Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

In 2016 she was recognized  by the National Association of Black Journalists with three first place awards for investigative reporting, long form and short form radio reporting on policing in Miami-Dade’s black communities. Green’s work has also been honored by the Florida AP Broadcaster Awards. Green previously worked at the Miami Herald covering local city governments and the Haitian community.

She studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

LadyFest

A collective of local artists and activists is encouraging unity among South Florida’s women through an event called LadyFest.

“As women, we are fragmented,” says Charo Valero, one of the event’s organizers. “The mothers, the straight women, women of faith, women of color, immigrants, women that only speak Spanish, we exist as fragmented pieces.”

Walt Michot / Miami Herald

The Miami-Dade County Commission gave preliminary approval Tuesday to add transgender protections to the county’s human rights law.

Last year, Miami-Dade County considered outlawing discrimination against transgender individuals as it already does for other groups.

But the item failed to draw enough support and was withdrawn.

On Tuesday, the commission revisited the issue.  It passed unanimously.

A few members of the public spoke in support of the transgender community. No one spoke in opposition.

ssalonso / Flickr Creative Commons

A two-year-old incident involving photos of people hanging by nooses could cost the City of West Palm Beach $100,000. 

The city commission will consider paying the settlement to three employees who say they were harassed in the workplace.

In 2012, David Fowler, Raymond Johnson and Alden Wilder found photos depicting people with ropes around their necks and people getting beaten.

The photos were found in an envelope on a city truck they used.

Nadege Green / WLRN

To support black-owned businesses, a campaign is creating a shopping curfew for South Floridians on the weekend.

The goal of the #CurfewForChange campaign is to empower black customers to shop at black-owned businesses on Saturdays between 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. -- a curfew to halt shopping at other retailers during these hours.

The City of North Miami

The Internal Revenue Service will be taking a closer look at the City of North Miami’s books this month.

In a letter sent to the city on Sept. 2, the IRS is specifically asking to review employee payroll records and information about eight city vendors from 2012.

Three days after the IRS announced its review, the North Miami finance manager who would have helped coordinate the Service's request resigned.

Camelia Siguineau in her brief resignation letter wrote, “Due to unforeseen family obligations, I am unable to continue my employment with the city.”

Facebook

Hundreds of mourners gathered at Temple Beth Am in Pinecrest to remember Steven Sotloff, the South Florida native who was killed ​b​y militant extremists in Iraq.

​Video of Sotloff's beheading was released earlier this week.

On Friday afternoon,​ ​about 600 friends,​ ​family and complete strangers came together in memory of Sotloff.

"They want to celebrate his life, not just his death," said Robert Hersh, executive director of Temple Beth Am.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Sheila McNeil watched the television newscasts from her Overtown apartment with a deep pain in her gut.

The shooting death of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., hit close to home.

“I know that mom is going through hell right now just trying to understand,” she says.

Three years, ago, her son Travis McNeil was killed by Miami police officer Reynaldo Goyos during a traffic stop.  Travis McNeil was 28. He was not armed.

Mazen Mahdi EPA / Landov

President Obama took time Wednesday to remember Steven Sotloff, the American journalist and South Florida native recently murdered by militants of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS.

During his visit to Estonia, Obama called Sotloff a “devoted and courageous” Middle East correspondent.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The primary election in Miami-Dade County was, for the most part, unremarkable. Voter turn-out was low, and there weren’t many contentious races

But at one North Miami precinct, every election is drama-filled.

Dozens of campaign volunteers lined the sidewalks around the Sunkist Grove Community Center on Northwest 125 Street and 13 Avenue.

They shouted at voters in English and Creole from bullhorns. They sprinted after unsuspecting drivers to shove fliers  into their car windows.  And they aggressively argued with one another over whose candidate will win.

In the quest for votes, candidates often vie for high profile endorsements.

In North Miami, the city has a history of mayoral candidates seeking and receiving endorsements from the son of the most high: Jesus Christ.

On Tuesday, campaign workers for North Miami mayoral candidate Jean Marcellus handed out fliers  to voters with his picture and the word "Jesus" in bold blue print. The flier also had a declaration in French: "Victory in the blood of Jesus."

Marcellus was not immediately available for comment.

Miami FOP Website

Miami’s Fraternal Order of Police union is putting its full support behind Officer Darren Wilson of the Ferguson Police Department.

A recent post on the union’s website reads “We Support Officer Wilson.”

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

North Miami Acting  Mayor Philippe Bien-Aime believes the city may have disregarded its own hiring procedures for city employees.

He points to the recent arrest of the city’s former purchasing director MarcAnthony Tulloch as an example.

Tulloch previously worked for the city of Sunny Isles Beach. Apparently,  Sunny Isles Beach was investigating him for the misuse of a city credit card.

Nadege Green / WLRN

 

Miami Commissioner Marc Sarnoff is asking the city of Miami to account for how much money it has invested in the Liberty City neighborhood since the 1980 Arthur McDuffie race riots.

Liberty City, a neighborhood of about 20,000 residents, is one of Miami's poorer neighborhoods.

Sarnoff says the analysis will provide a clearer picture of what initiatives or programs have been funded in the neighborhood and whether Miami has significantly helped improved Liberty City.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

Hermana Richardson clutches a grey shirt in her hand. She brings it to her face slowly and inhales.

“All I have is the smell of my son,” she says. “This is the last shirt he had on before he walked out of my house.”

Her son Kevin was killed on June 24 in one of the worst mass shootings in Miami’s history.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Historically, Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood has had a dicey relationship with police. It's where the McDuffie race riots erupted in the 1980s.

In recent years, questionable police shootings further complicated community relations. And a prevalent no-snitch culture means few witnesses will cooperate with police.

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