Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Mike Ray/flickr

More than 70% of Florida voters gave their support to constitutional Amendment 2, allowing the use of medical marijuana for debilitating conditions in the state. Backers of Amendment 1 did not have the same luck: the proposal failed to reach the 60 percent of support required for it to pass.

Creative Commons Via Flickr
BasicGov (https://flic.kr/p/75SL1P)

Can the city of Miami sue big banks that issued its residents predatory housing loans?

That question landed lawyers for the city of Miami in front of the Unites States Supreme Court Tuesday, making their case that before the Great Recession banks gave predatory loans to black and Latino residents in violation of the Fair Housing Act, costing the city money.

South Florida was one of the hardest hit areas during the recession and Miami wants to recoup some of its losses, filing suit in 2013.

Associated Press

Miami’s Janet Reno,  the first woman to be United States attorney general, died Monday at 78 from complications connected to Parkinson’s disease.

Her eight-year tenure in that office brought some of the country's most high-profile issues to her desk including the seizure and return of Elián González to Cuba, the capture of the Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski and the 51-day Waco siege standoff in which 76 people died.

While we have spent months talking about races for president, senate or mayor in some cases, if you take a closer look at the Florida ballot there are actually very few candidate races. In fact, the majority of what you’ll be voting for on November 8th are ballot initiatives: changes to the state constitution, county charter or various municipal questions.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Obamacare’s namesake came to Miami-Dade County Thursday afternoon to talk about the Affordable Care Act, just a few weeks before the program’s fourth open enrollment period starts.

President Barack Obama, before heading to a Hillary Clinton campaign rally in Miami Gardens, spoke to a large crowd of mostly students at Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus.

Hillary Clinton is far outpacing Donald Trump by historic margins among likely Miami-Dade County voters, according to a new WLRN/Univision 23 poll released today.

Florida does not currently have a death penalty.

Fair Punishment Project

Florida is an outlier when it comes to sentencing people to death.

Solar energy is a hot issue again in Florida.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Projections are still holding that Hurricane Matthew may circle back towards South Florida after a near miss this week.

And there’s some concern from officials that this first miss may have a lasting impact on future storm preparations, preparations, that have dotted South Beach with sand bands and odd pieces of plywood.

The entire front of Cheeseburger Baby on Washington Avenue in South Beach is covered in plywood. Beside a makeshift door also made of plywood, “Yo! We’re open” is written in pink spray paint.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

When a storm looks like it's going to hit the region you cover as a reporter, it's probably a good idea to be there.

Slight problem:  I was still in North Carolina the day Hurricane Matthew was set to pummel South Florida. So I enlisted a friend's help to get to South Florida in time to cover the storm.

Step one was getting a flight to Orlando. I got a couple of strange looks when I showed up at the airport willing to travel to an area under a hurricane warning. 

Associated Press

Forty-two percent of all South Floridians rent their homes. And as it turns out, there’s not a whole lot of obligation for landlords to help tenants prepare for a coming storm.

C.M. GUERRERO / EL NUEVO HERALD

More money is coming to fight Zika.

On Thursday Governor Rick Scott announced that he would allocate $25 million dollars in state funds to help fight the mosquito-borne virus. This is in addition to the $36 million he has already allocated for combating the virus, which can cause severe birth defects.

The governor says the state must focus on finding a vaccine to protect pregnant women and their developing babies. Thus the latest funding from Scott is slated to go toward research into finding a vaccine and a more cost-effective way to test for the disease.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Solar energy is yet again a hot issue in the Sunshine State. Voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment in August giving tax relief to businesses that own or lease solar panels. Another solar amendment will be on Florida’s ballot in November.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

On opening night for the Marlins in April, it was Miami vs. the Detroit Tigers. As the booming voice in the stadium announced the lineup, a new guy walked from the bullpen onto the field: Number 54, Wei-Yin Chen, a native of Taiwan.

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