Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continues her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

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Immigration
6:28 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

DOJ Pushed Up Court Proceedings For Newest Unaccompanied Undocumented Children

A new Department of Justice policy works to get the newest unaccompanied minors who have crossed into the U.S. to court faster.
Credit Creative Commons via Flickr / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

A new move from the Department of Justice hopes to jumpstart the court proceedings for some of the most recent unaccompanied minors to arrive in the United States. 

The speed, though, has many immigration lawyers alarmed.

The federal government’s new policy says many of the kids who have come into the country on or after May, 1, must have their first court hearing within 21 days from the start of their legal proceedings: the filing of their notice to appear in court.

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Parking
3:02 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Delray To Increase Parking Fee For Businesses

Delray Beach may look to businesses to shoulder more of the costs of building parking.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Omar_Bárcena

The City of Delray Beach is looking to increase the parking fee some business owners pay to help build parking garages or city lots.

The city dictates how many parking spots a business must have based on what it is and how big it is: an office needs one spot per 300 square feet while a restaurant needs six spots per 1,000 square feet. Each time the use of a building changes the incoming business must meet the new parking requirements.

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South Miami
9:13 am
Thu July 31, 2014

Ransom Everglades Offers Swim Lessons To Kids Without Pools

The partnership between Ransom Everglades School and South Miami hopes to teach life-saving swim skills.
Credit Wilson Sayre

  A few kids in South Miami, a city with no public pool, are getting the opportunity to take free swim lessons at Ransom Everglades School in Coconut Grove.

Tina Scott, a pediatrician in South Miami, arranged the partnership between the city and private school to address the lack of swimming skills she regularly saw in her patients.

“One of the things that I do when I see patients is to ask about water: Do you live near water? Do you have a pool in your backyard? A canal? To make sure that the kids actually know how to swim,” she says.

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Youth
12:48 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Programs Offers Inner City Youths Professional Field Training

Some youth in Miami's inner city are paid to learn code though FACE's summer program.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Lindsey Bieda

FACE, a paid summer internship program for young adults, is wrapping up and showing off what its participants have been up to in the past six weeks.

The name of the program stands for film, arts, culture (and coding) and entrepreneurship. Participants choose an area of focus and pair up with industry professionals to develop and execute a project in that field.

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Liberty City
10:29 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Despite Pioneering Integration, Jumbo's Did Not Survive

Jumbo's owner has decided to fry his last shrimp after almost six decades.
Credit Wilson Sayre

Jumbo’s, a fixture of Miami's Liberty City, will serve its last batch of fried shrimp Wednesday. The diner has been open almost every hour since its first shift in 1955.

The restaurant gained a reputation for its bold move to integrate its staff in 1967, and owner Bobby Flam once saw a bustling dining room filled with black and white patrons. But the past decade has seen slowing business and crumbling décor.

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Homeless
5:35 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

Survey Concludes Miami-Dade's Treatment Of Homeless Is "Mixed Bag"

Miami-Dade County was applauded for its method of funding homeless services, but dinged for some laws on its books
Credit Wilson Sayre / WLRN

A new national report found a general trend toward criminalizing the homeless, and criticized the laws of some areas in Florida. The report, published by the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, looked at how municipalities treat the homeless.

It found more and more cities have banned activities like sleeping on sidewalks, sitting in public spaces or storing personal possessions outside.

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Health Care
3:22 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Florida First In Medicaid Coverage For Mentally Ill

Florida is rolling out new Medicaid plans specifically for people with severe mental health diagnoses.
Credit Creative Commons of Charles Bell's Anatomy of the Brain, c. 1802 / Flickr user Shaheen Lakhan

  This month, Florida became the first state to offer a Medicaid plan dedicated to people who are diagnosed with severe mental health disorders.

It’s part of a larger move by the state’s Medicaid officials to move coverage towards a managed care system. It means one organization takes care of and coordinates all of a person’s health care needs: no more separate dental, vision, and internal medicine plans.

Mental health issues are almost twice as prevalent among Medicaid recipients than in the general population.

