Wilson Sayre

Reporter

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Ways to Connect

C.M. GUERRERO / EL NUEVO HERALD

More money is coming to fight Zika.

On Thursday Governor Rick Scott announced that he would allocate $25 million dollars in state funds to help fight the mosquito-borne virus. This is in addition to the $36 million he has already allocated for combating the virus, which can cause severe birth defects.

The governor says the state must focus on finding a vaccine to protect pregnant women and their developing babies. Thus the latest funding from Scott is slated to go toward research into finding a vaccine and a more cost-effective way to test for the disease.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Solar energy is yet again a hot issue in the Sunshine State. Voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment in August giving tax relief to businesses that own or lease solar panels. Another solar amendment will be on Florida’s ballot in November.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

On opening night for the Marlins in April, it was Miami vs. the Detroit Tigers. As the booming voice in the stadium announced the lineup, a new guy walked from the bullpen onto the field: Number 54, Wei-Yin Chen, a native of Taiwan.

Diego Orlandini

Street art is by nature ephemeral. But a coloring book, of all things, is preserving some of the murals in Wynwood by asking the rest of us to add our own interpretations of the work with crayon, pencil or marker.

The pages are black and white versions of murals - both abstract and figurative. Some of the pages feature an entire mural,  others just a detailed section of a wall.

The coloring book’s creator, Diego Orlandini, said the first mention of a coloring book came from an ex-girlfriend.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Maybe there’s a park you remember from your childhood. And you may have seen it after renovations or upgrades and it’s just not quite the same.

Well, Rochnel Jean-Baptiste experienced that pretty early in life. She’s 14 now, and her park changed when she was 8.

She takes us on her journey to figure out why cities and counties change parks at all.

Google Maps

Miami changes very quickly. The city has only existed for little more than  a century and seems to constantly reinvent itself every decade.

But change can disrupt communities that have weathered those changes for a long time. The neighborhood of Overtown, in particular, has been in the middle of a lot of these changes over the years.

Jam’Mesha Briggs grew up in Overtown, went to school in Overtown and was surrounded by family who lived in Overtown. One day she had to move out.

She tells her story about what it’s like to be on the receiving end of gentrification.

You didn't have time to wait for the long list of results last night? Fear not.  The WLRN team has summarized the key takeaways of this primary election for South Florida. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Florida’s solar Amendment 4 passed with brilliant colors Tuesday. With only 60 percent needed to pass, the measure’s overwhelming support suggests, perhaps, a new direction for solar in the Sunshine State, a relatively untapped source of energy.

 

Creative Commons via Flickr / Joe Gratz (https://flic.kr/p/bkUna)

As South Florida voters go to the polls this week during early voting or at your precinct on election day Tuesday, you’ll see a bunch of judicial races listed on your ballot:

Miami-Dade 11th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 9, 34, 52, 66 and 74;

Broward 17th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 9, 15, 23 and 24

Palm Beach 15th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 1 and 4

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Miami-Dade County Judge Groups 5, 7, 15 and 35

Monroe County Judge Group 3

Broward County Judge Groups 2, 3, 7, 8, 13, 14 and 21

NOAA

People are looking a bit nervously at Invest 99L, the tropical disturbance heading up through the Bahamas.

Current projections have the storm making its way to South Florida by early next week, which, if you are a good citizen, should maybe strike a bell: Tuesday is election day.

So what happens to elections day if it also happens to be hurricane day?

Only the state has the authority to move or adjust voting times in light of things like weather or any other kind of interference.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

At noon on a cloudless day, the sun beats down on the rooftop of a Coconut Grove hotel. Daren Goldin, a solar contractor, walks around rows of solar panels installed at angles on the white roof. The sun’s reflection is almost blinding, like snow on a sunny day.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

South Florida’s Olympic Silver medal winner is back home.

Danell Leyva brought home a silver in high bar and another silver in parallel bars, both packed in red and white tube socks in his carry-on.

At the airport to meet his flight home were friends and family, also a few dozen young gymnasts from Universal Gymnastics, where Leyva started.

Clearly tired from everything that’s happened to him in the past few weeks, the 24-year-old said he said he’s happy to be home, if not a little overwhelmed.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

The Aug. 30 election will be  the first to host elections in  the newly redrawn state and federal congressional districts.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

“It's jail food, I feel like I’m in prison.

“It’s sometimes cold and salty. Sometimes it has no taste.”

“I look at the school lunch and don’t even eat it”

These are just a few of the comments Rachel Greig collected about very few people’s favorite meal: school lunch.

The Miami-Dade County high school junior talks about school lunch all the time with her younger brother and dad, an elementary school teacher. And always wondered why it didn’t meet her standards for a good meal.

Follow her journey to get some answers:

Creative Commons via Flickr / Victor Björkund (https://flic.kr/p/hPKtwF)

Everyone has a right to an education at least until high school, right?

As Anthony Espinoza found out, it’s not so simple, especially when you hit 16. At that age, young people can choose to drop out of school. But Anthony wanted back in school after he had to leave the magnet school he attended because his grades were suffering following dozens of absences and tardies.

Anthony tries to figure out exactly what happened to him and figure out what to do next. Listen to his story:

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