Wilson Sayre


Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

  We’re about a month into summer break for students in South Florida. But if you drive around schools frequently, it’s not always clear whether you’re still supposed to follow those posted speed limits telling you to drive a sluggish 15 miles per hour.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

What happens when you get a group of WLRN listeners together to ride public transit and experience art? They arrive early to an 8 a.m. event.

We rode around the Omni Loop of the Metromover to experience Ivan Depeña's new art project "The Sounds," which uses the tram to whisk you through a growing sound composition that builds to a crescendo at Museum Park Station.

Read more about the project here.

Courtesy of VONA

The Voices of Our Nation Arts foundation workshop kicked off this week at the University of Miami.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

A new public art project in downtown Miami is piping music into the Metromover. It’s not coming over the loud speaker, but through a new app that’s designed to let people uncover hidden art in the world.

Get on the Metromover at Government Center Station, open an app called “Lapse,” put on some headphones and as you slowly make your way around the circuit, a symphony slowly builds to a rich and textured audio composition. “The Sounds” is one part of Ivan Depeña’s goal to mix art, virtual reality and a twinge of  science fiction.

Credit Creative Commons via Flickr / PRAYITNO (HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/EHWOY6)

Miami International Airport is one of the biggest economic engines of South Florida and workers there are now demanding better working conditions. Several aired grievances Thursday at the county’s Trade and Tourism Committee meeting held at the airport.

The workers gave their testimony four floors above where most of them drive trucks that tug baggage trolleys, push wheelchairs and clean airplane cabins. They work for companies that contract with airlines to provide these kinds of services.

Scenes of Grief and Healing in South Florida After Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Spencer Parts

In the hours and days following the Sunday massacre at a gay club in Orlando, members of South Florida's LGBT community have gathered to mourn and to provide comfort to each other.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Spontaneous memorials and community vigils proliferated across South Florida in the aftermath of a shooting that killed 50 and left 52 wounded at a gay nightclub in Orlando early Sunday morning.

Miami Beach Police Department

As law enforcement agencies try to piece together  what happened Sunday morning at a gay nightclub in Orlando, when at least 50 people were gunned down, many in South Florida wonder about security and how to protect themselves and those they love from similar attacks. 

  "Every time there is a pride event, there is that fear that exists, especially since we have seen the passage of marriage equality," says Cindy Brown, Miami-Dade development officer for Equality Florida, the largest LGBTQ rights advocacy group in the state. 


Creative Commons via Flickr / User: Tax Credits (https://flic.kr/p/chEwR9)

Ernest Bellamy is an architectural designer and native Miamian. At 32-years-old, he decided to go back to school to get his master's degree, but decided that even with a full ride to the University of Miami opportunities looked better outside of Miami.

He is one of the many individuals who have been affected by the prosperity gap that has grown in Miami-Dade County since 2000. That’s the overarching finding of a study we reported on when it came out from the Florida International University Metropolitan Center.

What is it

About this place


Sound and stories…

So salty.

That’s our ZipOde, a poetic ode to our zip code here at the studios in Miami: 33132.

Your zip determines the number of words in each line of the poem. So, for us, that’s three words, then three words, one word, three and two.

With our partner O, Miami poetry festival, we asked you to memorialize your own federally appointed numerical designation by writing ZipOdes.

More than 1,100 poems came in and they were a lot of fun to read.

FIU Metropolitan Center

  Poverty is up in Miami-Dade County and wages are about the same as they were back in 2010 when adjusted for inflation.

Those are just a few of the findings of a new comprehensive study of prosperity in the county coming out Wednesday from the Florida International University Metropolitan Center that paints a picture of the region that in many ways looks worse than during the height of the last recession.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

For the past year, Lucy Perry and her longtime boyfriend William Royal have lived beneath a traffic sign on the sidewalk along Southwest Second Street under I-95. With about four dozen other homeless people, they wait for a church group to come by and hand out styrofoam containers of food.


Perry, Royal and many others out on the street are among the 350,000 people who lost their food stamps this year because of new state rules that adults without children who can work must work in order to get the monthly assistance.


Wilson Sayre / WLRN

You are always in someone’s way on the nuclear submarine USS California.

People can only pass in the hall sideways. Head clearance isn't very generous, either. Most of the crew sleep in “racks” of three bunk beds that are hardly ever unoccupied. They call it “hot racking,” where men on different shifts rotate through their precious sleep time.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Let’s lure jobs from California to Florida. That’s the crux of a controversial radio ad airing in Los Angeles and San Francisco in advance of Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s trip there next week for a “trade mission.”

But how that ad was paid for has raised some eyebrows.

Enterprise Florida, the state’s mostly taxpayer funded economic development agency, footed the bill. This comes on the heel of a difficult legislative session where its request for $250 million in economic incentive money was denied.

Tim Padgett / WLRN

South Florida drivers have a certain reputation and driving fast is a big part of that. Last year, 798,000 people in Florida were pulled over for speeding. A little more than 136,000 people used some version of a traffic school to mask the points on their license so that insurance premiums don’t go up.

And now, I am a part of that; I was going 88 in a 70-mile-per-hour zone in St. Lucie County.