Blogosphere
7:47 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Blog Roundup: Politics, Politics, and Classical Music Politics

The Blog Roundup is a weekly look at noteworthy South Florida blogs and posts:

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio has taken heat from both sides for his English proficiency proposal.
U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio has taken heat from both sides for his English proficiency proposal.

Rubio's Immigration Reform Amendment Flops

Sen. Marco Rubio's amendment  to the immigration reform bill, which mandates English proficiency for those seeking citizenship, is getting attacked from all sides, even his conservative base.

Javier Manjarro at The Shark Tank has more.

Commissioners Seek To Replace Nighttime Storefront Shutters With Impact-Resistant Glass

City commissioners addressed the pressing issue of shutters in Miami and Coconut Grove. Yes, the issue of nighttime storefront shutters has finally been addressed.

The goal is to replace the unattractive shutters with impact-resistant glass windows, which some say will make sidewalks better-lit and safer.

Blogger Tom Falco has details at the Coconut Grove Grapevine.

Plans For The All Aboard Rail Project Linking South, Central Florida Previewed 

Tired of dealing with road rage, traffic and just basically driving any vehicle in Miami at any time of day? Blogger Matthew Toro has some good news for you.

He shows plans for a new Miami Train Station to connect South Florida to Central Florida and an expanded public transport system for the downtown area at Transit Miami.

Toro hopes the expansion of rail and new station will "do the trick for this lifeless, barren sea-of-asphalt section of downtown."

Miami Dade Commissioner Lynda Bell's Husband Runs For Office

Mark Bell is following in his wife's footsteps and campaigning to be the next mayor of Homestead.

Blogger Elaine de Valle, "Ladra" at Political Cortadito, suspects that Bell waited for this opportune moment to announce his candidacy: when news of Mayor Bateman's possible ethical lapses broke.

Chamber Music Society of Miami Takes Over Mainly Mozart Festival

The newly-formed society hopes to expand the annual spring concert series both musically and geographically.

The festival was previously run by the Miami Music Project.

The last concert of the series will mark the transition and serve as a preview of the future.

Lawrence Budmen at the South Florida Classical Review discusses the transition and reviews the last performance under the Miami Music Project's direction.