Tom Hudson

Vice president of news and special correspondent

In a journalism career covering news from high global finance to neighborhood infrastructure, Tom Hudson is the Vice President of News and Special Correspondent for WLRN.  He hosts and produces the Sunshine Economy and anchors the Florida Roundup in addition to leading the organization's news engagement strategy.

Hudson was most recently the co-anchor and managing editor of Nightly Business Report on Public Television. In that position Hudson reported on topics such as Federal Reserve interest rate policy, agriculture and global trade. Prior to co-anchoring NBR, he was host and managing editor of the nationally syndicated financial television program “First Business.” He overhauled the existing program leading to a 20 percent increase in distribution in his first year with the program.

Tom also reported and anchored market coverage for the groundbreaking web-based financial news service, WebFN. Beginning in 2001, WebFN was among the first live online streaming video outlets. While there he reported regularly from the Chicago Board Options Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade and the CME. Additionally, he created original business news and information programming for the investor channel of a large e-brokerage firm distributed to six large market CBS Radio stations. 

Before his jump to television and broadband, Tom co-anchored morning drive for the former all-news, heritage 50kw WMAQ-AM/Chicago. He spent the better part of a decade in general news as anchor, reporter, manager and talk show host in several markets covering a wide variety of stories and topics.

He has served as a member of the adjunct faculty in the Journalism Department of Columbia College Chicago and has been a frequent guest on other TV and radio programs as well as a guest speaker at universities on communications, journalism and business.

Tom writes a weekly column for the Miami Herald and the McClatchy-Tribune News Service. He appears regularly on KNX-AM/Los Angeles and WBBM-AM/Chicago for commentary on the economy and investment markets.

While Tom was co-anchoring and managing NBR, the program was awarded the 2012 Program of Excellence Award by American Public Television. Tom also has been awarded two National Press Foundation fellowships including one for the Wharton Seminars for Business Journalists in 2006. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Iowa and is the recipient of several professional honors and awards for his work in journalism.

He is married with two boys who tend to wake up early on the weekends.

Ways to Connect

While America has experienced a peaceful transition between presidents 44 times, there has never been a president-elect quite like Donald Trump.

 

For his supporters, including the 4.6 million Floridians who voted for him, Trump represents a change. Not just a change in which political party controls the White House, but a repudiation of decades of the political class on both sides of the aisle.

 

Like mangoes, snowbirds and hurricanes, even health insurance has a season and this is it -- open enrollment season. This is the time many companies give their employees a window to check out any changes to health care insurance plans, including how much more it will cost. It’s also the time Obamacare health insurance plans open on the federal government’s Healthcare.gov site for the 28 states using it, including Florida.

 

courtsey: Donald Goldberg

An adult aedes aegypti mosquito measures about six millimeters. That’s roughly a quarter of an inch. Yet for weeks this summer, it looked to threaten a $26 billion a year industry that underpins the South Florida economy -- tourism.

The bug remains a big public health worry -- so much so the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still recommends that pregnant women stay away from all of Miami-Dade County -- but it in its early months, hasn’t hurt tourism.

Brutal

But try telling that to Donald Goldberg, manager of the Wynwood Diner.

Tom Hudson

Through all the tawdry talk, accusations and innuendo during this election American voters have been consistent in saying the economy is their big issue.

 

The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, which includes South Florida in its territory, quizzed 200 companies throughout the region. One out of three of them said the election was having an effect on their business decisions such as investing in their companies or hiring new workers.

 

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

It has been more than two months since the Zika virus was found in Miami-Dade County and almost three-fourths of voters surveyed in a new WLRN-Univision 23 poll are satisfied with the response by county government.

Facebook.com/MayorGimenez

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez appears to be easily coasting to a second term in a run-off election.

In a new WLRN - Univision 23 survey by Bendixen and Amandi International of Miami-Dade County registered voters Gimenez leads his opponent Raquel Regalado by double digits.

A new WLRN/Univision 23 survey finds Hillary Clinton is viewed better among registered Miami-Dade County voters than she is nationwide and Donald Trump's efforts to appeal to black voters has fallen flat. It also shows Hispanic voters are divided regarding Clinton, but not regarding Trump.

SCROLL DOWN FOR U.S. SENATE RACE RESULTS

Here are the results of the survey for president conducted in English and Spanish of 600 Miami-Dade County registered voters.

David Santiago / Miami Herald

Republican Carlos Curbelo and Democrat Joe Garcia showed on Thursday evening why the race to represent the southernmost congressional district is one of the most closely watched in the country.

“I have to give Mr. Garcia credit. His campaigns are getting better. In 2010 they had the straw candidate. In 2012 they had absentee ballot fraud. This year they’re just lying. Hopefully they will stop there,” Curbelo said 

Garcia countered, invoking the top Republican on the ticket. “It’s this type of Trump-like behavior in a campaign that he’s doing. Time and again.”

athrasher/flickr

Floridians are anxious. Even after several years of job growth, most are worried about the economy. Two out of three Floridians say they are financially stressed. For those with a child at home, or living in South Florida, odds are even higher.

Teresa Frontado

There is no Election Day. Between mail-in ballots, early voting and the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November, Florida voters have almost a month to make their decisions and cast their ballots.

This is the most contentious campaign season in memory, yet business goes on. Boat repairs, restaurants, banking -- you name it. Commerce continues despite the uncertainty of the election.

The economy consistently ranks as the biggest issue for most Americans. Taxes, regulations, health care, immigration even the combative tone of this election -- does the uncertainty of this election threaten to hurt or help business?

These four teenagers spent their summer with WLRN News. They each reported personal stories focused on a place: a park, a torn-down apartment building, school, etc.
Wilson Sayre

"To get out and explore more things," is how Rochnel Jean-Baptiste described her desire to eventually leave Miami after she finishes school. Jean-Baptiste was one of four teenagers who participated in WLRN's 2016 Youth Radio program.

It's the most teenage of desires -- to explore more things -- isn't it?

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

In 2012, Florida’s election results were decided by less than one percent. In 2000, fewer than 600 votes separated the candidates.

Today, Florida remains a swing state, with an especially high number of registered independents.

One in four registered voters in the state don’t declare any political party, making it the fastest growing political class in Florida.

So, who exactly are Florida's swing voters?

It has been four months since WLRN launched Pricecheck, an online guide to bring clarity to health care costs in Florida. Along with our partners WUSF in Tampa and Health News Florida and with input from our audience, we created a searchable database of prices of common health care procedures and supplies aiming to answer a single question: "How much does it cost?"

Essay

Dwyane Wade is leaving. After 13 years with the Miami Heat, Wade is leaving the only NBA team he has known. He’s leaving, like LeBron James did two years ago, to return home. In Wade’s case, he’s headed to the Chicago Bulls -- a team he grew up with as a kid in the southern suburbs of that city.

Chicago is a city I spent almost 15 years in before moving to South Florida. Like Wade, I know both places well. They are both special places for those of us lucky to have lived and love them both.

  Miami is the Magic City.

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