Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continues her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

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Closing
4:39 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

David's Cafe Serves Its Last Colada

After 37 years, David's Cafe closed its doors for good this weekend.
Credit Wilson Sayre

David’s Café, an iconic South Beach haunt for locals and tourists alike, closed its doors for good this weekend.

Located the corner of 11th Street and Collins Avenue, David’s was flanked road construction that has dragged on for almost a year. The project has blocked sidewalks and increased gridlock. Adrian Gonzalez, owner, blamed the construction and the recession for sealing the café’s fate.

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FOUND Magazine
11:21 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

This Guy Will Publish The Love Letters You Lose

Davy Rothbart collects lost notes, letters and lists. He then publishes them in his magazine FOUND.
Credit Davy Rothbart

Davy Rothbart is a writer, contributor to This American Life and filmmaker. But he is probably best known as founder and collector of lost things for FOUND Magazine, a publication made of "anything that people have found."

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Fish
4:19 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Florida's Lionfish May Need To Rehearse Their Final Words

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is trying to get rid of the lionfish.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Brian Popik

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is trying to eradicate an invasive species: the lionfish, which swims the South Florida seas.

It's is a funky-looking, red-and-white striped fish. Its fins fan out like a mane, hence the name. But the real image its name should conjure up is of a big bully.

The lionfish population has exploded over the past couple of decades. Its presence has increasingly hurt local native fish and other sea critters.

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Living
10:57 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Fort Lauderdale May Limit Homeless' Ability To Urinate In Public

Fort Lauderdale may crack down on homeless individuals urinating outside.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Daniel Oines

Update: The Fort Lauderdale City Commission unanimously passed both ordinances on first reading. The second reading will most likely be scheduled for the next commission meeting on May, 6.

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How does a city strike a balance between the needs of the homeless and the needs of those around them? Those questions will be put to the Fort Lauderdale City Commission as they consider two provisions on the agenda at Tuesday’s commission meeting.

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Housing And Urban Development
8:22 am
Tue April 15, 2014

$30 Million To Miami-Dade Homeless Programs

HUD's Continuum of Care Program funds housing and other services for the homeless.
Credit Creative Commons via WikiCommons

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has released its list of organizations that will receive funding through the Continuum of Care Program this year. But this year programs are getting 5 percent less money than usual.

The Continuum of Care Program gives money to homeless assistance programs like housing and counseling services. It also funds emergency services to keep people off the street in the first place.

The budget squeezing that happened last year is now coming down the pipe into communities this year.

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Giving
8:20 am
Tue April 15, 2014

PhilanthroFest Held Again For Miami's Non-Profits

Estrellita Sibila started PhilanthroFest 3 years ago, it continues to connect non-profits in the community with people who want to get involved.
Credit Wilson Sayre

What do the Parks foundation of Miami Dade, The Awesome Foundation and the Wounded Worriers of South Florida all have in common? They were participants in the third annual PhilanthroFest held this weekend on Miami-Dade College’s Wolfson Campus in Downtown Miami.

People slathered on sunscreen, milled around the dozens of Little white tents and talked community engagement. 

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The Everglades
5:46 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Everglades Water Circulation Program Will Move Forward

Water may soon be flowing a bit easier in the Everglades.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Rasmus Bøgeskov Larsen

The South Florida Water Management District decided Thursday morning to OK an Everglades restoration project it designed.

Since 2011, the District has been working to develop a $1.9 billion plan to put some circulation back into the heart of the Everglades.

"It is going to require removing lot of things that have been put in," says Randy Smith, a representative for the Water District. "[It will require] creating new water-flow projects and water storage projects. The landscape is going to more closely resemble what it was originally."

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Hard To Hire
3:46 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Felons, Drop-Outs And The Poor: Broward Wants To Hire You

The Broward County Commission is trying to help out hard-to-hire people.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user 401(K) 2013

Felons, high-school dropouts and the poor might get a helping hand when looking for a job in Broward County.

The County Commission is considering an ordinance that would require contractors to try and give half of those new contract-related jobs to hard-to-hire people.

"Try" is the operative word.

The ordinance would not require contractors to actually hire these people. They just have to make a good faith effort to find someone who falls into the hard-to-hire category. 

