Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

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Everyone has a right to an education at least until high school, right?

As Anthony Espinoza found out, it’s not so simple, especially when you hit 16. At that age, young people can choose to drop out of school. But Anthony wanted back in school after he had to leave the magnet school he attended because his grades were suffering following dozens of absences and tardies.

Anthony tries to figure out exactly what happened to him and figure out what to do next. Listen to his story:

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Private prisons are out for federal inmates, which is bad news for the Boca Raton-based GEO Group.

A memo released Thursday from the U.S. Justice Department said it will be phasing out the use of privately operated prisons, including ones operated by the GEO Group, as soon as possible. Since the announcement, the publicly traded private prison company has seen it’s stocks plummet almost 40 percent by the closing bell.

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How much can Florida’s minimum wage actually buy? Well, not a whole lot, apparently. And making that wage will not carry a person out of poverty, according to new study from the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University.

The study modeled what families have to pay for when parents work—child care, transportation, taxes—and compared those expenses to increases in earnings as parents work more hours.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Do you remember the newer version of The Italian Job with Mark Wahlberg?  

A team of glorified thieves is trying to steal back a couple million in gold bricks. Their escape in a fleet of mini coopers hinges on their computer wiz’s ability to hack into the city’s traffic control center and make sure their route is free, and their pursuers get stuck in traffic.

Well that traffic puppeteer possibility is now a reality in Miami-Dade County, which for the first time has a centralized system to view intersections and change lights with the few clicks on the computer.

Wilson Sayre

Art and social justice. For centuries artists have been combining the two and a show opening Friday in Miami once again hopes to harness this form of human creativity to get people to talk about human rights.

One piece at the show at Art Bastion Gallery in Wynwood features two panels full of rubber duckies: one yellow, the other blue. But, there’s an exception. One duckie from each color have been switched.

  And those two duckies “stick out like a sore thumb,” says Courtney Levine, a volunteer with Amnesty International.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Mamoncillo, genipe, ginepa, limoncillo, canepa and skinip.

These are just a few of the ways people refer to what English speakers call “Spanish limes.”

While everyone is recovering from overindulging in mangoes this summer, WLRN’s youth radio interns wanted to explore another tropical fruit ripening in this heat. While it’s not as popular as the mango, it’s a common landscaping plant in South Florida. So you might have one and not even know you can eat the fruit!

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

On any given night in South Florida you can find a place to dance salsa, merengue or bachata. But when you think about going out to dance in Miami, contra dance is not high on the list, if it’s on the list at all.

WLRN

A manhunt is underway in downtown Fort Lauderdale, where an inmate facing the death penalty escaped while waiting for a court hearing on Friday morning. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

  We’re about a month into summer break for students in South Florida. But if you drive around schools frequently, it’s not always clear whether you’re still supposed to follow those posted speed limits telling you to drive a sluggish 15 miles per hour.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

What happens when you get a group of WLRN listeners together to ride public transit and experience art? They arrive early to an 8 a.m. event.

We rode around the Omni Loop of the Metromover to experience Ivan Depeña's new art project "The Sounds," which uses the tram to whisk you through a growing sound composition that builds to a crescendo at Museum Park Station.

Read more about the project here.

Courtesy of VONA

The Voices of Our Nation Arts foundation workshop kicked off this week at the University of Miami.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

A new public art project in downtown Miami is piping music into the Metromover. It’s not coming over the loud speaker, but through a new app that’s designed to let people uncover hidden art in the world.

Get on the Metromover at Government Center Station, open an app called “Lapse,” put on some headphones and as you slowly make your way around the circuit, a symphony slowly builds to a rich and textured audio composition. “The Sounds” is one part of Ivan Depeña’s goal to mix art, virtual reality and a twinge of  science fiction.

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Miami International Airport is one of the biggest economic engines of South Florida and workers there are now demanding better working conditions. Several aired grievances Thursday at the county’s Trade and Tourism Committee meeting held at the airport.

The workers gave their testimony four floors above where most of them drive trucks that tug baggage trolleys, push wheelchairs and clean airplane cabins. They work for companies that contract with airlines to provide these kinds of services.

Scenes of Grief and Healing in South Florida After Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Spencer Parts

In the hours and days following the Sunday massacre at a gay club in Orlando, members of South Florida's LGBT community have gathered to mourn and to provide comfort to each other.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Spontaneous memorials and community vigils proliferated across South Florida in the aftermath of a shooting that killed 50 and left 52 wounded at a gay nightclub in Orlando early Sunday morning.

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