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Housing
7:19 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Little Havana Development Gives Homes To Nearly 200 People

Amistad is the newest affordable housing development from Carrfour Supportive Housing and Pinnacle Housing Group
Credit Wilson Sayre

 

Almost 200 people now have a place to call home in an affordable housing development just opened in Little Havana.

In addition to a roof, kitchens and beds for low-income and formerly homeless people, Amistad’s 89 apartments offer supportive housing services:

“We do case management, we do employment and training services, we do life-skills training, we do parenting-skills trainings, we do activities with the kids,” says Stephanie Berman, president of Carrfour Supportive Housing.

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Architecture
5:58 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

New Buildings Put Bay Harbor MiMo Architecture At Risk

Bay Harbor's Miami Modern architecture has made the list for most endangered historic sites in the country.
Credit Miami-Dade County Office of Historic Preservation

  Bay Harbor’s East Island has been listed as one of the most endangered historic places in the country.

The island, which is home to one of the largest concentrations of Miami Modern architecture in the nation, joined 10 other endangered sites on a list compiled by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

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Money
3:16 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

How Will Libraries Fare In Gimenez's Budget?

Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Phillip Pessar

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez is slated to reveal his proposal for next year’s budget tomorrow and lots of eyes are on how much he will allocate for county libraries.

John Quick, president of Friends of the Miami-Dade Public Libraries, has fought cuts in library hours and personnel as the county is forced to dip into reserves to keep them afloat.

 

For Quick, $64 million is the magic number.

 

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Beach
11:59 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Five Misconceptions About South Florida Lifeguards

Anthony Mariano and Erick Guzman have been Ocean Rescue lifeguards for Hallandale Beach for the past several years.
Credit Wilson Sayre

For many beach-goers, lifeguards only exist inside the tiny towers that dot the beach and in their memories of Baywatch episodes.

So what lifeguards (or ocean rescuers) actually do isn't widely understood.

Here are five misconceptions about lifeguards for you below:

1. This is a summer job for college kids.

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Veterans Affairs
4:19 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Nurses Training At FIU To Team Up With VA

Credit Creative Commons

Florida International University will now partner with Veterans Affairs medical centers in Miami to provide training to budding nurses.

The Veterans Affairs Nursing Academic Partnership provided the university with an $8 million grant to bring in more students and faculty over the next five years. Twenty additional students will start this fall, totaling 160 students over the next five years.

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Airports
5:34 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Tip Your Wheelchair Pusher At Fort Lauderdale Airport

Many wheelchair attendants at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport make less than minimum wage.
Credit Wilson Sayre

Take our quiz to see how good you are at identifying who you should tip.  

If you eat at a restaurant, it's obvious you won't just pay the price of your meal. Tipping is not just customary, it is understood to be part of a server's take-home pay.

It is not so obvious, however, that wheelchair attendants at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport are paid the very same way.

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Food Banks
12:18 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Local Food Distrubutor Gets Funding Increase

Homestead-based Farm Share received an extra $500,000 this year to go towards food transportation.
Credit Creative Commons

A Homestead-based food-assistance program called Farm Share received a $1.5 million check last week. State Rep. Kionne McGhee delivered the money, which was allocated in this year’s state budget. This is a $500,000 increase from last year’s state contribution.

Farm Share uses inmate and volunteer labor to sort, package and deliver food to churches, soup kitchens or other organizations across the state that use and distribute food to those in need. It provides the food for free, unlike many other food distribution organizations.

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Remembering
11:49 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Trayvon Martin Foundation Finds Home At Florida Memorial University

The Trayvon Martin Foundation has found a home at Florida Memorial University.
Credit Creative Commons

The Trayvon Martin Foundation now has a home at Florida Memorial University.

The foundation was started by Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, the parents of the Miami Gardens teen who was shot and killed in 2012. Fulton is an alumna of the university. Her foundation works to raise awareness about the impact of violent crimes on families and communities. It’s a support system for people who have experienced tragedies.

Roslyn Artis, president of the Miami Gardens university, sees this as an opportunity to turn tragedy into education.

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