Rowan Moore Gerety

Reporter

Before coming to WLRN, Rowan worked as a reporter for Northwest Public Radio in Washington State, where he produced a documentary for Latino USA on the tense relationship between the Yakama Nation and the Mexican American community that has become a majority on tribal lands.

He has written for The AtlanticSlate, and Foreign Policy, among others, and produced radio for NPR, The World, and Marketplace.

Rowan studied anthropology at Columbia University, was a 2011-2012 Fulbright Scholar in Mozambique. Read more of his work at rowanmg.com.

Ways to Connect

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

  You know you’re in Miami when the call to prayer is delivered in a Guayabera. After the muezzin sang, Imam Nasir Ahmad approached the lectern at Masjid Al-Ansar on Northwest 54th Street to greet a hall full of Christians and Jews who responded to a call by MCCJ, the Miami Coalition of Christians and Jews, to join Friday prayers at a local mosque. “You outnumber my own congregation,” he said with a chuckle.

 

Courtesy Luis Gonzalez

John Broughton has contended with gun violence for as long as he can remember, as a witness, a loved one, and at times, a would-be shooter. Here, his grandfather Luis Gonzalez explains how gun violence has shaped John's life and those of three generations of their family in Miami.

Courtesy Nadav Alkoby

Marcelo Salup grew up in Spain in the last years of the Franco dictatorship, mindful of the state police and their long batons, and ETA, a Basque separatist group that waged an increasingly intense terror campaign from the 1960s until a ceasefire in 2010. 

“My formative years were spent in an atmosphere where you were very conscious ETA could just bomb anything,” Salup says. In fact, the group bombed the residential building where he lived as a kid, and later, the university where he went to school.

David Santiago / El Nuevo Herald


  When a gunman opened fire inside an airport terminal in Fort Lauderdale Friday, it was only a matter of time before tragedy gave way to a shockingly familiar political debate: are guns part of the problem, or aren’t they?

CM Guerrero / The Miami Herald

House Republicans abruptly reversed course Tuesday and abandoned a plan that would have gutted an independent office that investigates wrongdoing by representatives in Congress.

South Florida school districts continue to make gains in graduation rates, according to state data released Friday. Gains in 2015-2016 represent an all time high for Miami-Dade County Public Schools, even as South Florida graduation rates remain slightly below the state average of 80.7 percent, with the exception of Palm Beach County.

Miami Herald Archive

Representatives for two charter schools that illegally loaned public money to schools outside Miami-Dade County gave their word to the MDCPS School Board Tuesday that they plan to get it back. 

Still image from broadcast / MSNBC

For the past year, Miami-Dade County Public Schools has touted the success of an alternative-to-suspension program designed to provide counseling and academic support to students who act out, instead of suspending them from school altogether.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Immigration—or immigration enforcement—has been a signature issue for President-elect Donald Trump. One policy he has vowed to repeal is DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which gives about 750,000 young immigrants the ability to work and go to college here in the U.S. 

Katie Lepri / WLRN

The crowd filled two city blocks near a memorial dedicated to soldiers who died in the Bay of Pigs Invasion in 1961.

They danced to a Celia Cruz cover of “I will survive” and chanted "libertad, libertad, libertad." 

For many in Miami's Cuban-American exile community, the pain of Fidel Castro's rule, and the joy of his death, are deeply personal. Less than a week after the reviled and revered Cuban revolutionary passed, Little Havana continued to celebrate life after Fidel with a rally on Calle Ocho. 

Katie Lepri / WLRN

 

The centerpiece of the Shrine of Our Lady of Charity - the Ermita, built with donations from thousands of Cuban exiles in honor of the island's Patroness, the Virgen de la Caridad del Cobre or "Cachita"- is a floor-to-ceiling mural depicting centuries of Cuban history.  There are thinkers and freedom fighters, like Félix Varela and José Martí, and Christopher Columbus gazing out over an indigenous community. 

Creative Commons

New data from the Department of Education shows that students at hundreds of for-profit certificate and degree programs around the country end up earning the equivalent of less than the federal minimum wage after they graduate, even at programs that carry the possibility of tens of thousands of dollars in student debt.

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