Peter Haden

Broward/Palm Beach Reporter

Peter Haden is WLRN’s Broward & Palm Beach Reporter. His stories cover the diverse issues and voices of a region that includes both the richest and poorest cities in Florida, the president’s “Winter White House,” Native American reservations, the state’s leading agricultural territory, a bustling cruise and container port, vibrant immigrant communities, world-famous beaches and the Everglades.

Before joining WLRN, Haden reported for the investigative reporting showcase Reveal, WJCT in Jacksonville, Cronkite News in Phoenix and as a worldwide freelancer. He’s crouched at the intersection of desert Figure 8 races, skimmed alligator-infested waters with Florida bangstick hunters, ridden atop freight trains with migrants crossing Mexico and atop horses with Chilean cowboys crossing the Andes — to bring his audience into the story.

Haden’s radio and multimedia work has won awards from Edward R. Murrow, PRNDI, IRE and the Mark of Excellence award from the Society of Professional Journalists. His stories have been featured on programs including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Reveal and The Takeaway.

Haden holds degrees in geography, international studies and multimedia journalism. He grew up in the Midwest shearing sheep. Now in South Florida, he wants to learn to surf and spearfish.

Ways to Connect

Peter Haden / WLRN News

The city of Clewiston sits on the south shore of Lake Okeechobee. It’s one of the best places in the country to snag a largemouth bass.

But in the days after Irma, people are flooding Clewiston to fish for something else: gas.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Florida Power & Light officials say it could be more than 10 days before power is restored to all customers who are in the dark due to Hurricane Irma.

FP&L spokesperson Rob Gould said restoration to nearly all customers in the eastern half of the state should be completed by Sunday night.

The company expects power to be restored to western Florida — more heavily damaged by the storm — by Sept. 22.

Two people overdosed on opioids while in shelters in Palm Beach County during Hurricane Irma, officials said.

Ryan Kelly/flickr

As Hurricane Irma continued to lash South Florida Sunday, Palm Beach County first responders were maintaining order despite some challenges.

Palm Beach County officials say 43 people have been charged with violating a county-wide curfew in effect due to Hurricane Irma. And at emergency shelters, opioids have been a problem.

“There have been two overdoses,” said Aronberg. “[The victims] have been saved and treated medically.”

Aronberg said the two victims were revived with an overdose reversal drug.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Florida Sen. Bill Nelson says the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is making preparations in the state for Hurricane Irma.

“FEMA is pre-positioning people and supplies to be able to come in right after the hurricane,” Nelson said Wednesday at a press conference at the Palm Beach County Emergency Operations Center.

But due to the recovery from Hurricane Harvey in Texas, the agency is set to run out of funds soon without an emergency funding authorization.

“If they don’t get it by Friday, they’re out of money,” Nelson said.

Peter Haden / WLRN

South Florida officials and advocates rallied at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton Thursday night to highlight International Overdose Awareness Day.

Officials from Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach Counties spoke with the crowd about potential solutions to the crisis.

A lack of public treatment beds is a problem throughout the region.

Palm Beach County Vice Mayor Melissa McKinley says the the county is developing plans to open a receiving facility for drug users in an old county stockade building near the fairgrounds. The building is currently vacant.

Peter Haden / WLRN

South Florida Congressman Ted Deutch held a town hall meeting in Boca Raton Thursday.

Constituents from his 22nd District — which stretches from Boca Raton south to Fort Lauderdale and west to Coral Springs — came with lots of different  things on their minds.

“Health care is the No. 1 issue in the country right now,” said Cameron Stemple, 28.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Drug overdoses now kill more Americans than car accidents or gun violence.

Thursday is International Overdose Awareness Day and, to mark the occasion, advocates and officials from Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade Counties will gather on the Florida Atlantic University campus in Boca Raton to call for greater federal action to end the United States’s epidemic of addiction and overdose deaths.

Rallies will be held in cities around the country.

Maureen Kielian is a parent advocate from Fort Lauderdale who helped organize the event.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Drug overdose deaths are going up in Broward County.

Deaths from opioid overdoses topped 520 in 2016, according to the county Medical Examiner's Office. That’s about 10 a week.

Cocaine overdose deaths were up more than 60 percent in Broward in 2016 — to 230 people.

It’s part of an overall trend that’s wreaking havoc around the country: poly-substance abuse.

“There are no normal drugs anymore,” said Broward County Medical Examiner Dr. Craig Mallak. “Everything’s a combination.”

Peter Haden / WLRN

Widespread incidents of fraud have given the South Florida addiction treatment industry a black eye. Law enforcement has been cracking down — with strong support from the treatment industry’s legitimate providers.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Law enforcement has been cracking down on corruption in South Florida’s drug treatment industry. State and federal officials have arrested more than 30 people for running scams in rehab centers or sober homes in the past year.

But the facilities are often filled with recovering drug users from out-of-state. And when the homes shut down, the residents frequently wind up on the street.

CHARLES TRAINOR JR / Miami Herald

The American Cancer Society has spent a lot of time in Washington opposing President Trump’s efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. But that hasn’t changed the organization’s plans to host its annual winter gala at Mar-a-Lago -- the president’s Palm Beach resort.

Peter Haden / WLRN

State legislators came to Palm Beach County Tuesday to discuss the opioid crisis.

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