Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

In 2016 she was recognized  by the National Association of Black Journalists with three first place awards for investigative reporting, long form and short form radio reporting on policing in Miami-Dade’s black communities. Green’s work has also been honored by the Florida AP Broadcaster Awards. Green previously worked at the Miami Herald covering local city governments and the Haitian community.

She studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald

Trayvon Martin's parents, Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, emerged as activists after their son’s death--saying that justice was not served.

Kali Duffy, YoungArts photography finalist

A group of young photographers from around the country huddled outside the Little Haiti Cultural Center this week listening to Carl Juste, a Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist for the Miami Herald.

Juste, whose father Viter Juste is credited for coining the name Little Haiti, was schooling the photographers about the neighborhood’s vibe.

“People live on their porches, people greet. People exchange ideas and conversation outside their homes,” he said.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Two Haitian women are haggling over the cost of carrots and green squash along a sidewalk in Miami's Little Haiti neighborhood.

They're standing at Bernadette Dubreide's  fruit and vegetable stand on Northeast Second Avenue.  Regulars call her Madam Dubreide.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The dead bodies haunt Wislande Philippe.

“There were so many who died,” said Phillipe, 29. “Pregnant women. Children. You’re walking past them and there’s nothing you can do help them.”

Philippe is one of thousands of Haitians who have taken a perilous 11-country journey from Brazil to reach the United States.  

Creative Commons

  A new study has found that even while wage increases for women in Miami-Dade outpaced men, women still make less in the workplace.

Courtesy of Natalie Piner

Jaden Piner started acting because his grandma made him do it.

She was preaching at church one Sunday and needed a visual element for her sermon. She tapped the then fifth grader to act out her words on the pulpit.

“She was talking about when you overcome certain struggles,” said Jaden, 13. “So I had a brick in a bag and I had to act like I couldn't pick it up because it was a struggle.”

After that moment, and flattery from parishioners impressed with his performance, Jaden decided he would audition for the drama program at Norland Middle.

At the Give Good Works Thrift Store in Wynwood, a wall facing North Miami Avenue turned for two days into a canvas for people to write or paint their thoughts about Fidel Castro.

Large black letters read, “Fidel, may you rot in hell.”

In a sign posted outside, the store encouraged passers-by to stop and write on the wall. "Ask for a marker inside," it said. 

Someone wrote, "Viva Cuba Libre," and another "Praying for a free Cuba."

Courtesy of Yenesis Alfonso

Yenesis Alfonso felt empty when she found out Fidel Castro had died.

As hundreds of Cuban Americans took to the streets in Miami in pure jubilation banging pots and breaking out in dance, she placed pink flowers beside her father’s cremated remains.  

Nadege Green / WLRN

Edwin Sutton, 29, resigned himself to not voting in what he considers to be the most important election of his lifetime.

He’s from Miami, but currently lives in New York where he works as an actor, singer and drag queen.

Sutton said  his absentee ballot never came in the mail.

“I was just devastated,” said Sutton. “I felt powerless.”

After posting on Facebook about his frustration, a fellow member of The New York City Gay Men's Chorus unexpectedly  bought him a one-day round trip ticket to Miami.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Jasmen Rogers is a Florida voter who begrudgingly voted for Hillary Clinton.

Rogers knew early on that her preferred candidate for president was Green Party candidate Jill Stein, but with Florida being a swing state and ever important in the road to clinching the presidency Rogers considered whether a vote for Stein could lead to a Donald Trump presidency.

Nadege Green / WLRN

On a wall that faces Biscayne Boulevard near Northeast 82nd Street is the latest in Miami political art commentary.

The mural is entitled: “When Pigs Fly.” And the lead pig with white wings looks a lot like Donald Trump.

The piece commissioned by New Florida Majority was unveiled Tuesday  as volunteers handed out cups of Cuban coffee to nearby traffic while urging drivers not to vote for Trump.

Luigi Guarino / Flickr Creative Commons

Plantain. It’s a South Florida food staple. It’s green, it’s starchy and when cooked absolutely delicious.  No arguments there.

But how do you pronounce it?

I was going over a radio script with my editor Tom Hudson and when we got to the word he called it “plan-TAYNE,” rhymes with rain. I said,  “plan-TIN,” like inn.

I’ve always heard it pronounced both ways in Miami, but is there a “right" way?

Lydia Martin

All across Miami-Dade and Broward, construction sites are in various stages of finish and neighbors are worried that as Hurricane Matthew impacts the region, these sites will become safety hazards.

“There’s steel rods, balcony railings, a bunch of things that could be projectiles very easily,” said Elizabeth Schwartz, a Miami attorney who lives next door to condominiums under construction in Edgewater.

“It looks really dangerous,” she said. “I’m very afraid for our home, for our safety, for our neighbors.”

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