 

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Miami Herald
3:13 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Miami Herald Has A New President And Publisher

Alex Villoch is the first woman to fill the position of publisher of the MIami Herald Media Company in its 110-year history.
Credit C.M. GUERRERO / EL NUEVO HERALD

The Miami Herald Media Company has a new president and publisher—and it didn't have to look too far. Alexandra Villoch, currently Senior Vice President for advertising, will start her new role on April 14th. The announcement was made to a receptive room mostly comprised of Herald employees.

Villoch is the first woman to fill the role in the company's 110-year history.

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Sea-Level Rise
10:40 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Why Sea-Level Rise Might Hurt Poor Neighborhoods More Than Coastal Areas

Some lower-income neighborhoods may be more vulnerable to the impacts of rising seas than coastal areas.
Credit Keren Bolter

Keren Bolter is a doctoral student of geosciences at Florida Atlantic University researching what areas in South Florida are particularly threatened by rising seas. She says all methods of analysis for the risks of sea-level rise only focus on financial vulnerability -- ranking Fort Lauderdale Beach and Miami Beach as high-risk -- but to her, that's not the whole story.

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Government
3:47 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Your Garage Sale Might Be Illegal

Yard sales in Miami must be permitted, but the city commission hopes making the permits free will encourage code compliance.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Mike Mozart

Weekends, of course, are prime time for garage sales. But it may surprise you that the sale must have a permit, otherwise it’s illegal.

The Miami City Commission voted Thursday to remove the $28.50 fee the permits used to cost, in the hopes that more people will toe the line.

Permitting for garage sales is nothing new; Coral Gables, North Miami, Ft. Lauderdale and Hollywood also require permitting.

In Miami you’re allowed up to 2 garage sales per year. But if you owe any fines because of code violations, you’ll have to settle up before a permit can be issued.

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Building Code
4:45 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

North Miami Bands Together For Housing Sweeps

North Miami is hoping its new team's "building inspection sweeps" will streamline code enforcement.
Credit City of North Miami

The North Miami Police Department, code enforcement teams and even parks and recreation are joining forces in what are being called “building inspection sweeps.” The city says going in together as a team helps streamline code enforcement.

Three months ago, the roof of an apartment building in North Miami collapsed, displacing over 250 people from their homes. Though that was not the impetus for creating this coalition, city representatives said they learned from the accident.

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Electronic Dance Music
9:58 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Waiting For The Drop: The Anatomy Of An EDM Song

This week people from around the world have come to Miami for Ultra and Winter Music Conference—all in the name of electronic dance music, or EDM.
Credit Creative Commons / Flickr user Tony Nungaray

Ultra Music Festival and Winter Music Conference bring to Miami the beats and bass of electronic dance music, or EDM. But if you don't get what all the noise is about, here we bring you an explainer, and below that, a short tutorial on making the beats so many are crazed for.

HOW TO MAKE ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC:

1. You start off with a simple four-beat bass drum. This is the basic head-nodding element.

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Living
3:45 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Miami's Poor Not So Segregated

Miami turns out to be one of the least segregated metro areas in the country.
Credit Illustration: Wilson Sayre, Photo: Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

Out of 51 large metro areas examined by The Atlantic Cities, Miami ranks 46th most segregated  by poverty. In other words, the city made the study's "least segregated" list.

The Atlantic Cities looked at 2010 Census data to determine if the poor were concentrated in pockets or sprinkled around a city. The study mentioned Miami's abundance of service-industry jobs as a possible explanation for the level of segregation of the poor.

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Soccer (or Football)
3:12 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Beckham Wants PortMiami

Renderings for Beckham's proposed stadium in PortMiami.
Credit Miami Beckham United

It’s official: David Beckham’s Major League Soccer group has announced it wants to build its stadium on the southwest corner of PortMiami. But there are concerns the road to complete the stadium in that location might be a bit congested.

With a view of the Miami skyline, the current conception of the stadium has about 24,000 seats. Which, for some downtown residents and port officials, equals cars -- a lot more cars.

But David Beckham’s real-estate advisor John Alschuler hoped to quell some of those concerns at a press conference Monday.

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