Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Creative Commons via Flickr user Andrew Brown

Behind closed doors on Wednesday, the Miami City Commission approved major changes to the Pottinger settlement.

The historic court agreement has protected the rights of Miami’s homeless since it first went into effect in 1998. The original Pottinger agreement protected what’s called "life sustaining activities" like sleeping on the street, lighting fires for cooking and urinating in public — all without being arrested.

Creative Commons via Flickr

This Jan. 8 marks the 50th anniversary of former President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty, which left a checkered legacy after 1960s policies to combat growing poverty. We thought this marked an appropriate time to take stock of how local communities are doing.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

It is college-application season, which means high-school seniors across the country are scrambling to write personal statements, list all their extracurricular activities and take the SATs.

Sierra DuBose is one of those seniors, enrolled at Miami Edison Senior High, but she is also one of almost 7,000 kids in the Miami-Dade public-school system who are homeless. That's about 2 percent of the student population.

Sierra currently lives in a shelter for women called Lotus House, on the edge of Overtown.

Wilson Sayre

WLRN-Miami Herald News reporter Wilson Sayre spoke on Fusion network's news program DNA with Derrick Ashong to talk about the range of local responses to sea-level rise. She was joined by Andrea Bernstein of WNYC's Transportation Nation.

Basel Recap: What We Saw And Heard

Dec 10, 2013
Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Art Basel 2013 is over. During it, Wynwood and Miami Beach were oozing with art, music, and people (some of whom could be considered art).

Even though some of Wynwood's and Midtown’s satellite art fairs might be pushed out soon, we thought Entitled, Spectrum, Art Miami and Miami Project were great this year. Check out some of them in the pictures above.

Wilson Sayre

Art Miami, an Art Basel satellite fair, held a symposium this week on women in the arts.

The event was designed to bring attention to inequality between men and women on gallery walls, both the amount of women artists and the value of their work.

Wilson Sayre

Art Basel satellite fairs are having a harder time setting up shop in Wynwood and Midtown as the area becomes an established, year-round neighborhood.

Owners of vacant lots and empty buildings tend to prefer long-term leases to short-term ones, which is what many of the Basel fairs rely on. When Lock and Load Machine Gun Experience and Gun Range moved into one of those formerly vacant buildings, it forced Fountain Art Fair to look for alternative spaces.

Creative Commons via Flickr user Low Jianwei

Following national discussion about minimum wages, livable wages, and government assistance, WLRN-Miami Herald News wants to explore just what it takes to live in South Florida.

No one is exempt from paying for things: food, clothing, rent, bills -- the list goes on. Some of us can easily afford life's expenses, while others struggle to make ends meet.

We want to explore your views on these topics through a series called "How Much Is Enough?"

Wilson Sayre

In observation of Homeless Awareness Week, students at Design and Architecture Senior High (DASH) have created models of possible living solutions for the homeless.

Each student in Eric Hankin’s architecture class designed a small apartment plan that had to include all the necessities of a regular apartment.

On Thursday, the students presented their models to professional architects for judging and feedback. The students were judged based on the creativity, feasibility and presentation of their design. 

Wilson Sayre

  I don’t remember being told Woodrow Wilson was my great-great-grandfather. It was a fact I grew up with. A picture of my newborn grandfather, the last child ever born in the White House, being gazed at by mighty Woodrow, hung in the staircase of my parents’ home.

Beside it was a Wilson campaign poster from which he looked through his iconic pince-nez glasses and over his long, angular nose at me. But the person I was named after was, in many ways, a mystery.

Flogert Dollani / Flickr CC

Wednesday is Give Miami Day. It was established last year by the Miami Foundation to encourage donations to local non-profits. Their idea is to establish a culture of giving in Miami. But what counts as charitable giving?

As you consider whether or how you will participate in Give Miami Day, try your hand at this quiz to see if you can pick out what's philanthropy and what isn't.

ANSWER CHOICES: 
A. Philanthropy
B. Charity
C. Neither
D. Both philanthropy and charity

Creative Commons via Flickr user Candie_N

UPDATE: 10:30 a.m., Nov. 20: Keon Hardemon will be the next District 5 Commissioner for Miami. In the runoff election against Rev. Richard Dunn Tuesday, Hardemon received more than 72 percent of the vote. He will take office on Nov. 27.

In advance of Tuesday’s elections, City of Miami voters are reading up on the candidates, their platforms and track records, figuring out whom to give their vote to. But in the process, some constituents may discover they’ve been brushing up on candidates from the wrong district.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

Starting Nov. 7, the WLRN-Miami Herald News staff brought you feature coverage of the effects sea-level rise has on our coastal communities.

Reporting fellow Wilson Sayre produced an hour-long special including the past weeks' feature programming and previously unaired content. The program, "Rising Seas in South Florida," was hosted by WLRN vice-president of news Tom Hudson and aired at noon on Thursday, Nov. 14.

Listen to it here:

Phillip Pessar/Flickr

Nov. 14 is Homeless Awareness Day in Miami-Dade County. For the event's fifth year, the Homeless Trust is putting on Homeless Awareness Day rallies aimed at publicizing the homeless' plight, as well as celebrating individuals who have dedicated themselves to the cause. An opening ceremony honored the Homeless Trust's outreach workers, known as the "green shirts."

Florida Department of Transportation

If not for its patchwork of different shades of asphalt, you would never imagine the stretch of State Road A1A along Fort Lauderdale Beach was all underwater a year ago.

Last November, Tropical Storm Sandy and small storms that followed washed out a four-block section of A1A, north of Sunrise Boulevard. Sandy wasn’t a big storm, so the uncharacteristic destruction it brought has been explained by sea-level rise, which can cause increasingly harmful storm surges.

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