Wilson Sayre


Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways To Connect


App-based taxi services like Uber and Lyft are back in business in Broward County.

In a meeting much shorter than the last one on this issue, commissioners voted 6-2 on an ordinance that opens pathways for the apps to come back online for Broward residents.

Representatives from Uber said they could turn the app back on as soon as Thursday.

Broward County Mayor Tim Ryan says this is a win for residents.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

 Tuesday marked a victory for many workers at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport after the Broward County Commission voted in favor of raises for wheelchair pushers, cabin cleaners and others.

These airport workers work for companies that contract with the airlines, not the county, so have not been covered by the Broward living wage ordinance until now.

Starting Jan. 1, workers will make at least $11.68 an hour if they’re getting health benefits and $13.20 if not. That’s the same as what all Broward County employees earn.

Paid For Your Plastic

Oct 6, 2015
Wilson Sayre / WLRN

About half of the junk Floridians left out on the curb in 2013 went into landfills, the other half was either incinerated or recycled. But the state would like to see less trash headed to dumps—just 25 percent—by 2020. So counties and cities have been trying to figure out how to get people to recycle more and trash less.

One of those experiments has been playing out in Hollywood for the past five years, and it  has turned recycling into a game.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Kathryn Decker (https://flic.kr/p/9yMfuF)

Update 10/6/2015 5:15 p.m. - This measure passed in an 8-4 vote.

People who have been to jail may soon find it easier to get a job with Miami-Dade County.

The controversial law that would take questions about criminal history off county job applications is up for final debate at Tuesday’s commission meeting.

Creative Commons via Flickr / r2hox (https://flic.kr/p/gdMrKi)

More data may be coming to Miami-Dade County residents.

The county commission will take a look at a resolution Tuesday that would try to make county numbers and information more accessible to the public.

Right now, if someone wants information on county housing inventory or wages, that person has to make a request, go record by record and make their own spreadsheet. But Miami-Dade County is trying to make it so that more data is stored online in a format that is  easy to use and understand.

    Becoming an adult holds the promise of new freedoms -- no curfew, driving, maybe living on your own -- but as everyone who has been a teenager knows, it comes with more responsibility, financial responsibilities in particular, whether you are ready or not.

For the first time, WLRN led a summer program teaching six high schoolers how to tell their own stories through sound. Working with them provided unique insights into what they’re thinking about their economic futures -- a future that is statistically challenging.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Volkswagen has now admitted that it misled everyone by equipping about 11 million diesel cars with a device to cheat emissions tests.

Lisa Lowrance owns one of those cars—a 2013 Black Volkswagen Beetle TDI—and has filed a class action lawsuit in federal court in Florida against the German-based car company.

Lowrance bought the car after a long search for an eco-friendly vehicle that didn’t compromise on performance. Like the rest of the world, she found out her car was not  eco-friendly when the story broke online and in the news.

There's only a few more weeks until open enrollment begins for healthcare plans on the federal Health Insurance Marketplace, also called Obamacare.

An estimated 22 percent of Miami-Dade County residents were uninsured last year, making Miami the second most uninsured metro area in the country.

In a speech at Howard University, Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell identified Miami as one of the fed’s target areas going into this third year of the health insurance enrollment.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Maarten Visser (https://flic.kr/p/9C1JUP)

Many of the lowest paid workers at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International airport have moved one step closer to what’s considered a “living wage” in Broward County.

For the past several years,  workers like baggage handlers, skycaps and wheelchair assistants at the airport have been fighting to be covered by the Broward County living wage ordinance,  which would bring minimum wages to $11.68 for workers with health benefits and $13.20 for workers without.

  The South Florida housing market is on the mend, according to the latest foreclosure numbers from RealtyTrac. The numbers paint a bright road for future homeowners, but don't mean much for those under foreclosure now.

Miami saw the second highest foreclosure rate among the 20 largest metro areas in August, averaging one foreclosure filing for every 568 housing units.