Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Germany's interior minister confirmed Sunday that his country would impose temporary controls on its border, halting trains between Austria and Germany for a 12-hour period to stem the flow of refugees flooding into Munich.

"The aim of these measures is to limit the current inflows to Germany and to return to orderly procedures when people enter the country," Thomas de Maiziere said at a news conference.

Cosmonaut Gennady Padalka's safe return from months aboard the International Space Station has put him in the record books for spending more time in space than any other human — the equivalent of nearly two and a half years on five different flights.

Padalka, whose latest 168-day stay on the ISS gives him a total of 879 days in space, has smashed the previous record, which was set by fellow Russian Sergei Krikalev in 2005, by two months .

Germany's southern city of Munich was expecting 10,000 migrants to arrive by train in a single day, with officials saying that 40,000 in all could arrive in the next few days.

By this morning in Munich, 3,600 had already arrived.

Chancellor Angela Merkel, facing criticism at home, said taking in asylum seekers was "the right thing to do" even as her deputy warned that the country was "reaching the limits" over how many refugees it could take.

Left-wing British MP Jeremy Corbyn has been elected in a landslide to head the country's Labour Party.

As the BBC explains:

"Mr Corbyn, who began the contest as a rank outsider, saw off a challenge from frontbenchers Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper and Liz Kendall.

"He gained 251,417 or 59.5% of first preference votes - his nearest rival, Mr Burnham, got 19%.

"Ms Cooper was third on 17% and Ms Kendall a distant fourth with 4.5% of the vote."

Egypt's Prime Minister Ibrahim Mehleb has stepped down along with his cabinet, apparently bowing to pressure from a corruption probe that saw the arrest of his agriculture minister last week.

President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi accepted Mehleb's resignation.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

A pair of explosions at a restaurant in the state of Madhya Pradesh, that have apparently been traced to gas cylinders, killed more than 60 people, officials say. Some reports say the death toll is at least 89. Dozens of others were injured.

NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you four items.

From NPR Washington Desk correspondent Brian Naylor:

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake — who battled criticism over her handling of riots earlier this year in the wake of the death in police custody of Freddie Gray — said Friday that she will not seek re-election in 2016.

Democrat Rawlings-Blake, 45, made the announcement during a morning news conference, citing her desire to concentrate on rebuilding efforts in the city in the wake of the April riots.

Two Tea Party Republican lawmakers in Michigan are gone today — one resigned, another expelled — after their alleged extramarital affair and a botched cover-up became national news last month.

Michigan state Rep. Todd Courser announced his resignation at 3:12 a.m. today after hours of debate in the state Legislature over whether to force him out of the body.