Ofeibea Quist-Arcton

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is a journalist and broadcaster from Ghana who reports for NPR News on issues and developments related to West Africa. She spent her early years in Ghana, Italy, Britain and Kenya.

Quist-Arcton has lived and worked in the U.K., France, Ivory Coast, U.S., South Africa and most recently Senegal, traveling all over Africa as a journalist, broadcaster, commentator and host.

After completing high school in Britain, she took a degree in French studies with international relations and Spanish at the London School of Economics (LSE) and went on to study radio journalism at the Polytechnic of Central London, with two internships at the BBC.

Quist-Arcton joined the BBC in 1985, working at a number of regional radio stations all over Britain, moving two years later to the renowned BBC World Service at Bush House in London, as a producer and host in the African Service. She traveled and reported throughout Africa.

She spent the year leading up to 1990 in Paris, on a BBC journalist exchange with Radio France International (RFI), working in "Monito" — a service supplying reports and interviews about Africa to African radio stations, and with RFI's English (for Africa) Service as a host, reporter and editor.

Later in 1990, Quist-Arcton won one of the BBC's coveted foreign correspondents posts, moving to Abidjan, Ivory Coast, to head the corporation's West Africa bureau. From there, she covered 24 countries, straddling the Sahara to the heart of the continent — crisscrossing the continent from Mauritania, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Mali, to Zaire and Congo-Brazzaville, via Chad, Equatorial Guinea and Cameroon. She contributed to all BBC radio and television outlets, covering the flowering of democracy in the region, as well as the outbreak of civil wars, revolutions and coups, while always keeping an eye on the "other" stories about Africa that receive minimal media attention — including the continent's rich cultural heritage. Quist-Arcton also contributed to NPR programs during her reporting assignment in West and Central Africa.

After four years as BBC West Africa correspondent, she returned to Bush House in 1994, as a host and senior producer on the BBC World Service flagship programs, Newshour & Newsday (now The World Today), and as a contributing Africa specialist for other radio and TV output.

Quist-Arcton laced up her traveling shoes again in 1995 and relocated to Boston as a roving reporter for The World, a co-production between the BBC, Public Radio International (PRI) and WGBH. She lived in Cambridge and enjoyed getting to know Massachusetts and the rest of New England, learning a new language during winter, most of it related to snow!

For The World, she traveled around the United States, providing the program with an African journalist's perspective on North American life. She also spent six months as a roving Africa reporter, covering — among other events — the fall of President Mobutu Sese Seko in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo) in 1997.

In 1998, after another stint back at BBC World Service, Quist-Arcton was appointed co-host of the South African Broadcasting Corporation's flagship radio drive-time show, PM Live, based in Johannesburg.

In 2000, she left the BBC to join allAfrica.com (allAfricaGlobal Media) as Africa correspondent, covering the continent's top stories, in all domains, and developing new radio shows for webcast and syndication to radio stations around the continent.

After six years in South Africa, Quist-Arcton joined NPR in November 2004 at the newly-created post of West Africa Correspondent, moving back to her home region, with a new base in Senegal.

Her passions are African art and culture, music, literature, open-air markets, antiques - and learning. She loves to travel and enjoys cycling and photography.

Pages

Africa
6:33 pm
Sun April 26, 2015

South Africa's Xenophobic Attacks 'Vile,' Says Zulu King Accused Of Inciting Them

Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, center, arrives at a Zulu gathering at a stadium in Durban, South Africa. Six people have died in anti-immigrant violence in the city in recent weeks, and another death has been reported in Johannesburg; Zwelithini is accused of inciting the attacks with incendiary comments, but says his remarks were taken out of context.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 12:36 am

Goodwill Zwelithini is the influential king of South Africa's Zulu nation. Comments that he made last month — when he reportedly said head lice should be squashed and foreigners should pack their belongings and leave the country — have been blamed for igniting attacks on foreigners, resulting in at least seven deaths. But Zwelithini denies inciting the violence.

Read more
Africa
5:08 pm
Sun April 5, 2015

After Nigeria's Election, A Call For Unity

Originally published on Sun April 5, 2015 9:12 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Africa
7:59 am
Sat April 4, 2015

President-Elect Buhari Tells Nigerians Not To Expect 'Miracles'

Originally published on Sat April 4, 2015 10:30 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Africa
6:47 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Voting In Nigeria Affected By Isolated Violence And Irregularities

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 12:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
Africa
5:05 am
Fri March 20, 2015

Nigerian Army Advances Against Boko Haram As Election Looms

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Parallels
4:35 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Boko Haram Takes A Page From ISIS Propaganda Playbook

The most recent propaganda videos from Boko Haram have higher production values than in the past and other similarities to ISIS-produced videos.
Boko Haram Sendvid

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 6:55 pm

In its latest video, Islamist extremists from the Nigerian group Boko Haram display the bodies of two men accused of spying. They have been beheaded.

Gone are Boko Haram's occasional grainy videos, replaced by slick productions apparently inspired by the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

It's a development that may indicate a shift in allegiance by Boko Haram away from al-Qaida.

