All Things Considered on WLRN

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In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

With their garish blooms, there's something special about orchids, and in the U.S., no place has more native species than Fakahatchee Strand Preserve. The state park in Southwest Florida was the setting for the 1998 book The Orchid Thief. Scientists there are working to bring back varieties lost through the years to poachers and habitat destruction.

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Shonda Rhimes will be the first to admit she didn't expect to be famous. Hollywood is notoriously uncharitable to writers, but the success of her company ShondaLand — the force behind the ABC top-rated dramas Grey's Anatomy, Scandal and How to Get Away with Murder — has made her a household name.

The World Anti-Doping Agency has found evidence of "deeply rooted culture of cheating" and use of performance-enhancing drugs by Russian athletes and coaches. It is calling for Russia to be suspended from international track events. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with German journalist Hajo Seppelt, who helped break the story.

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Coal Offers Hope For Montana Tribe

Nov 9, 2015
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They sit high on their imported sidesaddles, their ruffled skirts tucked neatly beneath them at a ranch in northern Virginia. Las Amazonas del Dorado — this riding group slated to perform — are preparing for their next ride.

These six women are engaging in the sport of escaramuza, a group riding event performed only by women at Mexican rodeos.

University of Missouri football players have pledged to go on strike until university President Tim Wolfe resigns. They're joining several other student groups criticizing the way he has handled a string of racially charged incidents. Koran Addo, a reporter for the St. Louis Post Dispatch, explains the situation.

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