Sarah Mueller

Sarah Mueller is the first recipient of the WFSU Media Capitol Reporting Fellowship. She’ll be covering the 2017 Florida legislative session and recently earned her master’s degree in Public Affairs Reporting at the University of Illinois Springfield. Sarah was part of the Illinois Statehouse press corps as an intern for NPR Illinois in 2016. When not working, she enjoys playing her yellow lab, watching documentaries and reading memoirs.

Many people considered the rhetoric during 2016 campaign cycle brutal. After voters elected Donald Trump as president, the Southern Poverty Law Center reported more than a thousand hate incidents of white nationalism and harassment of minority groups.

Florida is leading the country in signing up for federal health insurance coverage for 2017 according to federal figures. With still about a month left in the open enrollment period, the numbers are expected to grow even as the Republican-controlled Congress plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act as early as this week.

Floridians are enthusiastic about the economy and their personal budgets. That’s according to a survey by the University of Florida. Consumer confidence among Floridians surged up 6.9 points this month to 97.2, according to a news release. The high mark shows people in the state are as hopeful about the future as they were before the Great Recession and housing crisis in 2008.

Florida transportation officials are alerting residents emails asking for traffic violation payments are a scam.

Groups of protestors swarmed in front of the Florida State Senate chamber Monday, calling for the state’s 29 electors to flip their vote from President-elect Donald Trump. But as expected, electors stayed the course.

The battle over the next U.S. president took to the Tallahassee streets Saturday. A group of protestors at the state capitol called on Florida’s 29 electors not to vote for President-elect Donald Trump ahead of today’s vote.

Having private insurance companies manage Florida’s Medicaid services instead of the state has been successful, said the Agency for Health Care Administration. But long-term care providers and advocacy groups disagree and they outlined problems to Florida senators on Wednesday.

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