NPR News



Originally published on November 14, 2015 10:05 pm


Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET


As Paris assesses the full toll of Friday night's terrorist attacks that hit six locations in and around the city, here's what we know so far:

The Victims

The attacks that began around 9:20 p.m. local time killed 129 people, French officials say, and left at least 352 more wounded — with 99 of them in critical condition. The victims were attacked at several sites across the French capital:

Last night’s debates between the GOP candidates vying for the presidency drew a television audience that was only slightly smaller than the NFL’s opening Sunday night football game this past weekend. About one in every seven American households tuned in, and it may have been the largest audience for any event broadcast on CNN ever.


The U.S. Supreme Court is finishing its year with rulings on three major cases: affirmative action in college admissions, the pre-clearance requirements of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the status of gay marriage (Prop 8 and DOMA.)

Join host Linda Wertheimer tonight with guests Ron Elving, Senior Washington Editor; Nina Totenberg, Legal Affairs Correspondent; Tom Goldstein, publisher of SCOTUSblog and Michael Fauntroy, Associate Professor of Political Science at Howard University for an hour-long special that will look at these rulings and reflect on the past year.

In 1957, Joel Healy witnessed one of the largest nuclear tests ever conducted on U.S. soil.

Healy was in the U.S. Army, stationed in the Nevada desert north of Las Vegas at Camp Desert Rock. He was 17 years old and a private first class at the time.

Healy drove dump trucks, moved materials, and built structures, like houses, that would be destroyed by the explosions so the Army could study the effects of a nuclear blast. He also helped build the towers where many of the bombs were detonated.