Patricia Sagastume

Patricia Sagastume’s journalism career spans over two decades in broadcast television, radio and print. Whether she is producing a feature about the lobstering industry or investigating a story behind the scenes of a two-year copper mining strike, her stories unravel a drama that makes you care. Her credits range from being a producer for a PBS health series to reporting for television magazine programs across the country. Patricia's talent as a series producer was evident in the award-winning children's program she created. Later she developed a science and technology series for a PBS broadcast station in Tampa. In the Southwest she contributed border-themed stories to a syndicated PBS regional radio program. Her on-camera work landed her stints as a co-anchor and host of news and entertainment shows across the country. Currently, she specializes in environmental stories for radio, print and other projects. In 2012, she was a journalism fellow for the Scripps Howard Institute on the Environment and Science. Ms. Sagastume is scuba certified, which comes in handy to explore coral reefs.  

http://patriciasagastume.blogspot.com/

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Art Basel
11:59 am
Fri December 6, 2013

By Sculpting Through His Grief, Local Artist Finds Spotlight

Credit Charles Soto / Instagram

Charles Soto started tattooing four years ago, after his mother died following a long illness.

“[It] was a moment in my life of desperation. I hit rock bottom," he says. "I was dead broke."

Three years later, Soto reconnected with his estranged older brother, just months before the latter died of HIV complications. His grief influenced his art with dark overtones, but also put him in the sightline of a company now displaying his work during Art Basel.

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Elevation Zero
3:24 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Outdated Miami Canals Too Weak For Sea-Level Rise

Credit Balthazira / Flickr Creative Commons

  It’s been more than half a century since flood-control structures such as dams and canals were constructed throughout Florida. Now, with the impact of sea-level rise on the horizon, many of these structures are becoming fragile barriers to keep floodwaters and tidal surge safely away.

Dr. Jayantha Obeysekera is in charge of assessing short- and long-term responses regarding sea-level rise for the South Florida Water Management District. He examines the canal system in Miami's Little River neighborhood, which separates the river from the ocean.

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Food
2:57 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Discovering Guava Cake Specialities In The Everglades

Joanie Griffin, owner of the historic Tamiami Trail restaurant, Joanie's Blue Crab, is all smiles with her daughter Terri Rementeria. The pair took first place in a recent guava coconut cake contest in Everglades City.

Just like Key Lime pie is an iconic dessert from the Florida Keys, some locals claim the guava cake, or some form of it, is a mainstay Everglades favorite.

The name "guava" is derived from the Greek word meaning "edible fruit."

But despite its gastronomical attributes, many people would be surprised to learn that the common guava is officially listed as an invasive species.

Reporter Patricia Sagastume traveled to edge of the Everglades to see how one town is not likely to condemn this tasty fruit.

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Fishing
12:56 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Why Stone Crabbers Are Praying For A Better Season

Stone Crabbers line up on the Barron River behind the Everglades City Rod and Gun Club to receive a blessing before the start of stone crab season.
Credit Marya Repko

All summer, stone crab crews have been mending their traps and preparing their boats -- waiting for the start of the stone crab season.

With the opening of the season starting Oct. 15, the economic future of the industry will hinge on how bountiful the catch is for Monroe, Lee and Collier counties.

It’s these three areas that provide the bulk of the two to three million pounds of stone crab landings in Florida each year.

But last year, the going was rough for a lot of the crabbers.

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Politics
6:05 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

North Miami Beach Supports Voting Rights for Felons

Councilwoman Barbara Kramer and Desmond Meade worked to pass resolution to support voter restoration for felons.
Credit Patricia Sagastume

Florida has some of the strictest laws concerning a felon’s right to vote. They must apply for executive clemency after a five- or seven-year waiting period. And that’s only if they are deemed eligible.

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Lobster Woman
6:00 am
Mon September 2, 2013

How One Woman Lives At Sea: Inside The Life Of A Florida Keys Lobster Catcher

Patricia Sagastume

It’s past sunset as 28-year old Captain Kelly Nichols Bourne and her crew return from a day of hauling lobsters traps. When she joined her father’s business a decade ago, she was the youngest female commercial captain in the Keys. She still is. Now she and her father drop about 7,600 lobster and 8,000 crab traps from the Gulf to the Atlantic.

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People
10:07 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Veterans Build New Army Of Divers In Shark-Infested Waters

Sgt. Sergeant Stephen Jackel dives for the first time with two prosthetic legs off the coast of West Palm Beach.
Credit Operation: Blue Pride

Once a warrior always a warrior.

For Sergeant Stephen Wayne Jackel Jr., who walks on two metal prosthetics below the knees - he’s found a new army to join after retiring from the United States Army at 34 years old. 

“We aren’t concerned about the army we’re going to build, it’s how long its going to take to build that army,” said Jackel Jr. 

That army being raised is not land-based brigade but a group of undersea soldiers, with severely injured veterans leading the way.

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Environment
10:13 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Why Invasive Lionfish Are So Hard To Eradicate From South Florida Waters

The latest tool in the battle against Florida's lionfish invasion is the Antipodes, a five-person manned submersible operated by OceanGate, Inc.
Credit OceanGate, Inc.

