Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Simone Dinnerstein

An orchestra from Cuba is making its South Florida debut amidst changing relations between it and the U.S.

The Havana Lyceum Orchestra is on its first tour throughout the U.S. and will be performing Friday at the New World Center in Miami Beach.

The orchestra is one of the country’s most prominent classical music groups composed of conservatory students, graduates and music teachers.

With about half of the members of the orchestra, violinist Maiin Hau has been touring the east coast: New York, Philadelphia, Boston, now Miami Beach.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Wonderlane (https://flic.kr/p/7euNF1)


In 2015, Florida tied California for the second highest population of incarcerated women in the United States. The facilities they live in are generally away from population centers, surrounded by rows of fences and razor wire.

As of March 13, 2017, Florida has a death penalty again.

Though the sentence is law again in Florida, many inmates continue to live on Death Row without knowing if they will ultimately die by the state’s hand or not.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

David Beckham has been trying for more than three years to find a site to build a Major League Soccer (MLS) stadium in Miami. The end of his search seems near, as Miami-Dade county considers selling him a piece of land in Overtown. But residents of the area have mixed feelings about the plan, as evidenced Wednesday night at a community town hall. 

The Constitution Revision Commission

On Wednesday, the Constitution Revision Commission met to work on  passing its first measure: rules to govern how it will operate over the next year.

While the CRC has been touring the state on what it calls a listening session, it hasn’t  conducted any other official business since the first gathering of its 37 members in March. And the group gathered Wednesday in Tampa didn’t quite get to check off anything new.

Ronna Gradus / Miami Herald

It has been almost three decades since Florida prosecutors have secured a conviction against a law enforcement officer for an on-duty shooting. As the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s office prepares for Friday’s arraignment of a North Miami officer, it’s clear that office is trying to end that stretch.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

In the family visitor’s lounge, under paintings of Disney cartoon characters, two-dozen incarcerated men at Dade Correctional Institution take turns walking up to a microphone to recite poems they wrote while in prison.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

The Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science opened Monday in its new location in downtown Miami.

An enthusiastic crowd welcomed the open doors, a line wrapping around the corner of the entrance for parts of the day.

Read more about the new museum here.

“I think it’s really cool, like they really outdid themselves,” said 13-year-old Ava Santiesteban.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Miami Herald

The new United States labor secretary and the only Hispanic in President Donald Trump's Cabinet is a South Florida native.

Florida International University Law School Dean R. Alexander Acosta was confirmed by the Senate last Thursday.

Acosta was born in Miami to Cuban parents,  attended Gulliver Preparatory School, went away for college and law school at Harvard University, and returned to Miami in his professional life.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Floridians can now change the Florida Constitution from their couches, at least for the next few months.

The Constitution Revision Commission has started accepting suggestions for amendments to the state’s governing document online.

The 37-person Constitution Revision Commission (CRC) meets once every 20 years and is tasked with figuring out what changes or additions need to be made to Florida's governing document in order to bring the state through the next 20 years.

Gesi Schilling / O, Miami

If you Google the phrase “Miami inmates,” you’ll likely find stories about criminals and statistics about prisoners.

But a project called View-Through is trying to trick the Google search algorithm and introduce poems written by incarcerated South Floridians to those results.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson continued his visit to Miami Thursday. Carson is on what he calls a cross-country “listening tour” learning about the projects HUD and other housing organizations fund.

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