Samantha Raphelson

Azzedine Alaia, the French-Tunisian designer known for his figure-sculpting fashions, has died at 77, the French Federation of Haute Couture and Fashion confirmed on Saturday.

In his more than four decades in the fashion industry, Alaia gained a reputation for going rogue; he refused to follow the calendar of international fashion weeks and released his collections only when he was ready. He rose to fame for his body-hugging designs that celebrated the female form.

The Palestinians threatened on Saturday to cease communication with the United States if the White House closes its diplomatic mission in Washington, D.C., lodging a potential thorn in President Trump's plans for Mideast peace.

The State Department says the office of the Palestine Liberation Organization must close under a little-known provision in U.S. law that forbids it from requesting Israelis be prosecuted for crimes against Palestinians. Trump may reverse the closure within 90 days if the Palestinians prove they are engaging in peace negotiations with the Israelis.

Tens of thousands of euphoric Zimbabweans marched through the country's capital on Saturday to celebrate what may be the near end of President Robert Mugabe's reign.

Mugabe, one of Africa's last living independence leaders, had been in power for nearly four decades, until this week when the military ousted him in what it is describing as a "bloodless correction."

Ferdie Pacheco, the ringside physician to Muhammad Ali and TV commentator known in the boxing world as the "fight doctor," died Thursday, his daughter announced on Facebook. He was 89.

A Saudi-led blockade of Yemen continues to exacerbate a humanitarian crisis that aid groups are calling the most severe in decades.

The continuing blackouts in Puerto Rico after Hurricanes Irma and Maria have overshadowed the devastation in the neighboring U.S. Virgin Islands, where nearly 73 percent of residents remain without power two months after the Category 5 storms made landfall.

The Trump administration this week began dismantling a longstanding humanitarian program known as Temporary Protected Status, leaving hundreds of thousands of Central American immigrants living in heightened fear of deportation.

The FBI's failure to unlock the cellphone of the Texas church shooter is reigniting the debate over encryption and government access to secured communications.

Earlier this week, FBI Special Agent Christopher Combs blamed the industry standard encryption for blocking investigators' ability to crack the PIN code on the gunman's device.

Software exists to thwart a passcode, but if forced, investigators run the risk of erasing all of the phone's data. The FBI sent the Texas gunman's phone to its lab in Quantico, Va., to try to determine another method.

Walruses are facing a "death sentence" after the Trump administration declined last month to list the Pacific walrus as endangered, according to the Center for Biological Diversity.

The conservation group, which took legal action starting in 2008 to get walruses on the list, says the White House's decision puts the species in a dire state as it confronts the effects of climate change.

President Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency on Thursday, freeing up resources to deal with the epidemic.

Last year, more than 64,000 people died from drug overdoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics. Many of those overdoses were from heroin, prescription painkillers, fentanyl and other opioids.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is notorious for what is known as the Kansas experiment, a bold effort to assert the power of limited government.

In 2012, the Republican governor pushed reforms through the state Legislature that dramatically cut income taxes across the board. Brownback boasted the plan would deliver a "shot of adrenaline" to the Kansas economy.

But the opposite happened.

The widow of Army Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the four U.S. soldiers killed in a military operation in Niger earlier this month, says President Trump's condolence call only made her feel worse.

Families of fallen service members have been thrust into the spotlight in ways they never have before, says Bonnie Carroll, president and founder of TAPS, which stands for Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors, a charity that offers services to Gold Star families.

In Northern California, two intoxicants are king — wine and weed.

Both products drive the $3.2 billion-a-year tourism industry in Napa and Sonoma counties. But as wildfires continue to rage through the region this week, marijuana growers and winemakers are struggling to keep their crops safe.

President Trump announced on Friday that he will not recertify the Iran nuclear deal.

The president has long promised to withdraw the U.S. from the agreement, which he has called the "worst deal ever." Withdrawing presidential certification to Congress does not take the U.S. out of the deal itself, but it creates an opening for Congress to do so.

Lawmakers could reimpose sanctions on Iran that would break the deal. But key Congressional leaders say they are hesitant to do that or upend the agreement at least for now.

More than two weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico, the island's power grid remains in shambles, and authorities say it will take months to fully restore electricity.

Nearly 90 percent of the island is still without power, which means millions of people remain without electricity weeks after the storm, says José H. Román Morales, president of Puerto Rico's Energy Commission, which regulates the island's electric power authority.

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