Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continues her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

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Hard To Hire
3:46 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Felons, Drop-Outs And The Poor: Broward Wants To Hire You

The Broward County Commission is trying to help out hard-to-hire people.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user 401(K) 2013

Felons, high-school dropouts and the poor might get a helping hand when looking for a job in Broward County.

The County Commission is considering an ordinance that would require contractors to try and give half of those new contract-related jobs to hard-to-hire people.

"Try" is the operative word.

The ordinance would not require contractors to actually hire these people. They just have to make a good faith effort to find someone who falls into the hard-to-hire category. 

 

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Miami Herald
3:13 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Miami Herald Has A New President And Publisher

Alex Villoch is the first woman to fill the position of publisher of the MIami Herald Media Company in its 110-year history.
Credit C.M. GUERRERO / EL NUEVO HERALD

The Miami Herald Media Company has a new president and publisher—and it didn't have to look too far. Alexandra Villoch, currently Senior Vice President for advertising, will start her new role on April 14th. The announcement was made to a receptive room mostly comprised of Herald employees.

Villoch is the first woman to fill the role in the company's 110-year history.

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Sea-Level Rise
10:40 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Why Sea-Level Rise Might Hurt Poor Neighborhoods More Than Coastal Areas

Some lower-income neighborhoods may be more vulnerable to the impacts of rising seas than coastal areas.
Credit Keren Bolter

Keren Bolter is a doctoral student of geosciences at Florida Atlantic University researching what areas in South Florida are particularly threatened by rising seas. She says all methods of analysis for the risks of sea-level rise only focus on financial vulnerability -- ranking Fort Lauderdale Beach and Miami Beach as high-risk -- but to her, that's not the whole story.

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Government
3:47 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Your Garage Sale Might Be Illegal

Yard sales in Miami must be permitted, but the city commission hopes making the permits free will encourage code compliance.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Mike Mozart

Weekends, of course, are prime time for garage sales. But it may surprise you that the sale must have a permit, otherwise it’s illegal.

The Miami City Commission voted Thursday to remove the $28.50 fee the permits used to cost, in the hopes that more people will toe the line.

Permitting for garage sales is nothing new; Coral Gables, North Miami, Ft. Lauderdale and Hollywood also require permitting.

In Miami you’re allowed up to 2 garage sales per year. But if you owe any fines because of code violations, you’ll have to settle up before a permit can be issued.

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Building Code
4:45 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

North Miami Bands Together For Housing Sweeps

North Miami is hoping its new team's "building inspection sweeps" will streamline code enforcement.
Credit City of North Miami

The North Miami Police Department, code enforcement teams and even parks and recreation are joining forces in what are being called “building inspection sweeps.” The city says going in together as a team helps streamline code enforcement.

Three months ago, the roof of an apartment building in North Miami collapsed, displacing over 250 people from their homes. Though that was not the impetus for creating this coalition, city representatives said they learned from the accident.

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Electronic Dance Music
9:58 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Waiting For The Drop: The Anatomy Of An EDM Song

This week people from around the world have come to Miami for Ultra and Winter Music Conference—all in the name of electronic dance music, or EDM.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Tony Nungaray

Ultra Music Festival and Winter Music Conference bring to Miami the beats and bass of electronic dance music, or EDM. But if you don't get what all the noise is about, here we bring you an explainer, and below that, a short tutorial on making the beats so many are crazed for.

HOW TO MAKE ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC:

1. You start off with a simple four-beat bass drum. This is the basic head-nodding element.

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Living
3:45 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Miami's Poor Not So Segregated

Miami turns out to be one of the least segregated metro areas in the country.
Credit Illustration: Wilson Sayre, Photo: Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

Out of 51 large metro areas examined by The Atlantic Cities, Miami ranks 46th most segregated  by poverty. In other words, the city made the study's "least segregated" list.

The Atlantic Cities looked at 2010 Census data to determine if the poor were concentrated in pockets or sprinkled around a city. The study mentioned Miami's abundance of service-industry jobs as a possible explanation for the level of segregation of the poor.

