Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 11:05 p.m. ET

Tropical Storm Erika has caused extensive flooding and landslides on the eastern Caribbean island of Dominica, killing at least four people and cutting power and water to many residents.

The storm dumped 9 inches of rain on the mountainous island late Wednesday.

"The situation is grim. It is dangerous," Ian Pinard, Dominica's communications minister, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying.

A decade after Hurricane Katrina — the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history — President Obama told a crowd in New Orleans that the storm was a "man-made" calamity that had as much to do with economic inequality and the failure of government as it did the forces of nature.

"What started out as a natural disaster became a man-made disaster — a failure of government to look out for its own citizens," the president said in a speech at a newly opened community center in the Lower Ninth Ward, a predominantly black neighborhood that was devastated by Katrina.

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

Pakistan could have 350 nuclear warheads sometime in the next decade, becoming the world's No. 3 nuclear power by outpacing rival India and several other nations in bomb-making, according to a new report issued by two think tanks.

At least 20 migrants were found dead in a truck on Thursday in eastern Austria, apparently from suffocation. Police said the number could be as high as 50.

The food-delivery truck was found along Austria's A4 autobahn near the town of Parndorf, which is not far from the border with Hungary and Slovakia.

"We can assume that it could be 20 people who died. It could also be 40, it could be 50 people," an unnamed police official was quoted by Reuters as saying.

A day after storming past border checkpoints aimed at keeping them out of the European Union, thousands of migrants — most from Syria, but also some from Iraq and Afghanistan — crowded buses in Macedonia heading north toward the Serbian border.

Most of them are hoping to travel via Hungary into northern Europe.

Updated 4:00 a.m. ET Monday:

French President Francois Hollande on Monday pinned the three Americans and a British man with the Legion of Honor medal. According to The Associated Press: Hollande said the men showed "that faced with terror, we have the power to resist. You also gave a lesson in courage, in will, and thus in hope."

Original Post:

The British embassy in Tehran has been reopened for the first time since it was attacked by "students" and forced to close nearly four years ago.

The BBC reports: "[Foreign Secretary Philip] Hammond attended a ceremony in Tehran with Iranian diplomats to mark the reopening while Iran will reopen its embassy in London later."

As we reported at the end of November 2011:

Ayoub El-Khazzani, the 26-year-old Moroccan who was tackled and subdued by passengers aboard a high-speed train in Belgium, reportedly had raised concern in three European countries for his supposed ties to radical Islamists and possible travel to Syria.

The Associated Press quotes an unnamed official as saying he had been on the radar of authorities in France, Belgium and Spain. But officials have yet to provide a clear motive for the attack.

The Italian coast guard says it is in the process of trying to rescue as many as 3,000 migrants after receiving distress calls from a flotilla of four boats and 14 rubber dinghies off the coast of Libya.

The BBC reports:

"At least 1,200 people have already been rescued from five of the boats, in one of the largest such operations to date.

"The route from Libya to Italy is one of the busiest for migrants trying to enter Europe."

A suicide car bomb targeting a convoy in the Afghan capital has killed a dozen people, including three American contractors, NATO say. Scores of others were wounded.

The attack, which wounded 66 people, took place in Kabul's Macrorayan neighborhood, what The Associated Press describes as "a Soviet-built housing estate lined with shops, hospitals and schools."

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