Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continues her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways To Connect

Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

Science innovators got a challenge today as the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science announced a new innovation fellowship it will offer starting in 2016. Two will be offered the first year: one for an invention to restore coral reefs and the other to help reduce people’s exposure to carcinogens.

The winner will get $100,000 to support the 12- to 18-month fellowship.

The money is part of a $1 million gift from Ted Caplow, CEO of Caplow Applied Science or CappSci, who has served various roles at the science museum in the past three years.

Timmy Gunz / Creative Commons/Flickr

Getting an appointment with a doctor may get a lot harder over the next ten years, according to a study out this week.

The report, commissioned by the Teaching Hospital Council of Florida and the Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida, says Florida is facing a troubling shortage of specialist doctors - to the tune of almost 7,000. Even though South Florida has a number of teaching hospitals, the survey finds the region will still feel the crunch, especially in Palm Beach County.

Illustration by Wilson Sayre

Early in the morning on September 8, 1993, Uwe Rakebrand and his wife, Kathrin, are driving from the Miami airport to a hotel on Miami Beach in their rented red Toyota Corolla. They have just arrived from Germany on a belated honeymoon.

As they approach I-95, the couple's car is bumped from behind. Kathrin had just read a crime brochure explaining what to do in this very type of situation, and Uwe follows its advice: Don’t pull over, it might be a robber.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Official U.S. Navy Page (https://flic.kr/p/9CyM5K)

Fort Lauderdale will not be getting a new mayor this year. Two-term incumbent Jack Seiler has won his third, and final, three-year term in office.

His landslide victory, with 71 percent of the vote, may mean a media storm has passed for Seiler.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Some surprising results have come out of the most recent homeless counts in Miami-Dade and Monroe counties, results of which were released Thursday.

Across the two southernmost counties, a significant number of homeless have moved from shelters to living on the street.

In Dade, the total number of homeless people remained about the same as 2014– 4,152, down from 4,156 in 2014 — but the number of people living on the street as opposed to in shelters has increased by about 200 people.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has awarded Florida $84.3 million to support homeless services and housing facilities across the state.

Nationwide, HUD gave $1.8 billion, making Florida the sixth-largest recipient, trailing New York and California.

The funds will go to support what’s called the continuum of care -- a group of coordinated services that a homeless person moves through as he or she goes from the streets or shelters into some sort of permanent housing and ultimately, self-sufficiency.

By the end of January, all four South Florida counties will have conducted their yearly homeless counts as required by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The numbers help local homeless initiatives figure out where to put their resources and if there have been any major shifts in the demographics of its homeless population.

Jim Fischer / Flickr CC

Volunteers will go out late Thursday night to count the number of homeless people living on the streets of Miami-Dade County. Many of the 840 tallied last year are the hardest to help because they’ve been homeless for so long.

But the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust has implemented a new tool members think could put a serious dent in the number of street homeless going forward. It’s called the VISPDAT, the Vulnerability Index Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Health care advocates gathered across Florida today — in Orlando, Tampa, Tallahassee, and Miami — calling on the state to accept federal funds and expand its Medicaid program.

A handful of people gathered in outside the Stephen P. Clark Government Center in Miami, several with big black circles painted under their eyes, making them appear sickly. Others wore face masks with slogans like “no coverage equals death” written on them.

StockMonkeys / Wikimedia (stockmonkeys.com)

After nearly a decade-long fight, a federal judge ruled that Florida’s Medicaid program violates several federal laws when it comes to healthcare for children.

Judge Adalberto Jordan found the care provided through the insurance program for the poor failed to “promote quality of care or equal access” for kids.

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