Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

The end is in sight for the construction at the new science museum in downtown Miami.

The Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science is set to open in the summer of 2016 after closing the doors  this summer at its old location next to Vizcaya. 

Doug Smith / Florida Department of Corrections

Update 10/29/2015 11:55 p.m. -- Jerry Correll was pronounced dead at 7:36 p.m. Thursday night, ten minutes after the execution procedure began. He had no final words, but prison officials say his last meal consisted of a cheeseburger with ketchup, fried, and a Coke.

The U.S. Supreme Court handed down an official denial of Correll's petition to stay the execution at 6:40 p.m. - after the execution was scheduled to begin, which delayed the proceedings.

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Creative Commons via Flickr / danielvalle5 (https://flic.kr/p/a17DDB)

The shooting of Corey Jones in Palm Beach Gardens is the  most recent in a growing number of deaths at the hands of police officers in South Florida and throughout the United States. One of the many conversations prompted by these deaths is how officers systemically interact with and treat men and women of color in the community.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Wynwood is known for its world-renowned street art, but this month it has also been the temporary home of influential museum art in the form of etchings from Pablo Picasso in a show called La Tauromaquia.

Hanging inside the Bakehouse Art Complex, the 26 pieces look like black and white watercolor paintings—they’re actually etchings printed on paper—and depict a scene from a bullfight.

Windows Lost To Wilma

Oct 26, 2015
Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

Before Hurricane Wilma hit Miami 10 years ago,  the tall buildings in Brickell had never had to contend with anything like the more than 100 mph winds the storm brought.

And while the buildings survived, their windows did not fare as well. Broken glass became one of lasting symbols of Wilma’s destruction.

The morning after Wilma made landfall, Santi Gabino left his apartment near Dadeland to go to work at the Four Seasons Hotel in Brickell. On the way in, he thought about picking up a cup of coffee and a donut.

Doug Smith / Florida Department of Corrections

Florida was in the spotlight again for its death penalty procedure this week when the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments about the way the Sunshine State hands down death sentences.

In Florida, Alabama and Delaware, juries can recommend the death penalty if more than half the jurors agree; In other states, either the jury decision has to be  unanimous or  a jury isn't used at all in sentencing.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Manatee season starts in November and there will be one more member in the herd swimming the waters around Fort Lauderdale.

A 500-lb. manatee named Piper, roughly a year old, was released back into the wild Wednesday by the crew who rescued and cared for her.

Piper was named for the pipes she swam through, getting stuck in a concrete pump drain near downtown Fort Lauderdale, where was found in May.

tallahassee.com

App-based taxi services like Uber and Lyft are back in business in Broward County.

In a meeting much shorter than the last one on this issue, commissioners voted 6-2 on an ordinance that opens pathways for the apps to come back online for Broward residents.

Representatives from Uber said they could turn the app back on as soon as Thursday.

Broward County Mayor Tim Ryan says this is a win for residents.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

 Tuesday marked a victory for many workers at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport after the Broward County Commission voted in favor of raises for wheelchair pushers, cabin cleaners and others.

These airport workers work for companies that contract with the airlines, not the county, so have not been covered by the Broward living wage ordinance until now.

Starting Jan. 1, workers will make at least $11.68 an hour if they’re getting health benefits and $13.20 if not. That’s the same as what all Broward County employees earn.

Paid For Your Plastic

Oct 6, 2015
Wilson Sayre / WLRN

About half of the junk Floridians left out on the curb in 2013 went into landfills, the other half was either incinerated or recycled. But the state would like to see less trash headed to dumps—just 25 percent—by 2020. So counties and cities have been trying to figure out how to get people to recycle more and trash less.

One of those experiments has been playing out in Hollywood for the past five years, and it  has turned recycling into a game.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Kathryn Decker (https://flic.kr/p/9yMfuF)

Update 10/6/2015 5:15 p.m. - This measure passed in an 8-4 vote.

People who have been to jail may soon find it easier to get a job with Miami-Dade County.

The controversial law that would take questions about criminal history off county job applications is up for final debate at Tuesday’s commission meeting.

Creative Commons via Flickr / r2hox (https://flic.kr/p/gdMrKi)

More data may be coming to Miami-Dade County residents.

The county commission will take a look at a resolution Tuesday that would try to make county numbers and information more accessible to the public.

Right now, if someone wants information on county housing inventory or wages, that person has to make a request, go record by record and make their own spreadsheet. But Miami-Dade County is trying to make it so that more data is stored online in a format that is  easy to use and understand.

    Becoming an adult holds the promise of new freedoms -- no curfew, driving, maybe living on your own -- but as everyone who has been a teenager knows, it comes with more responsibility, financial responsibilities in particular, whether you are ready or not.

For the first time, WLRN led a summer program teaching six high schoolers how to tell their own stories through sound. Working with them provided unique insights into what they’re thinking about their economic futures -- a future that is statistically challenging.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Volkswagen has now admitted that it misled everyone by equipping about 11 million diesel cars with a device to cheat emissions tests.

Lisa Lowrance owns one of those cars—a 2013 Black Volkswagen Beetle TDI—and has filed a class action lawsuit in federal court in Florida against the German-based car company.

Lowrance bought the car after a long search for an eco-friendly vehicle that didn’t compromise on performance. Like the rest of the world, she found out her car was not  eco-friendly when the story broke online and in the news.

There's only a few more weeks until open enrollment begins for healthcare plans on the federal Health Insurance Marketplace, also called Obamacare.

An estimated 22 percent of Miami-Dade County residents were uninsured last year, making Miami the second most uninsured metro area in the country.

In a speech at Howard University, Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell identified Miami as one of the fed’s target areas going into this third year of the health insurance enrollment.

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