Wilson Sayre


Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

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Florida Department of Corrections

Over the last several years, European drug manufacturers have tried to limit the use of their products in lethal injection executions. As a result, death penalty states were left scrambling to find replacements.

In 2013, Florida began using a new drug called midazolam that is now the subject of a U.S. Supreme Court case: Glossip v. Gross. The state, which has one of the most active active death chambers, has halted all executions for the past six months awaiting a decision on the case.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Pete Jordan (https://flic.kr/p/c3STn3)

This year, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken on a litany of big cases with far-reaching implications especially for Floridians. Here are some things you need to know about how several upcoming decisions will affect the Sunshine State.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Boston Public Library (https://flic.kr/p/dm191d)

Today on the Florida Roundup, we're talking special session, soccer and Spanish.


At 1 p.m. Monday afternoon gavels will fall in the Florida House and Senate, calling to order a special session of the state Legislature. Lawmakers have only one piece of business to take care of: pass a budget before July 1 or risk a state government shutdown.

Creative Commons

A new map created by the the University of Miami's Office of Civic and Community Engagement hopes not only to show where affordable housing is located but also some of the different demographic information that may be driving its placement.

Charles Trainor / Miami Herald

May 20, 1985: Ronald Reagan was president. Madonna was topping the charts. And Radio Martí went on the air.

The Miami-based, federally-funded station began beaming Spanish-language news and entertainment into communist Cuba 30 years ago today. It was a sort of tropical version of Radio Free Europe – a Cold War effort to transmit information beyond the control of the island's totalitarian Castro regime.

State Archives of Florida

Thirty-five years ago, Miami's Liberty City was smoldering -- flames leapt from the shells of cars while people looted businesses.

Eighteen people died, and more than $100 million worth of property was destroyed.

The McDuffie Riots were more violent than what happened in Baltimore and Ferguson, but there are lots of similarities.

Today in the news you heard:

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

UPDATE: The Miami-Dade County Commission has canceled the May 19th workshop on ride-sharing, but most expect the meeting to be rescheduled.

There’s a big legal gray area in Florida when it comes to ride-sharing services like Lyft and Uber. Technically they’re operating illegally, but local counties have turned a blind eye to their operations, which in Miami are now hitting the one-year mark.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Eric Salard (https://flic.kr/p/rRgdfK)

Despite being a little bit better at keeping on schedule, airlines are facing more complaints from customers, according to the latest Department of Transportation Air Travel Consumer Report.

Spirit Airlines, the Miramar-based budget airline, had the second-worst rate of complaints in March among all 13 reporting carriers, including AmericanAirlines, which operates U.S. Airways. Only Colorado-based Frontier Airlines had more reported grumbling customers than Spirit.

Creative Commons

After plans were announced to raze the Liberty Square housing projects in Miami's Liberty City, residents and housing advocates were concerned about where the projects' inhabitants would move to as low-income housing in the city dwindles.