The Florida Roundup

Fridays at noon on WLRN 91.3FM

Each week a panel of journalists from South Florida and around the state discuss the week in news. 

Listeners can join the conversation by:

  • (800) 743-WLRN or (800) 743-9576
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Kyle Holsten / WLRN

  This week, there is confusion, fear and anger in Miami Beach -- one of two Miami-Dade county zika transmission hot spots. The cause of the public outcry? The pre-dawn aerial spraying for zika-carrying mosquitoes that began this morning.  Round two of that spraying is set for Sunday. WLRN’s Kate Stein and Miami Herald reporter Joey Flechas weigh in. 

Fernando Llano AP

  This week, three batches of mosquitoes found in traps in Miami Beach tested positive for Zika. In another important development, the Florida Department of Health admitted  it may take longer for pregnant women to get their Zika test results back. WLRN’s health reporter Sammy Mack fills us in on the latest on the Zika epidemic in South Florida. 

Miami Herald

  This week on The Florida Roundup...

We bring you the latest information on the developing weather in the Caribbean with Meteorologist Jeff Huffman.

Next, a week after Miami Beach is declared a Zika zone, the virus has infected local politics as new cases are found along the Gulf Coast of Florida. Who exactly is in-charge of getting timely information out to the public? Is it the Governor? Is it the Department of Health? WLRN's Sammy Mack and Jenny Staletovich with the Miami Herald join for this segment. 

Listen here: 

Miami Herald

 According to the Governor’s office, five cases of the Zika virus have been identified in Miami Beach. This as the tally of locally transmitted cases hits 36. So, what's new in the effort to find and stop it?

Also, from the U.S. Senate to county hall, early voting has begun for the August 30th primaries. A third party presidential candidate comes to town. And how truthful is this political season?

As local cases of Zika virus continue to increase, this  week The Florida Roundup dedicated its full hour to an analysis of the political and economic dimensions of the outbreak of this virus in South Florida.

A square mile of Miami is now the hot zone for Zika and the threat of the virus-carrying mosquitoes. Pregnant women are warned about the neighborhood as aerial spraying begins. Where are the bugs? How big of a threat is Zika? And to whom?

Listen here: 

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Local transmission of Zika by mosquitoes has been confirmed in Miami-Dade and Broward County. What does this mean for South Florida residents?

The Environmental Regulation Commission recently voted for new standards for more than 80 different toxic chemicals, some of them carcinogens, and just how much of each we’re going to allow in our water supply. Environmental groups claim we are putting Floridian’s health in danger. We’ll take a closer look at exactly what it is we’re putting in our water.

Listen Below:

flickr

The shooting of Charles Kinsey has gathered national attention. He’s a North Miami man, a therapist at a group home, who was shot by North Miami Police, while he was helping a 23-year-old man with severe autism. We look into the investigation and how police are trained to handle people with disabilities.

Also, Thursday evening, a second possible case of non-travel related mosquito-borne Zika infection was reported in south Florida. This time it is in Broward County. State officials were investigating a similar case in Miami-Dade. Are we doing enough to combat Zika?

Associated Press

This week on The Florida Roundup...

Sugar is big business in Florida. And that means millions are going to lawmakers to protect those interests. But, is there a cost - especially to the environment?

Also, how much deeper can the troubles in Venezuela go? Is the country reaching a tipping point?

The algae problem in Lake Okeechobee is so bad it can be seen from space. The massive bloom continues fouling waterways on the Treasure Coast as new money is promised to help, but how would those dollars address the blue-green gunk fouling up waterways?

Protestors gathered Friday in Stuart near the private land visited by Senator Marco Rubio during his tour viewing areas hit by the algae.
Jill Roberts

This week on The Florida Roundup...

New details are emerging about the horror inside the Pulse nightclub massacre in Orlando. Transcripts of police communications also raise questions about the  law enforcement response. Why is it important to understand the police decisions involved, and what do these records indicate?

Listen here: 

AP

On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a a one sentence ruling announcing, in fact, that it couldn't make a decision on President Obama’s executive action on immigration. The action, signed in 2014, would have granted temporary legal status and work permits to as many as 4 million parents of U.S. citizens who entered the U.S. illegally prior to 2010. For those millions waiting and hoping the court would rule in favor of the executive action, what happens now?

Listen to that discussion below:

The early Sunday morning mass shooting in an Orlando gay nightclub is a story everyone is trying to understand. Violence on this scale, concentrated in one place and perpetrated against private citizens, is difficult to comprehend.But it’s a tragic story that also calls upon our deep-seated nature to confront, figure out and learn from.

This week's Florida Roundup tried to shed some light on key questions that linger in the aftermath of what has been described as the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. 

Ashlyn Grantham/flickr

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is under growing pressure thanks to a three year old, $25 thousand contribution to her political action committee from a nonprofit associated with Donald Trump. The money came as her office was considering whether to join an investigation of fraud allegations at Trump University.

Russ Glasson/flickr

The crown jewel in Donald Trump’s resort hotel portfolio will not play host to a PGA tournament next year. After 54 years, the tournament is getting a new home in Mexico City. Organizers say the World Golf Classic at Trump National Doral is moving south of the border because of sponsorship money, but how did Trump’s politics play into the decision?

Jason Parker/Flickr

The biggest game in sports is coming back to South Florida. The Miami Dolphins will host the Super Bowl in 2020, celebrating a century of the NFL. But is this Miami’s game - or is it South Florida's game? Should the branding leave out Broward County?

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