Tom Goldman

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his more than 20 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Update at 3:15 p.m. ET: Ali's Funeral Set For Friday Muhammad Ali, the man considered the greatest boxer of all time, died late Friday at a hospital in Phoenix at age 74. He was battling respiratory problems. He died of septic shock related to natural causes, with his family at his bedside, according to family spokesman Bob Gunnell. Ali inspired millions by standing up for his principles during the volatile 1960s and by always entertaining — in the boxing ring and in front of a microphone....

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: It is about as exciting as college basketball gets without the sweat and squeaking sneakers and school bands. Of course, we're talking about the televised selection shows picking the teams for the men's and women's Division I tournaments. Yesterday was Selection Sunday for the men. Selection Monday for the women is today. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us now. Good morning. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: All right. So if you are sick of politics, we have a couple of big sports stories for you today. First, one of pro football's greatest players is saying goodbye to the game. Denver Broncos' quarterback Peyton Manning announced his retirement 18 years after playing his first game in the NFL and a month after winning the Super Bowl. Also today, a major announcement from top-ranked tennis player Maria...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: World soccer's governing body, FIFA, picks a new president tomorrow. Five men are competing to succeed the longtime leader, Sepp Blatter. He resigned last year amid a corruption investigation of top FIFA officials that continues to this day. Depending on whom you ask, tomorrow's election is either a critical moment for FIFA or a waste of time. Here's NPR's Tom Goldman. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Every...

Sunday's Super Bowl 50 — Carolina Panthers versus the Denver Broncos — could mark the end of an era. Peyton Manning's last game. The veteran Broncos quarterback turns 40 next month. After a season plagued by injury and poor play, many suggested it was time to retire. Manning fueled speculation about his future after Denver won the AFC Championship game and microphones heard him tell New England head coach Bill Belichick, "This may be my last rodeo." In the run-up to the Super Bowl, Manning...

The education at the Rose City Rowing Club starts long before oars touch the water. The first lesson from head coach Nick Haley is about punctuality. Afternoon practice begins at 4 o'clock sharp at this club in Portland, Ore. The next lesson is about respect. This one's a big deal at Rose City: Respect your fellow teammates, coaches, the sport itself and — today in particular — the equipment. Haley is speaking to more than 100 high school students gathered before him. He notes that several of...

It's the offseason for Major League Baseball, but big news is coming soon. Commissioner Rob Manfred says he will decide by the end of the month whether to reinstate Pete Rose. The former perennial All-Star for the Cincinnati Reds is one of the greatest players ever; many consider his record for most hits in a career — 4,256 — untouchable. Rose, of course, has also been baseball's most celebrated pariah. He was banned in 1989 for betting on the game. Rose has campaigned for reinstatement in...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: All right. This is an important day for thousands of former NFL players who are waiting to get compensated for brain damage they suffered on the job. Payments from a massive concussion lawsuit settlement have been on hold for months since a small group of players appealed the settlement. Today in Philadelphia, a three-judge panel will hear arguments for and against that appeal, as NPR's Tom Goldman...

In football, a sport that demands military-style discipline and singular focus, there's ample precedent for speaking out against the status quo. What happened at the University of Missouri in recent days, with African-American football players calling for a boycott with the support of coaches, is dramatic, but it's the kind of action that was quite common around 50 years ago, according to historian Lane Demas, a professor at Central Michigan University. "There's a three-year period of roughly...

Baseball is a team sport. But as the Kansas City Royals and New York Mets prepare to play Game 1 of the World Series tonight, there's a tremendous amount of focus on one player in particular. And the spotlight is on New York second baseman Daniel Murphy for good reason. Murphy, 30, who has played for the Mets his entire major league career, is on an unprecedented postseason hitting streak. Murphy has hit a home run in a record six straight games. He has seven homers overall in the playoffs...

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: The investigation continues into the how and why a gunman killed nine people on a community college campus in Roseburg, Ore., last Thursday. Authorities now say 26-year-old Chris Harper-Mercer killed himself after exchanging gunfire with police. As more details emerge, NPR's Tom Goldman reports that some residents of the small town are struggling for a bit of normalcy. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Which meant...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Authorities in Roseburg, Ore., have identified the nine people who died yesterday in this country’s latest mass shooting. The victims range in ages from 18 to 67. They died when a gunman opened fire on the campus of Umpqua Community College in Roseburg. There’s also news today about the investigation of the attack, which left the gunman dead as well. NPR’s Tom Goldman is in Roseburg and filed this report...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: OK, some tennis news now. So spoiler alert - Italian Flavia Pennetta has won the women's final at the U.S. Open. She defeated fellow Italian Roberta Vinci in straight sets. Tomorrow, Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer will face off in the men's final and all eyes will again be on Arthur Ashe Stadium. Well, NPR's Tom Goldman is at the tournament, and he's also had his eyes on some of the more overlooked...

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