Rowan Moore Gerety

Reporter

Before coming to WLRN, Rowan worked as a reporter for Northwest Public Radio in Washington State, where he produced a documentary for Latino USA on the tense relationship between the Yakama Nation and the Mexican American community that has become a majority on tribal lands.

He has written for The AtlanticSlate, and Foreign Policy, among others, and produced radio for NPR, The World, and Marketplace.

Rowan studied anthropology at Columbia University, was a 2011-2012 Fulbright Scholar in Mozambique. Read more of his work at rowanmg.com.

Ways to Connect

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

As their constituents took to the streets with pots and pans to celebrate Fidel Castro’s death, South Florida’s Cuban-American congressional delegation blasted the Obama administration for the brief diplomatic opening that preceded the dictator’s death.

“The largest financier of Castro right now, has become the Obama administration,” Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart told reporters at a Miami press conference. 

Sarah Gonzalez / Stateimpact/NPR

Education Secretary John King addressed a letter to school administrators around the country Monday urging them to abandon corporal punishment of students. 

Students from Miami Dade College’s Homestead campus and several area high schools staged a walkout Wednesday to protest the immigration proposals of President-elect Donald Trump. The students rallied outside Homestead City Hall to push for an ordinance to declare Homestead a “Sanctuary City"  and ask administrators to make each of their schools so-called sanctuary campuses.

Associated Press

Miami’s Janet Reno,  the first woman to be United States attorney general, died Monday at 78 from complications connected to Parkinson’s disease.

Her eight-year tenure in that office brought some of the country's most high-profile issues to her desk including the seizure and return of Elián González to Cuba, the capture of the Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski and the 51-day Waco siege standoff in which 76 people died.

Graphic: WLRN


Eighteen-year-old Summer Elnowno has been waiting to vote for a long time. When her birthday arrived in May, she recalled,  “Finally, I had the chance to voice my opinion somewhere. But the 2016 presidential race has been a dispiriting coming of age.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

It's 12 noon on a school day in November: 12th grader Beltran Arellanes should be in his AP government class at MAST Academy, a magnet school and one of the highest-ranked high schools in Florida. Instead, he's walking into a Donald Trump rally at Bayfront Park Amphitheater in Miami, along with his ninth grade sister Casilda.

ITT Tech materials, courtesy of Waltter Teruel

Before he moved to Miami, Waltter Teruel sold antiques and life insurance in New York. Working as a recruiter at ITT Technical Institute in Hialeah was a welcome change. “I mean, if you’re a salesperson, you have to lie through your teeth,” he said, “but in this case, it’s one of the sales where you actually don’t have to lie at some point.”

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

“How long have you been in pain?” asks Nurse Marsha Eloi, sitting in a makeshift health clinic in Camp Perrin, one of dozens of towns visited by the wreckage of Hurricane Matthew earlier this month.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Thirteen-year-old Ivana Fenelon walked up to me outside a church and primary school in Camp Perrin the week after Hurricane Matthew had leveled most of the homes in Pérénie, the rural hamlet where she lives with her family, a three-hour walk into the mountains. “I want to talk too,” she said, as I finished an interview about the hurricane with a farmer from another nearby town.

“What he’s saying is important,” she explained. “There must be some things that are very painful for him that he’s telling you about, so I’ll talk too.”

Hurricane Matthew leveled close to half the homes in Goyave, Haiti, and ripped the roofs off many more. Wind flattened groves of plantain trees and water carried away most of the community’s livestock.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

A year ago, Miami-Dade County Public Schools made a splash by eliminating out-of-school suspensions. At the time, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho cited research saying sending kids home made them fall behind in school and made them more likely to get into trouble again.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

In the Haitian town of Camp Perrin this week, Fanesse Saintsur was taking apart a section of roofing that flew off the store where he works, rafters and all.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Some of Hurricane Matthew's most gut-wrenching stories are coming out of the coastal city of Jérémie on Haiti's southwest peninsula – the region hardest hit.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Flooded construction sites were quiet and gas pumps were still wrapped in plastic throughout much of Broward County Friday morning. But many South Florida residents emerged from their cocoons and returned to work after Hurricane Matthew passed them by.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Nearly 300 emergency management personnel reported for duty at the Broward County Emergency Operations Center Thursday—all expecting hot meals and working air conditioning along with high-speed internet and a clean place to use the bathroom.

There’s a whole team that contributes to that effort. The woman in charge is Adrienne Britto, who walks the floors with a green blouse and a keen eye for detail.

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