Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

The soda aisle in most grocery stores in South Florida looks different than a lot of other places in the United States. Bottles of Jupiña and Postobon  along with cans of Materva and Ironbeer pop out from the shelves in bright colors. For many people in South Florida, these are flavors of hold, companions to meals served hundreds of miles away from South Florida.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

More than three months after Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico, there are thousands on the island still without power and basic necessities and nearly 300,000 people have come to Florida seeking refuge.

Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge

We thought the Animal Kingdom had gone a bit crazy last year, but all that was just a precursor to the crazy Florida stories we’ve seen in 2017. This year, the Sunshine State has seen the development of professional snake hunters, a state-funded position for an iguana wrangler and piss-drunk possums.

Katie Lepri

Up until this year, the Miami City Ballet had been doing the same version of George Balanchine's "The Nutcracker" since the mid-1980s. 

In South Florida, it can be easy to forget what time of year it is. But even though the thermometer is traveling up past 80, it is the holidays.

Here are snapshots — or postcards — of some South Florida holiday traditions.

Courtesy of Soraa

It’s one of those things that’s best not noticed. It’s also the difference between seeing subtle shades of reds and whites and not. And it hangs above almost all gallery installations at art fairs this Miami Art Week.

Did you guess what is it? 

Lights.

Courtesy

If Spotify or Apple Music’s goal is to have all the world's music in one place, what would be the equivalent for visual art?

That’s the space Carter Cleveland wants to fill with his website Artsy.net, the largest online database of contemporary art. It also partners with galleries to sell art.

Cleveland spoke with WLRN’s Wilson Sayre about Artsy.net's aspirations of making art much easier to discover and enjoy. Below is an edited excerpt of their conversation: 

WLRN: Explain what Artsy.net is.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Clad in abstract angled siding swaddling 20,000 square feet of exhibition space, Miami’s newest art museum, the Institute of Contemporary Art Miami (ICA), is now open to the public.

Screen shot from Telemundo's 'Reina de Corazones.'

In the telenovela Reina de Corazones, Pablo Azar plays a revenge-seeking son who poses as a valet driver to get even for his mother’s death.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Jeremy Atkinson (https://flic.kr/p/8GXFgT)

As people clamor to get the best black Friday deals, there’s one thing you may want to leave off your list — alcohol.

Publix Grocery Stores will now deliver booze right to your doorstep if you happened to forgot rum for your coquito or bourbon for your eggnog.

The Lakeland-based grocer has partnered with Instacart for a while now to administer its delivery service. It will now extend that service to Publix Liquor Stores and drop off spirits within two hours of checking out online.

Hungry Harvest

In Florida, 15 percent of families don’t know where they’re going to get their next meal. When you look at children alone, that number increases to almost a quarter who are food insecure, according to Feeding America, one of the largest networks of food banks in the country.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

There is still a chance for some people to sign up for D-SNAP disaster food assistance in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Update 11/20 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved Florida to conduct telephone interviews for individuals who pre-registered for DSNAP who also have a disability or who are over the age of 60. The lawsuit is continuing to push for registration possibilities for people who do not meet that criteria.

After Hurricane Irma, the federal government offered a food assistance program to Floridians who needed help because of the storm. The signup period for that program ended last week.

But there’s an ongoing lawsuit that might reopen registration for some people with disabilities because, the suit claims, the lines to sign up were prohibitively long.

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