Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Creative Commons via Flickr / Phil Hilfiker (https://flic.kr/p/ziW5x)

South Florida commuters are wasting a lot of time stuck in snarled traffic.

That’s probably not a big surprise, but the area does not make the top ten list for the most gridlocked commute times according to the 2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard from the Texas Transportation Institute.

These most recent numbers put the average time a South Floridian spends languishing in traffic at 52 hours. That’s an hour increase from the previous year and has increased since 2010. 

South Florida is ranked 12th overall for the worst commuter traffic.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Today the city of Hollywood started tearing down a homeless shelter that has long been thought of as an “eyesore.”

The COSAC Quarters Hotel for the Poor has been a controversial feature on the city’s section of Federal Highway since Homeless Voice founder Sean Cononie bought the former inn in 2002.

Opponents contend the shelter was antithetical to the city's efforts to clean up that part of Hollywood, near 1203 N. Federal Highway.

Suzanne Mast / Courtesy

Haulover Beach is known as a place to abandon clothing while having fun in the sun but the nude beach is now extending its welcome to dogs.

The beach is expanding the visiting options for canines from three days a week to seven, an exciting prospect for Pepper and her owner Kelly Newman.

 

Creative Commons via Flickr / scoutnurse (https://flic.kr/p/6fMyz3)

The Coconut Creek Police Department has had a rocky year dealing with the fallout of two cases involving its police officers, but it looks like the department will be getting some new leadership in the coming months.

Coconut Creek’s former chief of police, Michael Mann, was forced to step down from his role in March amid controversy. The city hopes to replace him with the top man in Punta Gorda's Police Department.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

This holiday weekend is forecast to be a scorcher -- temperatures will hang in the lower 90s. Under a blistering sun, the cool blue water at the pool in Virrick Park might prove to be particularly inviting and, as of Friday, is also free.

A swimming race involving several local commissioners raised $5,000, enough to waive the $1.00 fee for kids and seniors and $3.00 for adults at this one pool for the entire summer.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Representatives from a host of local, state and federal law enforcement law enforcement agencies gathered in the sanctuary of Antioch Baptist Church in Miami Gardens Tuesday night for the first of a series of community meetings about the aftermath of police shootings in Miami-Dade County.

The Miami-Dade State Attorney’s office, the U.S. Department of Justice, Florida Department of Law Enforcement and several police departments took part in the effort to help explain the process of investigating and eventually prosecuting those cases.

Florida Department of Corrections

Florida’s lethal injection procedure is constitutional according to a decision out Monday from the U.S. Supreme Court, the final day of decisions for this term.

The Glossip case challenged the use of one drug in the lethal injection procedure in Oklahoma, but Florida is the only other state that uses virtually the same means to execute death row inmates.

 

Creative Commons via Flickr / Jeff Cubina (https://flic.kr/p/tbJue)

In a 6-3 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the use of subsidies to buy health insurance on the federal health care marketplace, Healthcare.gov.

The central question was whether residents of Florida and 33 other states should be allowed to use their subsidies on an exchange their state did not set up for itself.

Florida Department of Corrections

Over the last several years, European drug manufacturers have tried to limit the use of their products in lethal injection executions. As a result, death penalty states were left scrambling to find replacements.

In 2013, Florida began using a new drug called midazolam that is now the subject of a U.S. Supreme Court case: Glossip v. Gross. The state, which has one of the most active active death chambers, has halted all executions for the past six months awaiting a decision on the case.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Pete Jordan (https://flic.kr/p/c3STn3)

This year, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken on a litany of big cases with far-reaching implications especially for Floridians. Here are some things you need to know about how several upcoming decisions will affect the Sunshine State.

Pages