Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Is Krome Detention Center an immigration processing center or a prison for immigrants?

That’s the question University of Miami students looked at as part of a new traveling exhibit about incarceration in America called “States of Incarceration.”

The exhibit currently lines the walls of the Wesley Foundation gallery on the University of Miami Campus. Each panel of the exhibit tackles a question, like “who is the death penalty for?” and “does architecture shape punishment?”

Creative Commons

Why should a community fund free legal aid services for its low-income residents?

The Florida Bar Foundation is trying to make the case that these programs, which provide representation by civil legal aid advocates in cases directly affecting families, homes, incomes, jobs and access to vital services, should be funded because they are  good for the economy.

Florida Department of Corrections

Florida keeps inching closer to having a working death penalty in the state.

This week, the Senate Criminal Justice Committee overwhelmingly approved a measure that would now require a unanimous jury to sentence someone to death. The House Criminal Justice Subcommittee is slated to hear a similar bill on Feb. 15.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

What does it mean to be a man?

What does it mean to be a boy when you were born a girl?

marc cornelis / flickr

How are inmates supposed to transition to the world outside of prison? 

For one pre-release program at the Homestead Correctional Institution, the answer is in entrepreneurship. 

Creative Commons via Flickr / Daniel Reichert (https://flic.kr/p/7yrxNk)

What is the sound of Miami?

Is it this?

What about this?

Or this?

As part of a project 305,  the New World Symphony is asking residents to send in sound and video of what Miami is to them. The idea is to use those submissions to build a symphony for, to and from Miami, maybe with a little bit of love.

Florida Department of Corrections

Florida is one step closer to reinstating the death penalty.

After a year of turmoil for the state’s death penalty, one Florida legislator is trying to rein things in a bit. House Judiciary Chairman Chris Sprowls has proposed a bill that would bring the state’s death penalty in line with several state court and U.S. Supreme Court decisions that have thrown the sentence into limbo.

See WLRN's documentary about Florida's death penalty in limbo here.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Mark Goebel (https://flic.kr/p/5A7n4k)

A new bill under consideration by the Florida Legislature would make it easier for defendants to use the "Stand Your Ground" defense when faced with use of force charges. 

For years, Florida laws have  had provisions for self-defense immunity, protecting people who use force in self-defense from being prosecuted. There are certain restrictions on where and when you are justified in using various kind of force in self-defense.

COUNCIL ON AMERICAN-ISLAMIC RELATIONS

Three people were killed in 2015 because of what they looked like. In November 2016, signs saying “whites only” and “colored” were taped on the wall above water fountains at a Jacksonville high school.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Users: Adam Axon, USDA, William Warby and John Tann

What happens when you expose a Florida resident to mosquitoes, screw worms or gators?

Sammy Mack

This is the time of year when here at WLRN we like to look back at all the news that happened over the past year and remember the stories that we found especially entertaining – the stuff that got us laughing or shaking our heads around the newsroom.

It’s graduation time for some students, as classes wrap up for the holiday season. One such ceremony was held behind the razor wire and locked doors of Dade Correctional Institution in Homestead.

The graduation for the writing classes offered through Exchange for Change was held in the prison’s large recreation room, where murals of Disney characters look down on you. The gathering was a way to share and celebrate what the inmates accomplished over the past semester.

Creative Commons via Flickr / psyberartist (https://flic.kr/p/7xiU9C)

The manatee is a sort of Florida symbol - their squished noses and doughy bodies are just objectively one of the cutest things in our waters.

But this year boats have killed a record number of the sea cows, 98 in total. This beats the previous record set in 2009 when 97 were killed.

In total, 472 manatees have died in 2016, far fewer than the 830 in 2013, many from natural causes. The nature of 139 deaths is undetermined.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Buffing is what it’s called when you paint over someone else's work, erasing it. The Buff Daddy has been doing this for decades and he’s the guy people won’t see as they flock to Wynwood this Miami Art Week to see the new street art that’s going up on the walls of stores and warehouses.

Neil Case

When you sit in the passenger seat of DJ Billy E’s sky-blue van and he turns a few nobs on the console, tens of thousands of watts of bass are pushed out from a wall of subwoofers behind your head and crash down, not just on your ears, but on your entire body. It makes every little nose hair dance around and tickle. It’s hard to breathe there’s so much pressure. It is absolutely thrilling.

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