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Soccer (or Football)
3:12 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Beckham Wants PortMiami

Renderings for Beckham's proposed stadium in PortMiami.
Credit Miami Beckham United

It’s official: David Beckham’s Major League Soccer group has announced it wants to build its stadium on the southwest corner of PortMiami. But there are concerns the road to complete the stadium in that location might be a bit congested.

With a view of the Miami skyline, the current conception of the stadium has about 24,000 seats. Which, for some downtown residents and port officials, equals cars -- a lot more cars.

But David Beckham’s real-estate advisor John Alschuler hoped to quell some of those concerns at a press conference Monday.

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Film
2:39 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Under The Dome With Buckminster Fuller This Saturday

Buckminster Fuller with his Montreal World Fair's Dome.
Magnum Photos

Saturday, the MDC Live Arts series will present the live documentary "The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller." It's a live doc because director Sam Green will live narrate the presentation while indie-rock band Yo La Tengo will lend its musical notes to the score.

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Jobs
5:30 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Miami Fast-Food Workers Protest Their Low Wages

Credit Tax Credits/ Flickr

Tuesday morning was one of the few times fast-food workers publicly protested lower wages in Miami, joining the dozens of cities that hosted protesters back in December. The protest coincided with the release of a new study from FIU's Research Institute of Social and Economic Policy which, among other things, looks at the intersection of low-paying jobs and wage theft.

Wilson Sayre went to the protest:

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Homeless
7:45 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Britto Meters Still Confuse Drivers, Passersby

Stephen Sawitz with one of his "Britto meters" in the parking lot of Joe's Stone Crab.
Credit Wilson Sayre

It’s a cool Saturday night and Anthony Rolle pulls his blue Infiniti into the parking lot at Joe’s Stone Crab on South Beach, where he’s headed for dinner. He gets out and drops a quarter into the meter in front of his space.

Rolle starts to look a little puzzled. The meter is painted bright yellow with hearts, flowers and cozy-looking houses. This is not a normal parking meter. It's not actually a parking meter at all.

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Real Estate
6:24 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Want To Buy A Prison? You're In Luck

The prison might make a nice renovation project for the right person.
Credit Creative Commons via WikiCommons / Illustration by Wilson Sayre

UPDATE 6/2/2014: The City of Pembrook Pines has won their bid for the empty prison. Mayor Frank Ortis says the City wanted to control what happened with the land which is not far from houses that fall within city limits.

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A 66-acre plot of land off Sheridan Street has excellent security features, and it will soon be on the market. The Broward County Correctional Institution, a former women’s prison, is being sold off by the state.

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Transportation
2:56 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

More Cheeks On Seats Of South Florida's Public Transit

More people are riding on South Florida's public transportation.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user interbeat

A new ridership report from the American Public Transportation Association says overall, more people are using public transportation in South Florida than last year, specifically in Miami, West Palm Beach, and Pompano Beach.

In Miami, bus and MetroMover numbers were up from last year. Way up was the MetroRail ridership, which increased by 10 percent.

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News
7:13 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

The Haitian Women Of Miami Celebrate 21 Years Of Advocacy

Haitian flag painted by Serge Toussaint on a Little Haiti convenience store.
Credit Creative Commons via Serge Toussaint

Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami (FANM), also known as the Haitian Women of Miami, will celebrate its 21st anniversary on Saturday. The organization, founded by Marleine Bastien, continues to be an influential organization within the Haitian community in Miami. Its work, though, includes advocacy efforts on behalf of Haitians far beyond Miami.

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Schools
4:11 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Miami-Dade Students Aren't Eating Their Free Breakfasts

A new study says low-income students aren't taking advantage of free breakfasts.
Credit Creative Commons via Bob Nichols / USDA

For years, public schools have offered free breakfast and lunch to kids from low-income families. But a new study says only a fraction of those who get their free lunch are eating their free breakfast. In Miami-Dade County, for every 100 students who get free lunch, only 41 are taking advantage of the morning meal.

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