety of our divided politics. 

Florida Blue Makes A Move To Combat Opioid Addiction

Florida Blue, the state’s biggest health insurer, says it will not cover Oxycontin prescriptions after January 1.

Will this move make a difference in stemming the tide of opioid overdoses?

Wilson Sayre

The effort to put emergency money for food into the pockets and bank accounts of South Florida meant waiting in  lines and in court this week.

D-SNAP is the government program for disaster food assistance. The federal government program returned to the region for three days this week after overwhelming demand last month led to long lines and police shutting down some distribution sites over public safety concerns. 

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