Ryan Benk

Ryan Benk is originally from Miami, Florida and came to Tallahassee to attend Florida State University. He worked on Miami Dade College’s Arts and Literature Magazine- Miamibiance Magazine and has published poetry and a short film called “The Writer.” He’s currently working as the Newsroom’s Researcher while finishing his Creative Writing Bachelor’s Degree at Florida State University. When he’s not tracking down news, Ryan likes watching films, writing fiction and poetry, and exploring Florida.

A month after the U.S. Coast Guard released its final report on the sinking of cargo freighter El Faro, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson said he plans to file legislation.

But Nelson isn’t clear on exactly when or what kinds of measures he’d like to see implemented legislatively for a safer shipping industry.


A federal Food and Drug Administration advisory committee Wednesday recommended approval of a new injectable treatment for opioid addiction.

One Jacksonville addiction specialist participated in the drug trial that the panel examined data from.


Ninety-four percent of Floridians live in areas experiencing more extreme heat days a year, according to a new study published Tuesday by the Natural Resources Defense Council.  


As Jacksonville residents grapple with whether to remove the city’s Confederate monuments a group of area high school students are offering a more conciliatory alternative to the normally fractious debate among adults.


The brother of one of El Faro’s able bodied seamen who died when the ship went down is speaking out after the release of a 200-page report from the U.S. Coast Guard’s Marine Board of Investigation.


Residents on the First Coast are being encouraged to apply for federal disaster relief online or by phone after Hurricane Irma left behind damaged homes, record flooding, and power outages.

Those without internet or telephone access can also get help in person at a number of pop-up Federal Emergency Management Agency centers.


Northeast Floridians still waiting for federal recovery dollars a year after Hurricane Matthew may need to wait even longer, after Hurricane Harvey devastated Texas last week.


Imagine being stranded without a ride to the doctor or arriving hours late to medical appointments that your life literally depends on. Those are Florida patients’ most common grievances with a company the state pays to arrange medical transportation for people with disabilities.  


After battling for years over how to make healthcare more accessible and affordable, Florida lawmakers landed on a compromise. Instead of expanding Medicaid to cover more people, they decided during last year’s session to attack the cost of care directly, creating a database to make procedure pricing transparent.

Executives who ran the company that owned and operated the cargo ship El Faro will testify about the ship’s operation as the company seeks to limit its liability in federal court.

That’s after a judge’s ruling Wednesday.  


A Central Florida marijuana dispensary made its first delivery to a Jacksonville patient Tuesday — the same day a constitutional amendment goes into effect that will make more types of medical cannabis available to Floridians.

Knox Medical is one of a handful of Florida dispensaries that have been allowed to open under a 2014 law.

State medical authorities revoked the medical license of an “integrative medicine” doctor Thursday for his role in the death of a college student from untreated cancer.

A new state telehealth panel met in Jacksonville Tuesday to begin studying the state of distance medicine in Florida.


Northeast Florida residents are getting help cleaning up after Hurricane Matthew from federal relief workers, national guardsmen, local police and city officials.

Help is also coming from national charities like America’s Disaster Relief.


Florida congressional delegates are calling on the federal government to recalculate the Sunshine State’s share of new Zika response money.

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