A team of scientists from  around the country recently spent two days off the coast of South Florida to investigate the explosion of lionfish.

What they found was shocking. Why?

Because there’s a war going on and the indomitable lionfish are winning.

These voracious predators are known to invade the shallows of coral reef.  They’re dangerous because they ruin the habitat and eat juvenile spiny lobsters, snappers, groupers, tarpon and bonefish - all valuable marine species humans rely on.

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Civil Rights
1:14 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Gay Hialeah Cop Captures Struggle For Equality Through Short Film

Wil Jackson is a sergeant with the Hialeah Police Department and executive producer of The Denied.
Credit Wil Jackson

Floridians in same-sex marriages  and elsewhere hope to be indebted to Edith Windsor. She is the 84-year-old widow whose U.S. Supreme Court victory garnered equal federal rights for gay marriages this week.

Windsor nursed her ailing wife, Thea Spyer, until Spyer died of multiple sclerosis. Until recently gays and lesbians  Florida often have not had the opportunity to provide loved ones that kind of care if family or hospital staff objected.

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Environment
7:38 am
Thu June 20, 2013

How Igor The Amazonian Pacu Fish Found A Place Called Home

Igor the Pacu fish has two sets of pectoral fins and a deformed face but he is still a favorite for many visitors at the Loxahatchee River Center in Jupiter.
Credit Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

In the piranha- infested waters of the Amazon, a baby Black Pacu, the vegetarian cousin of the flesh-eating fish survives capture.  If it had nine lives, its next one was in a tropical aquarium in a Boca Raton seafood restaurant.

Weighing nearly one pound, the non-native Pacu was growing too big, too fast. Once again, the fish needed another home. The restaurant, The Ports of Call, was dismantling their aquariums so the Pacu was returned to its original owner.

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Psychology
10:24 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Therapists, Patients Find Stress Relief On Skateboards

Robert Aguilar and Isaac Farin rest after an afternoon of therapy on wheels.
Credit Patricia Sagastume

Move over, Freud. Your couch is being replaced by a piece of wood on wheels.

On the shady slopes of pavement in Greynolds Park in North Miami Beach, a therapy counseling session is in progress.

Once a week, amid the sprawling canopies of hardwood hammocks and mangrove forests, patients sort through emotions — while pushing on a longboard skateboard.

Donning kneepads and helmet gear, Alex Batista, 47, smiles as he rides silently alongside his therapist.

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Arts
7:08 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Where To Hear Live Music: More Than 40 Bands Play Grassroots Festival At Key Biscayne

Jeb Puryear, guitarist for Donna the Buffalo. Virginia Key Grassroots Festival, Miami 2012.
Credit Courtesy Mathew Coburn Photography

This weekend, music lovers have a special treat with the second annual Virginia Key Grassroots Festival of Music and Dance at Key Biscayne. This four-day event of live music,  includes camping, a sustainability fair, along with great food, meditation and yoga.

Reporter Patricia Sagastume tells us why the event is coming back despite last year’s rough start:

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Radio
1:00 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

How Organics And Imports Are Impacting Florida's Once-Dominant Tomato Market

On many Florida farms, tomatoes are picked green and then ripened.
Patricia Sagastume

Clarification: In this story,  it could  be perceived that representatives from Lipman Produce do not like the idea of good-tasting tomatoes. That is not the case.  Lipman says its goal is to create the best-tasting tomatoes possible which are able to withstand transportation and maintain a shelf life. Since 2012, Lipman has been experimenting with protected agriculture  --  growing tomatoes in retractable roof greenhouses on five acres of land in Naples, FL.

Florida growers  once dominated the tomato market, but  global competition has changed that. 

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Baby Quails
6:00 am
Tue January 29, 2013

How Baby Quails Are Helping Baby Humans Before Returning To The Wild

Robert Lickliter, is the director of graduate studies in the Psychology Department at FIU’s College of Arts & Sciences. He leads a research team that studies quail embryos for clues about pre-term baby development.
Credit Patricia Sagastume

One day more than seven years ago, Debbie Brunson  woke up to an unfamiliar sound. She and her husband were camping on their land in the Redlands farming area. The sound she heard was that of an adult male Bob White quail.

It shocked her because she hadn't heard that bird call for over a decade.

"In Florida, there use to be quail everywhere.  But because of farming and pesticides and buildings,  they’ve disappeared," Brunson said.

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AIDS In Haiti
7:00 am
Tue January 15, 2013

A Poetic Journey After The Quake: HIV/AIDs In Haiti

Alex, 17, lives in the municipality of Carrefour.
Photos by Andre Lambertson, Haiti, 2010.

 

The devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti demolished the country's health care system along with everything else.

But from the ruins came Voices of Haiti -- an odyssey in verse that grew out of a commission from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to document HIV/AIDS after the quake. The multimedia project, which came to the University of Miami this year, blends Haitian voices to conjure up images of strength, hope and faith.

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