Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Creative Commons via Flickr / r2hox (https://flic.kr/p/gdMrKi)

More data may be coming to Miami-Dade County residents.

The county commission will take a look at a resolution Tuesday that would try to make county numbers and information more accessible to the public.

Right now, if someone wants information on county housing inventory or wages, that person has to make a request, go record by record and make their own spreadsheet. But Miami-Dade County is trying to make it so that more data is stored online in a format that is  easy to use and understand.

    Becoming an adult holds the promise of new freedoms -- no curfew, driving, maybe living on your own -- but as everyone who has been a teenager knows, it comes with more responsibility, financial responsibilities in particular, whether you are ready or not.

For the first time, WLRN led a summer program teaching six high schoolers how to tell their own stories through sound. Working with them provided unique insights into what they’re thinking about their economic futures -- a future that is statistically challenging.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Volkswagen has now admitted that it misled everyone by equipping about 11 million diesel cars with a device to cheat emissions tests.

Lisa Lowrance owns one of those cars—a 2013 Black Volkswagen Beetle TDI—and has filed a class action lawsuit in federal court in Florida against the German-based car company.

Lowrance bought the car after a long search for an eco-friendly vehicle that didn’t compromise on performance. Like the rest of the world, she found out her car was not  eco-friendly when the story broke online and in the news.

There's only a few more weeks until open enrollment begins for healthcare plans on the federal Health Insurance Marketplace, also called Obamacare.

An estimated 22 percent of Miami-Dade County residents were uninsured last year, making Miami the second most uninsured metro area in the country.

In a speech at Howard University, Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell identified Miami as one of the fed’s target areas going into this third year of the health insurance enrollment.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Maarten Visser (https://flic.kr/p/9C1JUP)

Many of the lowest paid workers at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International airport have moved one step closer to what’s considered a “living wage” in Broward County.

For the past several years,  workers like baggage handlers, skycaps and wheelchair assistants at the airport have been fighting to be covered by the Broward County living wage ordinance,  which would bring minimum wages to $11.68 for workers with health benefits and $13.20 for workers without.

  The South Florida housing market is on the mend, according to the latest foreclosure numbers from RealtyTrac. The numbers paint a bright road for future homeowners, but don't mean much for those under foreclosure now.

Miami saw the second highest foreclosure rate among the 20 largest metro areas in August, averaging one foreclosure filing for every 568 housing units.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

  Five-year-old Brian Eberhardt sits watching cartoons at gate D7 at Miami International Airport.

But he’s not watching them on a phone, a tablet or even the television hanging from the ceiling. The cartoons are being projected from an old-school, 16mm reel-to-reel projector.

“It looks like a camera off a TV,” says Brian, who has never seen anything like the projector in real life.

The machine lights up a portable projection screen with Goofy and Donald Duck episodes from the 1950s.

Wilson Sayre

For many beach-goers, lifeguards only exist inside the tiny towers that dot the beach and in their memories of Baywatch episodes.

So what lifeguards (or ocean rescuers) actually do isn't widely understood.

Here are five misconceptions about lifeguards for you below:

1. This is a summer job for college kids.

Wilson Sayre

Ending a 55-year run, the front doors of the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science were locked to the public for good Sunday at it’s location next to Vizcaya.

Outgrowing two previous locations, the building first opened its doors on three acres of land from the Vizcaya estate in 1960.

Six years later, the state-of-the-art Space Transit Planetarium started transporting kids of all ages into the universe. At least one of those kids grew up to be a NASA Astronaut clocking 24 days in space.

Creative Commons

With a large aging population, Florida is an epicenter of Alzheimer’s cases in the United States. Roughly half a million people in the state live with the disease and by 2025, that number is projected to increase by 44 percent.

Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach and University of Florida Health just got 1.5 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health to run the only full-time Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in the state to try and combat these numbers.

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