Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

In 2016 she was recognized  by the National Association of Black Journalists with three first place awards for investigative reporting, long form and short form radio reporting on policing in Miami-Dade’s black communities. Green’s work has also been honored by the Florida AP Broadcaster Awards. Green previously worked at the Miami Herald covering local city governments and the Haitian community.

She studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Erik Hersman / Flickr Creative Commons

More than 187,000 Miami-Dade County residents are expected to receive their absentee ballots for the Aug. 26 primary election.

The Miami-Dade County Elections Department is reminding voters not to allow just anyone to fill out their ballots.

"Do not allow anyone to mark your ballot unless you are unable to do so because of blindness, disability or failure to read or write," the agency wrote in a press release.

The department also warns voters not to give their absentee ballots to anyone other than a specified designee.

Justin Namon / Courtesy of the Adrienne Arsht Center

Alvin Ailey was one of the most respected choreographers in the history of American dance.

He said: “Dance is for everybody. I believe that the dance came from the people and that it should always be delivered back to the people.”

David Anasagasti vs American Eagle Outfitters Inc

A popular Miami street artist is suing retail giant American Eagle Outfitters for using his murals in a global marketing campaign without compensating or crediting him.

Miami artist David Anasagasti, better known as Ahol Sniffs Glue, claims the retailer  used his artwork to sell its cut-off shorts and surfer T-shirts.

The artwork in question are the droopy eyeball-motif murals Anasagasti painted in Miami’s Wynwood Art District.

Rasmus Bøgeskov Larsen / Flickr Creative Commons

The impact of sea-level rise on South Florida will be the topic of discussion at the Second Annual Sea Level Rise Symposium Friday.

Experts say Florida is ground zero for sea level rise, and the Southeast Florida region will be the most impacted.

Tara Bardi, senior scientist with the Arthur R. Marshall Foundation for the Everglades, says even with increased media coverage on sea-level rise, most people aren’t sure how it will impact them personally.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

In Miami-Dade County, one organization is working to improve the quality of life for residents who live in neighborhoods affected by gang violence.

On Monday, the Miami-Dade Anti-Gang Strategy focused its efforts in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood after a spate of shootings in the past two months left four dead.

Peetje2 / Creative Commons/Flickr

Earlier this week, a municipality in South Florida held a symbolic vote to show support for gay marriage.

That vote failed.

In a 3-to-2 vote, the Village of Miami Shores decided not to support a statewide law that would allow gays to marry anywhere in Florida.

Jesse Walters, vice mayor of Miami Shores, proposed the resolution at a recent council meeting.

"Frankly," he says, "I think it's a black eye for the village, it's an embarrassment. It's a town that has a lot of gay and lesbian people."

wilson.house.gov

  A recent study found black women are underrepresented at all levels of politics — federal, state and local government.

Rutgers Center for American Women and Politics and Higher Heights for America, a national nonprofit that seeks to elevate the voice of black women in politics, conducted the study. The group argues black women face distinct challenges when running for political office and are more like to be discouraged from running than their white counterparts or black men.

WALTER MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Miami's Liberty City community will rally in an anti-violence protest on Saturday. The residents will gather in response to a recent mass shooting that left two dead and five injured.

Since the mass shooting in June, a man riding on his bicycle was shot dead and 67-year-old Pastor Kenneth Johnson was also murdered in the neighborhood. Johnson was attacked by two young men who tried to steal money out of his hand and a gold-plated chain from around his neck.

North Miami’s elections are typically drama-filled.

The upcoming mayoral election, triggered after former mayor Lucie Tondreau was arrested by federal agents and removed from office, is no different.

Three candidates are vying to replace Tondreau: Jean Rodrigue Marcellus, a former city councilman, Kevin Burns, a former two-term mayor and Dr. Smith Joseph, a local physician. All three men are familiar faces to voters; they ran for mayor last election against Tondreau.

Wikipedia

Miami Beach officials are replacing their collection of 29 lifeguard stands.  In their place next year will be bright, whimsical designs by local architect William Lane.

Lane says the new designs will be inspired by six iconic stands he created in the '90s.

"There was a round one, a pink one over on Eighth Street and that one is being rebuilt. It was sort of Jetsonian," he says.

That’s right, it was inspired by the '60s cartoon -- The Jetsons.

Alonzo Mourning mans the pump for the unveiling of the Overtown Youth Center’s STEM program. CW GRIFFIN / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

The Overtown Youth Center is introducing a new STEM curriculum to its summer program, aimed at underserved kids. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and math.

Aerospace company AAR funded the $350,000 program.

In a recent study, The National Science Board found while diversity in the science and engineering fields has improved, African Americans, Hispanics and women remain underrepresented in the workforce. 

Tina Brown, who runs the center, says that’s why they’re introducing this program to the kids this summer.

freedigitalphotos.net

Due to a labor dispute, dozens of Caribbean Airlines pilots called in sick Tuesday, leaving hundreds of passengers stranded.

Nearly all of the Trinidad-based airline's flights were disrupted across the Caribbean and in major hubs such as Miami, New York and London.

Airline spokesman Clint Williams says the company is in touch with travelers affected by the sick-out and has provided alternate flights for them.

ANDREW ULOZA / FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

For six years, Little Haiti residents have been waiting for Emmanuel “Manno” Sanon Soccer Park, known as Little Haiti Soccer Park, to live up to its promise for neighborhood kids.

Many believed the $36.9 million park, built in 2008 and named after a renowned Haitian soccer player, would host a year-round youth soccer program. A newly formed youth soccer league is looking to fill that void.

The only consistent youth sports program at soccer park is a pee-wee American football team, Little Haiti Optimist.

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