Nadege Green

Reporter

When Nadege Green was a little girl, she would record herself on audio cassette tapes to send to her grandma in Gonaives, Haiti. 

In her English-accented Creole she gave her grandma updates on school, expressed grievances involving her annoying big brother, and other mundane randomness. It was a letter on tape.

That's how she and her family in Haiti communicated back then, when cell phones in Haiti's countryside were unheard of. 

She didn't realize  it at the time, but she was perfecting her public radio voice.

She comes from a print reporter background having covered local governments and politicians behaving badly for the Miami Herald for six years.

At WLRN, Nadege covers social justice issues, the local transgender community and occasionally, dance. 

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

She is a  graduate of Barry University where she majored in English with the hope of someday becoming the next great novelist — she’s still working on that dream.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Miami-Dade Parents of Murdered Kids held a protest outside of the Miami-Dade State Attorney's Office Thursday (Feb. 4).

The parents, frustrated over murder cases that remain unsolved or cases that fall apart, demanded State Attorney Katherine Fernandez-Rundle conduct stronger investigations and enforce longer sentences for violent criminals.

Fernandez-Rundle did not attend the rally, but here is her full statement to WLRN in response to the protest:

Nadege Green / WLRN

About three dozen people protested Thursday outside the Miami-Dade State Attorney Office asking for stronger investigations and longer sentences for people who commit murders.

Miami-Dade Parents of Murdered Kids, led by activist Tangela Sears, say they are sending a message to Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Fernandez-Rundle.

“We want justice,” said Sears, who has been a longtime Fernandez-Rundle supporter.

Fernandez-Rundle did not make an appearance at the rally. No one from her staff commented publicly at the rally. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

Dance icon Arthur Mitchell is sitting in the dance studio at Dr. Michael Krop High School in Northeast Miami-Dade.

He’s 81 years old. And even seated, he has the presence of a dancer.

Head high. Chest out. Back straight.  

Ruth Wiesen, director of the Thomas Armour Youth Ballet, is reading excerpts of his lengthy biography to about two dozen students.

Wiesen, who helped organize Mitchell’s trip to Miami, tells the students that he was the first black principal dancer with the New York City Ballet in 1955.

Carle Juste / Miami Herald

“My son name is Herbert Henderson. He was murdered on Nov. 7, 2012,” says Mary Henderson.

“My son was killed Sept. 10, 2015,"  says Neikole Hunt, her pain, still fresh, makes her voice crack. "His name is Randall Robinson.”

These moms belong to a group that calls itself Miami-Dade Parents of Murdered Kids.

They meet every month in the new North District county police station and they all share the same tragic story: They lost their children to gun violence.

The parents are focused on making changes to a system they say is broken.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The Village of El Portal violated a state law when it failed to study whether adequate housing was available for residents of a mobile home park it plans to shut down.

In an opinion from the state Third District Court of Appeal, the court found that  the village took official action to close the Little Farm mobile home park when it approved a settlement agreement with the property’ owner,  Wealthy Delight LLC.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The Chapman Partnership houses 500 people at its homeless shelter in downtown Miami.

In recent days, several clients living at the shelter have come forward to complain about what they call a prolific bed bug infestation.

Yoanne Eduardo, a resident at the shelter, rolled up her jeans to reveal three large red bumps on her right leg. She also has similar bumps on her back.

“I have marks all over my body,” she said. “I got them since I been there. It’s constantly itching.”

Eduardo lives at the shelter with her 9-year-old son and month-old baby.

Nadege Green / WLRN

It's YoungArts Week in Miami.

That means young artists from across  the country (dancers, writers, singers, filmmakers, visual artists and more) are in town  performing and exhibiting their work. In between, they get the opportunity to take master classes and workshops with leading artists in their fields. The events are taking place at the YoungArts Campus and the New World Center. 

Tim Padgett / WLRN

Ana Marrero pulls back her shirt sleeve and holds out her left arm.

“Look, in Cuban prisons I tried on various occasions to kill myself with knives,” she says.

She counts the succession of healed scars on her forearm. They look like horizontal tally marks.

“Uno, dos, tres, quarto, cinco, seis, siete, ocho,” she counts in Spanish.

Eight times.

These days, it’s a lot easier to travel between the U.S. and Cuba, but some Cubans have no interest in going back to their homeland.

Nadege Green

Miami’s Police Chief is encouraging officers to engage with the communities they patrol beyond arrests and traditional law enforcement actions.

Daniel Mocombe is a neighborhood resources officer in Liberty City doing just that. When he's not answering emergency calls, he's building relationships in the community.

His approach to the job comes from his own negative experience with a police officer when he was a teen.  This is what the job boils down to for him: "People just want to be treated like human beings."

SWOP

They will sing songs, recite poetry and read the names of sex workers who have been killed this year.

All across the country, different events will take place on Thursday (Dec. 17), to commemorate International Day to End Violence against Sex Workers.

In Fort Lauderdale, the newly formed chapter of Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP-USA) is hosting a one-mile awareness march.

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