Rowan Moore Gerety

Reporter

Before coming to WLRN, Rowan worked as a reporter for Northwest Public Radio in Washington State, where he produced a documentary for Latino USA on the tense relationship between the Yakama Nation and the Mexican American community that has become a majority on tribal lands.

He has written for The AtlanticSlate, and Foreign Policy, among others, and produced radio for NPR, The World, and Marketplace.

Rowan studied anthropology at Columbia University, was a 2011-2012 Fulbright Scholar in Mozambique. Read more of his work at rowanmg.com.

Ways to Connect

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

A group of middle schoolers from Brownsville got a behind-the-scenes look at the Third District Court of Appeal in Miami on Tuesday, along with the chance to run the place long enough to hold mock arguments in a case about school security.

John Kral / Miami Herald


Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

There are lots of ways to measure the recent spike in opioid overdoses in Miami-Dade County. You can look at the number of deaths from fentanyl—a potent drug often mixed with heroin sold in the street—which spiked from 13 in 2014 to nearly 300 just two years later, or at the even more powerful derivative carfentanyl, developed as an anesthetic for elephants, and which, by rights, should only be available at the zoo.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

As their constituents protested in support of the Affordable Care Act in Miami Wednesday, two South Florida republicans provided crucial votes for a bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, which narrowly passed the house 217-213.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

On a Wednesday afternoon at Lorah Park Elementary School in Brownsville, a half dozen 4-year-olds are clustered on the carpet trying to keep up with a song on Spanish greetings.

“Y como están?,” their teacher asks once the music stops, slowing things down so they have time to enunciate.

“MUY. BIEN. GRA-CI-AS,” they reply in a chorus. “¿Y USTED?”

In another room, second graders try their hand at a series of dizzying Spanish tongue twisters—“Como poco coco como, poco coco compro.” (Since I don’t eat much coconut, I don’t buy much either.”)

Courtesy Freddie Young

The iconic images of school integration show determined black students making their way through jeering white crowds, just to take their seats in class. And at the head of those classes, teachers who were part of a workforce every bit as segregated as the student body.

WJXT

The state Senate is considering a $200 million program passed by the House that would speed up the process for closing underperforming public schools and funding charter schools in their place.

Courtesy of Adam Cohen

During the 2012-2013 school year, some high school students in Broward County started looking into public access to public meetings as part of a class project — “Democracy in Action” — that almost became state law. 

Broward County Public Schools

Around 2:30 p.m. last Tuesday, Broward County School Board Chair Abby Freedman faced an auditorium full of empty chairs, reading through a list of 17 scheduled speakers — “ Terry Preuss, Liliana Ruido, Julie Ganas, Joan King,” she said.

No one was there: On the school board’s written agenda for the meeting, public comment wasn’t supposed to begin for more than two hours, at 5 p.m.

Miami Herald

Nearly two years into Miami-Dade Schools’ signature alternative-to-suspension program, it’s hard to measure the impact of the heavily touted Student Success Centers.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

 

Representatives from law enforcement agencies across Miami-Dade County pledged Monday night to test out a model for reducing gun violence by focusing on providing services to a small number of perpetrators. 

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Police and government officials from Guatemala have been in Miami all week visiting schools and shadowing Miami-Dade schools police as part of a training program organized by the U.S. State department.

On Friday, they stood by and observed as MDCPS schools police cued mock explosions, students in gory makeup and a canine unit as part of hostage scenario training drill unfolding at Treasure Island Elementary School in North Bay Village.

Rowan Moore Gerety

When Yomaira Hidalgo set out for an associate’s degree taking classes at ITT Tech three nights a week, it didn’t take long to unravel the precarious routine she shared with her husband, her mother and three young children. In a word, she says, it  was “miserable.”

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