Film
4:13 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Directors Of 'Lovelace' On America's First Porn Star

Editor's Note: This film will open at Miami's O Cinema this Friday, August 9, at 7:00 p.m. The radio version of this post and the post itself originally appears on WNYC's The Takeaway.

Actors Peter Sarsgaard and Amanda Seyfried in the film Lovelace.

Today, pornography is as perennial as the grass. Log onto any smartphone or computer or flip through the upper cable channels on your TV, and there it is.

But back in 1972, porn was anything but commonplace. In the early 70s it was relegated to seedy backrooms and adult theaters.

That is until an X-rated film called “Deep Throat” attracted mainstream attention, making its star, Linda Lovelace, a household name.

As America’s first real porn superstar, Lovelace was both celebrated as a symbol of sexual liberation and derided for participating in the objectification of women.

Despite her stardom, Lovelace never set out to be a star. Her back story was much more complicated and, at times, tragic.

The new film, “Lovelace,” starring Amanda Seyfried, tells the story of both her public and private life around the time “Deep Throat” was released. Its directors, Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman explain what went into their new biopic, and how Lovelace's survivors feel about it.

Watch a short video interview with Epstein and Friedman here: