Tom Hudson

Vice president of news and special correspondent

In a journalism career covering news from high global finance to neighborhood infrastructure, Tom Hudson is the Vice President of News and Special Correspondent for WLRN.  He hosts and produces the Sunshine Economy and anchors the Florida Roundup in addition to leading the organization's news engagement strategy.

Hudson was most recently the co-anchor and managing editor of Nightly Business Report on Public Television. In that position Hudson reported on topics such as Federal Reserve interest rate policy, agriculture and global trade. Prior to co-anchoring NBR, he was host and managing editor of the nationally syndicated financial television program “First Business.” He overhauled the existing program leading to a 20 percent increase in distribution in his first year with the program.

Tom also reported and anchored market coverage for the groundbreaking web-based financial news service, WebFN. Beginning in 2001, WebFN was among the first live online streaming video outlets. While there he reported regularly from the Chicago Board Options Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade and the CME. Additionally, he created original business news and information programming for the investor channel of a large e-brokerage firm distributed to six large market CBS Radio stations. 

Before his jump to television and broadband, Tom co-anchored morning drive for the former all-news, heritage 50kw WMAQ-AM/Chicago. He spent the better part of a decade in general news as anchor, reporter, manager and talk show host in several markets covering a wide variety of stories and topics.

He has served as a member of the adjunct faculty in the Journalism Department of Columbia College Chicago and has been a frequent guest on other TV and radio programs as well as a guest speaker at universities on communications, journalism and business.

Tom writes a weekly column for the Miami Herald and the McClatchy-Tribune News Service. He appears regularly on KNX-AM/Los Angeles and WBBM-AM/Chicago for commentary on the economy and investment markets.

While Tom was co-anchoring and managing NBR, the program was awarded the 2012 Program of Excellence Award by American Public Television. Tom also has been awarded two National Press Foundation fellowships including one for the Wharton Seminars for Business Journalists in 2006. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Iowa and is the recipient of several professional honors and awards for his work in journalism.

He is married with two boys who tend to wake up early on the weekends.

Ways to Connect

Tom Hudson

Cesar Cardoza likes a glass of very cold water when he is working. Cardoza is a translator used to working during live, high-profile events. About 15 feet behind the stage at Miami-Dade College's Kendall campus where Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were taking part in a Democratic presidential debate Wednesday night sat Cardoza and his group of translators. Each one of them had a role to play. Cardoza was Sanders.

"You can call it a performance. This is not a science. This is an art," said Cardoza.

When Florida lawmakers gathered in Tallahassee on Day 1 of the 2016 legislative session, Gov.  Rick Scott was clear with his two top priorities: $1 billion in tax cuts and $250 million for the state's economic development agency Enterprise Florida. As the final day of the regular session approaches this week, lawmakers are poised to disappoint the governor on both efforts.

Tom Hudson

Consistently, voters say the economy is one of the top issues in the race for the White House. It ranks higher than any social issue, gun rights or immigration. If Florida voters are anything like voters elsewhere, it’s the economy that is the big issue as early voting in the state's presidential preference primary begins.

University of Florida

The story of modern South Florida is a story of fighting bugs.

Conquering South Florida’s landscape meant tolerating pests of all kinds that are fed by our sunny, moist climate. Those are the same features that inspired Henry Flagler to bring his railroad south from Palm Beach and for Napoleon Bonaparte Broward's promise to drain the Everglades.

Ramon Espinosa / Associated Press

This week, the White House announced President Obama and the First Lady will visit Cuba.

The trip will include meetings with a Castro as well as with Cuban entrepreneurs.

The decision for a presidential trip to Cuba comes with all the historic overtones that have accompanied the changing relationship between America and Cuba since late 2014 when the president announced a new strategy of engagement. It also came with the familiar criticism of the efforts.  We discuss the history and controversy surrounding the trip.

So far, Floridians have been spared, but not for too much longer. On March 15, registered Republicans and Democrats in Florida will make their preference known for president. (Early voting actually begins, well, earlier.) The candidates, their campaigns and the political advertising are coming to Florida.

Chabeli Herrera

If Latin America gets the economic flu, could South Florida catch a cold? The regional economy is closely linked to South America. Brazil is in the second year of an economic recession. Venezuela is in an economic depression and Colombia's economy has slowed down.

 

Hear from four South American capitals about economic optimism despite the steep drop in copper prices in Chile and Peru,  the hopefulness in Colombia after a few sluggish years and  the deep depression in Venezuela.

 

Gage Skidmore/Flickr

This week, a group of 15 South Florida mayors, from West Palm Beach south to Cutler Bay signed a letter sent to Senator Rubio calling on him to "acknowledge the reality and urgency of climate change."

The mayors want Senator Rubio to address a federal plan regarding climate change and, specifically, the threat of rising sea level in South Florida.

Tom Hudson

  Nobody would give Ian MacDonald a job when he came to Fort Lauderdale more than 30 years ago, so he says he started a company.

 

MacDonald was born in England, raised in Nigeria and now runs a company that makes underwater lights for boats.  Today, he has 11 employees, nine of whom are based in Fort Lauderdale. The combination sales office, showroom, and assembly area is in a small industrial park cradled in the northeast corner of the I-95/ I-595 exchange.

 

tallahassee.com

For almost two years, Uber and and Lyft have all but ignored the rules regulating the taxi industry and operated anyway.

Last year, Palm Beach and Broward counties okayed a set of rules making transportation network companies -- as they call themselves --- legal. This week, Miami-Dade took the first step toward doing the same.

It's actually the second time the Miami-Dade commission has moved toward allowing Uber and others to operate legally. The first effort was successfully stopped by the taxi industry.

The U.S. Supreme Court says Florida’s practice of deciding if someone gets the death penalty is unconstitutional. What does this mean for the almost 400 people on Florida’s death row? Will the legislature try to change the process?

The first flight of Cuban migrants stuck in Costa Rica landed in El Salvador this week … as they hope to come to the U.S. In Washington, Senator and Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio filed legislation to change the benefits Cuban immigrants get when they make it to the U.S.

courtsey

When one thinks of real estate in South Florida, one probably thinks of the housing market. That wouldn’t be wrong, but the other big slice of real estate -- and one with the cranes and big construction projects -- is coming off a big year.  Last year South Florida saw more than a dozen commercial real estate deals of more than $100 million dollars.  Billions of dollars of office buildings, condo buildings, shopping malls and warehouses were bought and sold throughout the region. Can the boom continue?

Warren Zanes first heard Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers as an 11-year-old in New Hampshire. By the time Zanes was 18, he was touring and recording with his own band, The Del Fuegos. Zanes' band opened for Petty and the Heartbreakers before they broke up. Zanes went on to get a Ph.D., work with The Rock and Roll Museum and Hall of Fame and become executive director of Steven Van Zandt's Rock and Roll Forever Foundation.

“Hello there” - the email started. “There is something you should know about, taking place tomorrow of 12-17-15 - Thursday.”

That was the email message received by the Houston Independent School District. A similar email came into the inboxes of school officials here in South Florida.

The emails threatened to blow up school buildings with pressure cookers bombs.

Author Salman Rushdie lived for a decade with a price on his head. His book “The Satanic Verses” prompted the Iranian Ayatollah to issue a fatwa -- a call for all Muslims to kill Rushdie.

In this episode, I ask him to imagine his life and writing without such a threat. Listen to Rushdie discuss how it's impacted his writing, which is also shaped by urban life in his home cities of Mumbai (which he still calls Bombay), London and New York.

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