The Florida Roundup: Special Session Of 'Special Deals' & The Pulse Massacre One Year Later

Jun 11, 2017

This week on The Florida Roundup...

Ahead of last week's three-day special session, the state's top legislative leaders -Gov. Rick Scott, House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Senate President Joe Negron- appeared to have reached an agreement about public spending in the new fiscal year. 

Read more: Gov. Scott Says He Will Sign Budget, Call Special Session

The intent was a re-write of the state budget to include a boost to spending for public schools and money for job incentives and tourism marketing. But that narrative swiftly shifted after Negron claimed that he and Senate Republicans had not been included in the special deal made between the governor and Corcoran. 

The special session did end Friday,  with last-minute deals that included a surprising $50 million for improvements to the Herbert Hoover Dike at Lake Okeechobee. Another unexpected development was the inclusion of a bill to implement medical marijuana.

Yet a question lingers: Big promises for transparency were made ahead of the regular 2017 legislative session by House Speaker Corcoran, who pledged openness and accountability. Yet, talks behind closed door are what led to massive bills on education, for instance, and other important issues. 

Bob Graham, a former U.S. senator and Florida governor, joins the Roundup to discuss the matter of transparency in the tate Legislature.

Plus, we bring in Dara Kam, senior writer for the News Service of Florida, and Sergio Bustos,  senior editor for POLITICO Florida,  for more details on the special session.

Listen here: 

Also, one year after the Pulse nightclub massacre we ask: What happened with LGBTQ protections and gun legislation in Tallahassee?

Read more: Pulse Shows Flaws In Mass Casualty Response

Credit WMFE

From our sister station WMFE in Orlando,  Abe Aboraya and Crystal Chavez along with Paul Owens, opinions editor of The Orlando Sentinel,  join to talk about how the tragedy has brought forth differences in community resources and preparation for such emergencies.

Listen here: