Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

Her work was received numerous awards, including a 2017 Regional Edward R. Murrow Award (Planning Funerals For Children Lost To Gun Violence), 2016 first place investigative reporting award from the National Association of Black Journalists and Florida AP Broadcaster awards.

In 2018 Green was recognized by the Miami Foundation with the Ruth Shack Leadership award for her body of work that gives voice to communities that are often not heard.

Green's reporting has appeared in the Miami Herald, NPR and PRI. Her work has also been cited in Teen Vogue, The Root, Refinery 29 and the Washington Post.

She previously worked at the Miami Herald covering city governments and the Haitian community. Green studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Follow her on Twitter @nadegegreen

Siggi Bachmann / New World Symphony

American orchestras are overwhelmingly white. Black and Latino musicians make up less than five percent of orchestra members, according to the Sphinx Organization, which works to increase diversity in the arts.

And the National Alliance for Audition Support—a collaboration between Sphinx, New World Symphony and the League of American Orchestras—wants to change that. 

Miami Herald

Former Palm Beach Gardens Officer Nouman Raja tried to use Florida's "stand your ground" law to have manslaughter and attempted murder charges against him dismissed. Raja shot and killed  Corey Jones, 31, whose car was stranded on the side of the road.

On Friday, Circuit Judge Samantha Schosberg Feuer denied the motion to dismiss.

Pixabay

Florida was the first state to enact a "stand your ground" law. Under the law, a person is allowed to use lethal force — and has no duty to retreat — if they believe they are in danger.

Since it was enacted in 2005, the law has drawn high-profile controversies, including the shooting of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

Harvard professor Caroline Light was recently in Miami to talk about the law’s historical roots and her book “Stand Your Ground: A History of America's Love Affair with Lethal Self-Defense.”

Nadege Green / WLRN

Rollin Virgile walks through his Little Haiti store amid dozens of weddings dresses, white floral crowns, men’s tuxedo vests and baptism gowns. He greets customers in Creole: "Bonswa, koman nou ye?" (Good afternoon, how are you all?) 

Miami-Dade Bar Association

The Dade County Bar Association's Young Lawyers Section held an essay contest for students to discuss their experiences with gun violence and to offer up possible solutions.

Students from across Miami-Dade wrote about hearing gun shots outside of their homes, the lack of resources for neighborhoods plagued by gun violence and the need for more counselors to address youth trauma.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Immediately after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting, counselors and therapists were available in local parks.  But since that public showing of mental health support, students and their families continue to struggle with the trauma of what happened.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

President Donald Trump visited South Florida Monday and heard Cuban-American business owners heap praise on him for his $1.5 trillion tax cut package.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Survivors of gun violence from across Miami-Dade gathered at the Sherdavia Jenkins Peace Park  Saturday to share their experiences.

Miami Herald

Hundreds of Miami Northwestern students walked out of class on Tuesday — a day after an on-campus tribute was held in memory of 17-year-old Kimson Green, who was shot and killed at a Liberty Square Housing Project on Sunday.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The students at Miami Northwestern High School  left their morning classes for an outdoor tribute in memory of Kimson Green, a sophomore at the school who was killed in the Liberty Square Housing project Sunday.

Nadege Green

At Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School’s Black History Month Show, a student walked out on stage to read a one-page statement defending the Black Lives Matter movement.

This part of the show was not rehearsed ahead of time, it was a last-minute decision by some of the black student organizers to respond to a letter that ran in the school’s paper. 

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