NPR Staff

Donald Trump, a neophyte in foreign policy and national security issues, will take office in January facing a world of challenges. The president-elect's campaign trail pronouncements on international affairs were sometimes contradictory, often vague and seldom substantive, leaving many in the U.S. and abroad to speculate about what exactly his foreign and defense policies might look like.

NPR journalists in Washington and around the world weigh in on some of the thorniest and most pressing international issues a Trump administration will confront.

Influential singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has died at the age of 82, according to a publicist for his U.S. record label.

Cohen died Monday, but news of his death came out late Thursday. His Facebook page had this announcement:

"It is with profound sorrow we report that legendary poet, songwriter and artist, Leonard Cohen has passed away.
We have lost one of music's most revered and prolific visionaries.

In late October, Donald Trump released an action plan for what he hopes to accomplish in his first 100 days in office. Below, NPR reporters and editors from the politics team and other coverage areas have annotated Trump's plan. We've added context on several of his proposals, including whether he can really repeal Obamacare and what a hiring freeze on the federal workforce would actually look like.

When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who's already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

Sarah Weeldreyer, 37, is a stay-at-home-mom with two kids, has been married for 11 years, and is going through a divorce.

Here at Goats and Soda, we're trying something new: We'd like to know what you want us to investigate. Our first call-out was about girls in the developing world. And last week, we asked you to submit questions on global diseases.

TIM KAINE:

Thank you so much. Please, please have a seat. My wife Anne and I are so proud of Hillary Clinton. I'm proud of Hillary Clinton because she has been and is a great history maker in everything she has done - as a civil rights lawyer, and First Lady of Arkansas, and First Lady of this country, and senator, and Secretary of State. She has made history. In a nation that is good at so many things but that has made it uniquely difficult for a woman to be elected to federal office.

Of all the things that have come up during this election cycle — from immigration to the size of one candidate's hands — one issue that didn't get much air time was climate change.

When a voter heads to the polls, any number of factors may influence how she casts her vote: party affiliation, her impression of the candidates — or even the design of the ballot itself.

The visual layout of a ballot can have a surprising effect on a voter's decision. And anyone who recalls the 2000 presidential election, which drew national attention to some confusing elements of the Florida ballot, can tell you that designers don't always get it right.

So, who are the people designing the ballots? That depends on where you're asking.

Donald Trump was surrounded by security agents and hustled off a Reno, Nev., stage Saturday night while people in the crowd before him called out, "He's got a gun."

The Republican nominee disappeared behind the backdrop of the Nevada rally while law enforcement swarmed the area directly before the podium.

A man was led from the rally by a phalanx of armed agents.

The U.S. Secret Service said in a statement there was no weapon involved in the incident after a search of the person, as part of an ongoing investigation, according to the Associated Press.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Jenn Stanley tries not to bring up politics when she returns home to visit her father. She really, really tries.

"But you always watch the 5 o'clock news, and the minute any politician steps on — it doesn't matter who it is — I just cringe."

Whether it's an IUD, a shot, an implant, or a daily pill, birth control is a regular part of many adult women's lives. It has left a lot of women asking: Why not men?

This year's presidential campaign seems to be one of a kind, but it is really part of a bigger picture that stretches beyond the U.S.

Donald Trump's message to anyone who doubts he can win: Look at what happened in the United Kingdom last summer. The vote to leave the EU in June was fueled by some of the same issues that Trump is tapping.

"Believe me. This is Brexit times five. You watch what's going to happen," he said last month.

The Internet can be a dangerous place. Hackers, bots and viruses are prowling the Web trying to turn your machines into zombies.

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