Wilson Sayre


Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

You didn't have time to wait for the long list of results last night? Fear not.  The WLRN team has summarized the key takeaways of this primary election for South Florida. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Florida’s solar Amendment 4 passed with brilliant colors Tuesday. With only 60 percent needed to pass, the measure’s overwhelming support suggests, perhaps, a new direction for solar in the Sunshine State, a relatively untapped source of energy.


Creative Commons via Flickr / Joe Gratz (https://flic.kr/p/bkUna)

As South Florida voters go to the polls this week during early voting or at your precinct on election day Tuesday, you’ll see a bunch of judicial races listed on your ballot:

Miami-Dade 11th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 9, 34, 52, 66 and 74;

Broward 17th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 9, 15, 23 and 24

Palm Beach 15th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 1 and 4


Miami-Dade County Judge Groups 5, 7, 15 and 35

Monroe County Judge Group 3

Broward County Judge Groups 2, 3, 7, 8, 13, 14 and 21


People are looking a bit nervously at Invest 99L, the tropical disturbance heading up through the Bahamas.

Current projections have the storm making its way to South Florida by early next week, which, if you are a good citizen, should maybe strike a bell: Tuesday is election day.

So what happens to elections day if it also happens to be hurricane day?

Only the state has the authority to move or adjust voting times in light of things like weather or any other kind of interference.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

At noon on a cloudless day, the sun beats down on the rooftop of a Coconut Grove hotel. Daren Goldin, a solar contractor, walks around rows of solar panels installed at angles on the white roof. The sun’s reflection is almost blinding, like snow on a sunny day.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

South Florida’s Olympic Silver medal winner is back home.

Danell Leyva brought home a silver in high bar and another silver in parallel bars, both packed in red and white tube socks in his carry-on.

At the airport to meet his flight home were friends and family, also a few dozen young gymnasts from Universal Gymnastics, where Leyva started.

Clearly tired from everything that’s happened to him in the past few weeks, the 24-year-old said he said he’s happy to be home, if not a little overwhelmed.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

The Aug. 30 election will be  the first to host elections in  the newly redrawn state and federal congressional districts.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

“It's jail food, I feel like I’m in prison.

“It’s sometimes cold and salty. Sometimes it has no taste.”

“I look at the school lunch and don’t even eat it”

These are just a few of the comments Rachel Greig collected about very few people’s favorite meal: school lunch.

The Miami-Dade County high school junior talks about school lunch all the time with her younger brother and dad, an elementary school teacher. And always wondered why it didn’t meet her standards for a good meal.

Follow her journey to get some answers:

Creative Commons via Flickr / Victor Björkund (https://flic.kr/p/hPKtwF)

Everyone has a right to an education at least until high school, right?

As Anthony Espinoza found out, it’s not so simple, especially when you hit 16. At that age, young people can choose to drop out of school. But Anthony wanted back in school after he had to leave the magnet school he attended because his grades were suffering following dozens of absences and tardies.

Anthony tries to figure out exactly what happened to him and figure out what to do next. Listen to his story:

Creative Commons Via Flickr

Private prisons are out for federal inmates, which is bad news for the Boca Raton-based GEO Group.

A memo released Thursday from the U.S. Justice Department said it will be phasing out the use of privately operated prisons, including ones operated by the GEO Group, as soon as possible. Since the announcement, the publicly traded private prison company has seen it’s stocks plummet almost 40 percent by the closing bell.

Creative Commons via Flickr
User: Tax Credits (https://flic.kr/p/chEwR9)

How much can Florida’s minimum wage actually buy? Well, not a whole lot, apparently. And making that wage will not carry a person out of poverty, according to new study from the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University.

The study modeled what families have to pay for when parents work—child care, transportation, taxes—and compared those expenses to increases in earnings as parents work more hours.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Do you remember the newer version of The Italian Job with Mark Wahlberg?  

A team of glorified thieves is trying to steal back a couple million in gold bricks. Their escape in a fleet of mini coopers hinges on their computer wiz’s ability to hack into the city’s traffic control center and make sure their route is free, and their pursuers get stuck in traffic.

Well that traffic puppeteer possibility is now a reality in Miami-Dade County, which for the first time has a centralized system to view intersections and change lights with the few clicks on the computer.

Wilson Sayre

Art and social justice. For centuries artists have been combining the two and a show opening Friday in Miami once again hopes to harness this form of human creativity to get people to talk about human rights.

One piece at the show at Art Bastion Gallery in Wynwood features two panels full of rubber duckies: one yellow, the other blue. But, there’s an exception. One duckie from each color have been switched.

  And those two duckies “stick out like a sore thumb,” says Courtney Levine, a volunteer with Amnesty International.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Mamoncillo, genipe, ginepa, limoncillo, canepa and skinip.

These are just a few of the ways people refer to what English speakers call “Spanish limes.”

While everyone is recovering from overindulging in mangoes this summer, WLRN’s youth radio interns wanted to explore another tropical fruit ripening in this heat. While it’s not as popular as the mango, it’s a common landscaping plant in South Florida. So you might have one and not even know you can eat the fruit!

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

On any given night in South Florida you can find a place to dance salsa, merengue or bachata. But when you think about going out to dance in Miami, contra dance is not high on the list, if it’s on the list at all.