Read more
Africa
5:06 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Boko Haram Ramps Up Attacks Despite Effort To Repel Them

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 10:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
12:29 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

While New England Gets Snow, West Africa Gets Sand

The Harmattan haze can become so dense in Dakar, Senegal, it dims the sun and grounds flights.
Joe Penney Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 2:11 pm

Would you kindly bear with me a little while I have a good old moan, please? I'm feeling rather wretched. No, not because I've finally kicked a lingering lurgy that turned out to be bronchitis and stole my voice. But because one of the reasons I blame for the illness is back: the Harmattan.

Read more
Goats and Soda
2:23 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Guinea's Grand Imam Pulls No Punches In His Ebola Message

Guinea's Grand Imam, El Hadj Mamadou Saliou Camara, tells his fellow clerics: "If there is any doubt at all, then no one must touch the body."
Kevin Leahy NPR

"Ebola — you have to do more," roars the barrel-bellied cleric El Hadj Mamadou Saliou Camara, with his white beard and mustache, in a snow-white boubou, the traditional flowing gown of West Africa.

That's the message he delivered over the weekend to hundreds of his fellow clerics, who gathered in Kindia, the third largest city in Guinea and a major crossroads. Many of the residents still blame Westerners for bringing the virus to their country.

Read more
Goats and Soda
5:34 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Africa's Soccer Tourney Takes Guinea's Mind Off Ebola

Guinea's defender Fode Camara (left) heads the ball over Ivory Coast's forward Wilfried Bony in the Africa Cup of Nations tournament.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 9:22 am

Red, gold and green – Guinea's national colors — filled the streets of the capital, Conakry, early this morning. Guineans of all ages proudly wore the colors on their T-shirts, headbands, dresses and shorts. Children, with their cheeks and foreheads painted, ran around the street cheering, blowing whistles and waving their nation's flags.

But by 3 p.m. the streets were dead.

Read more
Africa
4:09 pm
Mon January 19, 2015

School's Back On In Guinea: Reading, Writing, Temperature-Taking

Six-year old Hadja Sow (left) and a classmate on their first day back at school after a prolonged break because of Ebola.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 8:38 am

At the crack of dawn, the Sow family — parents and four children, two girls and two boys — are up at their home in Conakry, Guinea's capital.

Sitting on a wooden stool, Aissatou Sow bends over to light a gas stove on the floor and heat up a breakfast of fried fish, vegetables and french fries, plus hot milk and fruit.

El Hadj Alhassane is 11; his sister Hadja is 6. They're off to school after being out of class for six months.

Big bro helps little sis zip up her backpack, and they head out the door into their dad's car.

Read more
Africa
5:01 am
Mon January 19, 2015

Countdown To Zero: Guinea's Campaign To Conquer Ebola In 60 Days

Cheerleaders with pompoms helped kick off a government campaign to eliminate Ebola from Guinea in 60 days.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:34 pm

Hundreds of spectators and government officials watched as music and fanfare filled the People's Palace in Conakry, Guinea. Cheerleaders danced vigorously, waving pompoms and twirling on stage. The festive event on Saturday kicked off the government's newest campaign: zero Ebola cases in 60 days.

"Guineans talk too much. People resist even the idea that Ebola exists," said the prime minister, Mohamed Said Fofana, when he took the stage. "Why do we refuse to accept what others have accepted? We really must get a grip on the situation."

Read more
Africa
7:50 am
Sat January 10, 2015

Nigerian Forces Fight To Free Town From Terrorists

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Goats and Soda
12:37 pm
Wed December 31, 2014

A Son Is Lost Without His Mother. So Is A Country

Dr. Ameyo Adadevoh and her only child, Bankole Cardoso. Even after she was diagnosed with Ebola, her son says, "Her morale was not low. She is such a fighter."
Courtesy of Bankole Cardoso

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 9:19 am

She is one of the African health workers who caught Ebola and died. Dr. Ameyo Adadevoh was the head of First Consultants Medical Centre in Lagos, Nigeria. In July, Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer flew sick to the city from Monrovia, ended up at her clinic and turned out to have Ebola. He wanted to leave. Dr. Adadevoh and her team refused to let him go — if she had, he could have triggered a wide-scale epidemic in Lagos, a city of 20 million people.

Read more
Goats and Soda
12:09 pm
Tue December 30, 2014

Ebola Survivor: Faith And Oral Rehydration Salts Got Her Through

Dr. Ada Igonoh is an Ebola survivor.
Akintunde Akinleye Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue December 30, 2014 6:53 pm

Dr. Ada Igonoh says her faith and ORS (oral rehydration salts) helped her pull through after she tested positive for Ebola. The 28-year-old Nigerian doctor was on the medical team that cared for the country's first Ebola patient, Patrick Sawyer, a Liberian-American who flew into Lagos sick and died at the clinic where she worked. Nigeria was hailed for halting what many feared could have been a catastrophic outbreak. Dr. Igonoh shares her story of fear, faith and recovery.

Tell me a little about yourself.

Read more

Pages