Peter Haden

Palm Beach Reporter

Peter Haden is WLRN’s Palm Beach Reporter. His stories cover the diverse issues and voices of a region that includes both the richest and poorest cities in Florida, the president’s “Winter White House,” the state’s leading agricultural territory, a bustling cruise and container port, vibrant immigrant communities, world-famous beaches and the Everglades.

Before joining WLRN, Haden reported for the investigative reporting showcase Reveal, WJCT in Jacksonville, Cronkite News in Phoenix and as a worldwide freelancer. He’s crouched at the intersection of desert Figure 8 races, skimmed alligator-infested waters with Florida bangstick hunters, ridden atop freight trains with migrants crossing Mexico and atop horses with Chilean cowboys crossing the Andes — to bring his audience into the story.

Haden’s radio and multimedia work has won awards from Edward R. Murrow, PRNDI, IRE and the Mark of Excellence award from the Society of Professional Journalists. His stories have been featured on programs including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Reveal and The Takeaway.

Haden holds degrees in geography, international studies and multimedia journalism. He grew up in the Midwest shearing sheep.

Ways to Connect

Peter Haden / WLRN

Needy families in Palm Beach County are getting a holiday boost from a local legend.

Don King gave away 1,000 frozen turkeys at the former Jai Alai fronton he owns in Mangonia Park.

“Community unity is our cry,” said King. “We got to work together, and working together works.”

Peter Haden / WLRN

A South Florida university is on a path to help improve the country’s transportation systems, thanks to a boost from the federal government.

Florida Atlantic University will get $8.5 million  over the next five years from the U.S. Department of Transportation to fund research on how to move freight more efficiently and make roads safer.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Addiction treatment is big business in Palm Beach County.

According to research conducted by the Palm Beach Post, it brings in more than $1 billion a year, making addiction treatment the county’s fourth largest industry – only behind tourism, construction and agriculture.

Trials of former Nazis accused of aiding in the Holocaust continue to wind their way through the German legal system even now.

Oskar Groening was a guard at Auschwitz concentration camp from 1942-1944.  A German court last year found the 95-year-old Groening guilty of 300,000 counts of accessory to murder. His conviction was upheld by an appeals court last month.

“It’s the idea that living to an old age does not absolve you of guilt,” said Andrew Nagorski, author of the book The Nazi Hunters.

Peter Haden / WLRN

What can be done to stem the epidemic of opioid overdoses in South Florida?

Peter Haden / WLRN

Palm Beach County Commissioners gave the green light Wednesday to a controversial school proposal.

Dozens of people filled the commissioners chambers in West Palm Beach to voice support or opposition to construction of the Divine Savior Academy in West Delray Beach. The room was a two-tone mosaic -- opponents in red shirts, supporters in blue.

Peter Haden / WLRN

The epidemic of opioid overdoses continues to grip Delray Beach. The city saw 75 heroin overdoses last month, with 4 of them fatal.

That’s a slight decrease from October, which brought an all-time high of 88 heroin overdoses resulting in 11 fatalities.

Delray Beach emergency personnel attribute the spike in overdoses to synthetic opioids like fentanyl being added to heroin sold on the street.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, fentanyl is more than 50 times more potent than heroin.

Miami Herald

After more than three decades on the force, Fort Lauderdale police chief Frank Adderley is trading in his blue uniform for a green one.

He’s stepping down as the city’s top cop and stepping in-to a new role at the Broward Sheriff’s Office. He’ll join BSO as a colonel in charge of community affairs.

The man leading the fight against unscrupulous sober homes has a message for state legislators.

“When the appropriations process comes up, please keep us in mind,” said Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg at a meeting with the Palm Beach County Legislative Delegation in Boca Raton Tuesday.

Palm Beach County Jail

A sober home operator is under arrest in Palm Beach County following a corruption investigation.

Ehab Iskander, 33, of West Palm Beach, faces six counts of patient brokering. He runs Integrity House, a sober home in Lake Worth. Sober homes — also known as halfway houses — are group living facilities for recovering addicts.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Lawyers representing 142 retired NFL players filed a federal lawsuit against the NFL Monday in Fort Lauderdale.

They want the league to recognize CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, as an occupational hazard that should be covered by workers compensation.

Tony Gaiter, 42, is the lead plaintiff in the suit.

He played for the University of Miami, before going on to play for the New England patriots and the San Diego Chargers.

Associated Press

President-elect Donald Trump will be sticking to his Thanksgiving tradition of visiting his estate in Palm Beach.

Republican National Committee spokesperson Sean Spicer told reporters about Trump’s holiday plans Monday morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration announced major flight restrictions will be in place around Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate from Tuesday afternoon through Friday.

The restrictions cover a circle about seven miles wide, but flights in and out of Palm Beach International Airport will not be affected.

Peter Haden

The nation’s top doctor is calling for a change in the way America addresses substance abuse.

U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy aims to remove the public stigma of addiction by defining it as a neurological brain disorder that needs to be addressed like any other chronic illness.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Over the past week, a swarm of local and international artists have been working in parks and vacant lots in West Palm Beach, transforming the spaces into a giant outdoor museum. 

iStock

The federal government is giving cities some new guidance on how far they can go in regulating sober homes.

The Departments of Justice and Housing and Urban Development issued the joint statement Thursday.

It gives local governments some legal wiggle room to oversee group housing for recovering addicts on a case-by-case basis.

For example, many cities bar more than three unrelated people from living in a single-family home. But sober homes are often given an exemption to that rule because the occupants are considered to be disabled and are protected by federal law.

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