Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continues her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

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Guns
1:24 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Mayors' Hands Tied When It Comes To Backyard Gun Ranges

Credit Bar Jack/Flickr

On Monday, Sunrise Mayor Mike Ryan released a series of letters between him, Gov. Rick Scott and Attorney General Pam Bondi, in which he questions the logic of a state law preventing municipalities from implementing their own gun controls.

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Homeless
3:17 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

It's Done: Changes To Pottinger Settlement Approved

Changes to Pottinger settlement have been approved.
Credit Wilson Sayre

Protecting the rights of Miami's Homeless since 1998, Federal Judge Federico Moreno has approved changes to the Pottinger settlement. The revisions were reached through mediation between the city of Miami and the ACLU.

Moreno commented before giving his final ruling that this was a different type of class-action suit because it was not about money. Instead, the question at stake is "how do we help people also also help the community grow," he said.

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Boxing
12:27 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Fifty Years Ago, Miami Made Muhammad Ali

Liston and Clay trade jabs.
HistoryMiami

Before basketball, the sport to behold in Miami was boxing. That love of sport captured the imagination well beyond the sunny sands and palm trees. Fifty years ago this week, Charles "Sonny" Liston fought Cassius Clay for the World Heavyweight Championship at the South Beach Convention Center.

The beloved 22-year-old boxer from the 5th St. Gym stepped into this fight as Cassius Clay and people say he emerged as Muhammad Ali.

Go back in time, put on your best outfit and take your place beside the ring:

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News
3:48 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado May Have Mixed Up His Numbers

Credit Phillip Pessar/Flickr

In our If I Were Mayor interview with Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado, we asked him a few questions about the state of homelessness in the area.

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Art
3:12 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Local Artist Denounces Ai Weiwei Pot Smasher

The vase on the right with the green top half was destroyed this weekend.
Credit Perez Art Museum Miami

The news about the smashed pot at the Perez Art Museum Miami has now reached as far as France, China and even Romania. The green-and-peach pot created by Ai Weiwei as part of a 16-pot installation has been valued by the museum at $1 million.

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StateImpact Florida
10:13 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Marco Rubio Wants To Change College

There was a protest outside the hall where Rubio spoke.
Credit Wilson Sayre / WLRN

When Sen. Marco Rubio was growing up, his parents gave him an edict:

“From a very early age they used to tell us, ‘tu tienes que estudiar,’ which means, ‘you have to study.’ So growing up I don’t ever recall not considering going to college,” Rubio told an audience at Miami Dade College on Monday.

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Living
7:42 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Miami-Dade Homeless-Count Tallies 350 More Than Last Year

There are more homeless people living in Miami-Dade County than before.
Credit Wilson Sayre

After a night-long count a few weeks ago, Miami-Dade County has just released the newest numbers. In total, 4,156 homeless people live in Miami-Dade County. Eight-hundred and forty people are living on the street, about the same as previous counts.

But this census also tallies the number of homeless sleeping in shelters, in hotels and transitional housing. That number is 3,316, about 200 more than in August and 353 more than last year. Most of those people were in hotels or motels, placed there as part of a program designed for struggling families.

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Living Wage
5:42 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

South Florida Wages Not Growing Very Quickly

Wage growth in South Florida is tapering off.
Credit Creative commons courtesy of Flickr user Images_of_Money

Workers wages and salaries grew 2.4 percent over the past 12 months. That's down from 2.6-percent growth half a year ago. Which not only means there has not been a lot of growth, but that what we have had is slowing.

On top of that, total compensation, which includes things like salaries plus health benefits and bonuses, has not been growing at a comparable rate.

As the wage growth slows, other costs of living like housing, food and transportation continues to rise at a much higher rate--putting more pressure on peoples’ pockets.

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How Much Is Enough?
12:50 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Here's What It Takes To Make Ends Meet In South Florida

Should the contents of this, or similar, grocery carts be used to determine the poverty line?
Credit Wilson Sayre

According to the federal government, "enough" is a simple, five-figure amount: $23,850. That's the poverty line. It marks a distinction between who is poor and who is not, who doesn’t have enough money to make ends meet and who does.

But over the past month, I've asked you to tell me what you think it really takes to live in South Florida. Your answers averaged about $47,600 a year -- almost exactly twice the federal poverty level.

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Farm Bill
7:09 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

Food Stamp Cuts Won't Hurt South Florida Too Badly

One of the first U.S. food stamps.
Credit Library of Congress

The U.S. House of Representative voted Wednesday to approve a new farm bill after a two-year standoff. It cuts $8 billion over the next decade from the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, also known as food stamps, but the brunt of those cuts won’t be felt in South Florida.

The food stamp program accounts for almost 80 percent of the current farm bill. With pressure to reduce spending, it was inevitable that the program would be scaled back.

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How Much Is Enough?
8:24 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

Pay For Pretty Peppers -- Farmers Will Donate The Ugly Ones

For lower-income families, fresh produce can be prohibitively expensive.
Credit Wilson Sayre

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one in seven South Floridians can't afford the food they need to stay healthy.

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South Florida crimes
7:23 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Domestic Violence Or Human Trafficking? The State Is Just Learning To Tell

Credit Creative Commons via Flickr user d'n'c

Katherine Fernandez Rundle, State Attorney for Miami-Dade County, says she had never heard of any criminal cases involving human-trafficking victims in Miami.

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How Much Is Enough?
8:39 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Riding The Bus Is Cheaper Than Driving. Isn't It?

The view from inside the 120 bus en route to South Beach.
Credit Wilson Sayre

On the surface, taking public transportation in South Florida is unquestionably cheaper than driving.

But there are hidden costs associated with a commute, stemming from the amount of time behind a wheel or sitting on a bus, and the value of your time in both financial and immaterial terms.

I wanted to find out: At what point is it more valuable to drive than to take public transportation?

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How Much Is Enough & MLK
6:36 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

MLK: A Bootless Man Cannot Lift Himself By His Bootstraps

Rev. Martin Luther King delivering his 'I Have a Dream' speech in 1963, as captured by photographer Bob Adelman, who tells us about being there that day and shooting this photo.
Credit Bob Adelman

Today, Florida’s poverty rate is just over 17 percent and the city of Miami’s hit 29.5 percent in the most recent Census data. At the end of the 1960s, poverty levels in the South hovered around 18 percent of the population.

It was during that time when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spent much of his energy organizing what he called the "Poor People's Campaign." It worked to achieve economic justice and equality for poor people -- a disproportionate number of whom were black.

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How Much Is Enough?
5:35 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

How Many Renters Are In Your Neighborhood? These Apps Will Tell You

City Data's housing map.

Something about housing stats in particular seems a bit more voyeuristic than say, just the average age of a neighborhood's residents. Housing numbers create a figurative window into people’s private spheres that is a bit uncomfortable at times, but the stats help visualize in a different way the place we call home.

Here's a list of websites that map different aspects of Miami's housing market:

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