The Florida Roundup

Fridays at noon on WLRN 91.3FM

Each week a panel of journalists from South Florida and around the state discuss the week in news. 

Listeners can join the conversation by:

  • (800) 743-WLRN or (800) 743-9576
  • email
  • post on our Facebook page 
  • tweet @WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

King Tides are a natural, seasonal occurrence when the sun and moon align to pull the tides higher than normal, typically by a couple of feet. But, with sea-level rise caused by climate change, this seasonal event may become a regular occurrence. So, how should we begin preparing for it in South Florida? WLRN's Kate Stein, Miami Herald reporter Jenny Staletovich and Broward County's Chief Climate Resilience Officer Dr. Jennifer Jurado address this concern.

Listen Here:

Rowan Moore Gerety WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

On Thursday, Governor Rick Scott announced that at least five people had contracted the Zika virus in Miami's Little River neighborhood. Now, there's a new Zika zone in the county, between Northwest 79th and 63rd Streets from Northwest 10th Avenue to North Miami Avenue. We get the latest from WLRN's health reporter Sammy Mack

Listen here: 

Rowan Moore Gerety WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup…

Hurricane Matthew is the first Category 5 Atlantic hurricane since Hurricane Felix in 2007. Fortunately, dire predictions for South Florida did not come to pass on Thursday as the storm stayed off shore. We check in with FPL and WLRN's correspondents out in the field to see what the aftermath looks like. 

Associated Press

When San Francisco backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick started his protest against racial inequality and police brutality by taking a knee during the national anthem, he set off a firestorm. 

Since then, players from around the NFL and in other sports have joined in. Four Miami Dolphin players began protesting by taking a knee during the national anthem, led by running back Arian Foster. And it's even made its way to some high school football fields here in South Florida. 


This week on The Florida Roundup: 

How much or how little the state of Florida is  telling the public about the spread of the Zika virus has come under scrutiny. So why are some saying the Florida Department of Health's daily Zika update may not be providing the complete picture? 

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

 This week, there is confusion, fear and anger in Miami Beach -- one of two Miami-Dade county zika transmission hot spots. The cause of the public outcry? The pre-dawn aerial spraying for zika-carrying mosquitoes that began this morning.  Round two of that spraying is set for Sunday.

Fernando Llano AP

  This week, three batches of mosquitoes found in traps in Miami Beach tested positive for Zika. In another important development, the Florida Department of Health admitted  it may take longer for pregnant women to get their Zika test results back. WLRN’s health reporter Sammy Mack fills us in on the latest on the Zika epidemic in South Florida. 

Miami Herald

  This week on The Florida Roundup...

We bring you the latest information on the developing weather in the Caribbean with Meteorologist Jeff Huffman.

Next, a week after Miami Beach is declared a Zika zone, the virus has infected local politics as new cases are found along the Gulf Coast of Florida. Who exactly is in-charge of getting timely information out to the public? Is it the Governor? Is it the Department of Health? WLRN's Sammy Mack and Jenny Staletovich with the Miami Herald join for this segment. 

Listen here: 

Miami Herald

 According to the Governor’s office, five cases of the Zika virus have been identified in Miami Beach. This as the tally of locally transmitted cases hits 36. So, what's new in the effort to find and stop it?

Also, from the U.S. Senate to county hall, early voting has begun for the August 30th primaries. A third party presidential candidate comes to town. And how truthful is this political season?

Logan Riely, TNS

  This week on The Florida Roundup

The number of confirmed locally transmitted Zika cases continued rising this week. As of Thursday, the count was up to 25, but the ‘Zika zone’ in Wynwood shrunk by a few blocks. The fight against the virus has sparked health worries, for sure, as it has also brought criticism that health officials and mosquito control efforts were caught flat-footed despite months of warnings.

Listen here: 

As local cases of Zika virus continue to increase, this  week The Florida Roundup dedicated its full hour to an analysis of the political and economic dimensions of the outbreak of this virus in South Florida.

A square mile of Miami is now the hot zone for Zika and the threat of the virus-carrying mosquitoes. Pregnant women are warned about the neighborhood as aerial spraying begins. Where are the bugs? How big of a threat is Zika? And to whom?

Listen here: 


Local transmission of Zika by mosquitoes has been confirmed in Miami-Dade and Broward County. What does this mean for South Florida residents?

The Environmental Regulation Commission recently voted for new standards for more than 80 different toxic chemicals, some of them carcinogens, and just how much of each we’re going to allow in our water supply. Environmental groups claim we are putting Floridian’s health in danger. We’ll take a closer look at exactly what it is we’re putting in our water.

Listen Below:


The shooting of Charles Kinsey has gathered national attention. He’s a North Miami man, a therapist at a group home, who was shot by North Miami Police, while he was helping a 23-year-old man with severe autism. We look into the investigation and how police are trained to handle people with disabilities.

Also, Thursday evening, a second possible case of non-travel related mosquito-borne Zika infection was reported in south Florida. This time it is in Broward County. State officials were investigating a similar case in Miami-Dade. Are we doing enough to combat Zika?

Associated Press

This week on The Florida Roundup...

Sugar is big business in Florida. And that means millions are going to lawmakers to protect those interests. But, is there a cost - especially to the environment?

Also, how much deeper can the troubles in Venezuela go? Is the country reaching a tipping point?

The algae problem in Lake Okeechobee is so bad it can be seen from space. The massive bloom continues fouling waterways on the Treasure Coast as new money is promised to help, but how would those dollars address the blue-green gunk fouling up waterways?