Nadege Green

Reporter

Nadege Green comes from a print reporter background having covered local governments and politicians for the Miami Herald for six years.

At WLRN, Nadege covers social justice issues, the local transgender community and occasionally, dance. 

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

She is a  graduate of Barry University where she majored in English with the hope of someday becoming the next great novelist — she’s still working on that dream.

Courtesy of Natalie Piner

Jaden Piner started acting because his grandma made him do it.

She was preaching at church one Sunday and needed a visual element for her sermon. She tapped the then fifth grader to act out her words on the pulpit.

“She was talking about when you overcome certain struggles,” said Jaden, 13. “So I had a brick in a bag and I had to act like I couldn't pick it up because it was a struggle.”

After that moment, and flattery from parishioners impressed with his performance, Jaden decided he would audition for the drama program at Norland Middle.

At the Give Good Works Thrift Store in Wynwood, a wall facing North Miami Avenue turned for two days into a canvas for people to write or paint their thoughts about Fidel Castro.

Large black letters read, “Fidel, may you rot in hell.”

In a sign posted outside, the store encouraged passers-by to stop and write on the wall. "Ask for a marker inside," it said. 

Someone wrote, "Viva Cuba Libre," and another "Praying for a free Cuba."

Courtesy of Yenesis Alfonso

Yenesis Alfonso felt empty when she found out Fidel Castro had died.

As hundreds of Cuban Americans took to the streets in Miami in pure jubilation banging pots and breaking out in dance, she placed pink flowers beside her father’s cremated remains.  

Nadege Green / WLRN

Edwin Sutton, 29, resigned himself to not voting in what he considers to be the most important election of his lifetime.

He’s from Miami, but currently lives in New York where he works as an actor, singer and drag queen.

Sutton said  his absentee ballot never came in the mail.

“I was just devastated,” said Sutton. “I felt powerless.”

After posting on Facebook about his frustration, a fellow member of The New York City Gay Men's Chorus unexpectedly  bought him a one-day round trip ticket to Miami.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Jasmen Rogers is a Florida voter who begrudgingly voted for Hillary Clinton.

Rogers knew early on that her preferred candidate for president was Green Party candidate Jill Stein, but with Florida being a swing state and ever important in the road to clinching the presidency Rogers considered whether a vote for Stein could lead to a Donald Trump presidency.

Nadege Green / WLRN

On a wall that faces Biscayne Boulevard near Northeast 82nd Street is the latest in Miami political art commentary.

The mural is entitled: “When Pigs Fly.” And the lead pig with white wings looks a lot like Donald Trump.

The piece commissioned by New Florida Majority was unveiled Tuesday  as volunteers handed out cups of Cuban coffee to nearby traffic while urging drivers not to vote for Trump.

Luigi Guarino / Flickr Creative Commons

Plantain. It’s a South Florida food staple. It’s green, it’s starchy and when cooked absolutely delicious.  No arguments there.

But how do you pronounce it?

I was going over a radio script with my editor Tom Hudson and when we got to the word he called it “plan-TAYNE,” rhymes with rain. I said,  “plan-TIN,” like inn.

I’ve always heard it pronounced both ways in Miami, but is there a “right" way?

Lydia Martin

All across Miami-Dade and Broward, construction sites are in various stages of finish and neighbors are worried that as Hurricane Matthew impacts the region, these sites will become safety hazards.

“There’s steel rods, balcony railings, a bunch of things that could be projectiles very easily,” said Elizabeth Schwartz, a Miami attorney who lives next door to condominiums under construction in Edgewater.

“It looks really dangerous,” she said. “I’m very afraid for our home, for our safety, for our neighbors.”

Larry Miller / Flickr Creative Commons

Most major education institutions in South Florida announced closures in advance of  Hurricane Matthew's expected impact  on South Florida

Miami-Dade and Broward County Public Schools will be closed Thursday and Friday. Broward College announced the same. But as of Wednesday morning, Miami Dade College students were still waiting to find out if they would have classes. 

Students took to social media imploring the school to please close. 

Screenshot YouTube

Weather Channel Meteorologist Jen Delgado is facing sharp criticism and some are asking for her to be fired after she blamed Haiti's deforestation in part to hungry children eating trees. 

In a weather report as Hurricane Matthew prepared to make landfall in Haiti,  Delgado noted that Haiti suffers from a deforestation problem.

"They take all the trees down, they burn the trees," and she continued with a curious claim, "Even the kids there, they're so hungry, they actually eat the trees."

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WLRN is looking at the impact of children and teens killed by guns in Miami-Dade County through the voices of some of the people who are most affected.

Tequila Forshee was 12 years old when she was killed inside her grandmother's Miami Gardens home on Aug. 14, 2013.

Bullets ripped through the living room walls and windows striking Tequila as she was getting her hair braided.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The photo captures a grief-stricken mother at her 8-year old daughter’s grave site-- a little girl felled by a bullet in North Miami-Dade.

Rosalind Brown is lying down on the freshly planted grass clutching a blanket near Jada Page’s temporary grave marker.

Courstesy Lori Hadley-Davis / WLRN

Jada Page was shot in the head  in a drive-by shooting on August 28.  Two days later, she died from her injuries in the hospital. She was 8 years old.

The little girl who loved to dance and was the life of family gatherings was not the intended target.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Olympic gold medalist Brianna Rollins returned to Miami Northwestern Senior High where as a young freshman she got her first introduction to track & field.

She was showered with plaques, certificates and a proclamation that Sept. 15 will forever be known as Brianna Rollins Day. 

The admittedly shy athlete sported a white USA jersey and around her neck, her gold medal.

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