The Florida Roundup: A Litigious Week For The Sunshine State

Jul 7, 2017

This week on The Florida Roundup ...

The state finds itself as a defendant in one lawsuit as well as in another soon-to-come lawsuit. 

We're joined by the Miami Herald's Mary Ellen Klas and Gary Fineout with the Associated Press to discuss a week of legal action in Florida. 

The Broward County Public School Board became the first school district in the state to move forward with plans to challenge Florida's major new education law in court. One of the law's measures allows charter schools to access federal funds traditionally meant for public schools serving large numbers of low income students, among other changes to the state's K-12 educational system. 

  • Education reporter for the Sun-Sentinel, Caitlin McGlade, tells us what the legal action could be and what the district hopes to achieve. 

Also taking the state to task is a man who many believe would like to be the next governor of Florida. Orlando trial attorney John Morgan has been one of the driving forces (and pocketbooks) behind efforts to approve Constitutional amendments to legalize medical marijuana. Amendment 2 succeeded with 71 percent of voters approving the measure last November

But, in a lawsuit, Morgan claims the regulations passed by lawmakers last spring violate the intent of what those voters signed off on. Legislators banned smoking marijuana, but allowed patients to vaporize bud. 

  • Reporter Nick Evans with our sister station WFSU in Tallahassee, discusses the details of the lawsuit. 

In contrast, the state put to rest a more than two-year-long legal battle with the Seminole Tribe of Florida over blackjack tables. The administration of Governor Rick Scott made a deal with the tribe that's expected to bring millions of dollars in gambling revenues for the state. 

Listen here: 

Plus, the state is not the only level of government to find itself party to lawsuits this week. The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida sued Miami-Dade County claiming that Garland Creedle spent an extra night in jail when the county was asked by federal immigration officials to detain him. But, according to the lawsuit, Garland is a U.S. citizen. 

  • Doug Hanks, reporter for the Miami Herald, talks about where this case stems from and why he expects it to end up in Washington. 

Listen here: