Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

In 2016 she was recognized  by the National Association of Black Journalists with three first place awards for investigative reporting, long form and short form radio reporting on policing in Miami-Dade’s black communities. Green’s work has also been honored by the Florida AP Broadcaster Awards. Green previously worked at the Miami Herald covering local city governments and the Haitian community.

She studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Latoya Williams was concerned about her first paycheck after Hurricane Irma.

She couldn’t go to work for seven days because the early childcare center where she teaches was closed because of the storm and its after-effects.

“Whatever I make is what I make,” said Williams. “I have no supplemental income. It really would have been hard and tight."

Like most hourly employees, Williams doesn’t get paid if she doesn’t show up to work— even if the reason is an act of nature. The economic impact of Irma could have a devastating affect on individuals who work hourly jobs.

Video Screenshot

Earlier this year, two of Trinidad and Tobago's  soca superstars teamed up for the Carnival single “Buss Head,” and now they’re teaming up again in Miami —this time for a philanthropic cause.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Laura Everette didn’t know what to do after Hurricane Irma knocked a tree onto her minivan.

Everette, 57, is a double amputee and she lives on a fixed income.

Tree removal and clean-up can be expensive with costs ranging from the hundreds to thousands of dollars. As homeowners and renters across South Florida continue to deal with the aftermath of Irma, that means figuring out what to do with toppled trees on private property.

Everette, a renter, tried calling her landlord but didn’t get a response.

Nadege Green

Guillermo Porras couldn’t get in touch with his doctor for a week after Hurricane Irma.  His cell phone service was spotty after the storm and he was running low on his prescriptions.

“It’s been very difficult after the hurricane,” he said.

Even if he could get through, Porras would have found the South Miami Health Center that he visits was closed because of the extended power outage that affected much of South Florida.

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A Coconut Grove neighbor turned to the popular Nextdoor app to warn fellow residents about “suspicious activity” days after Hurricane Irma knocked down trees and left parts of the neighborhood without electricity.

The activity the poster saw:  Three African-American young men riding bicycles.

In the Crime and Safety section, the poster wrote, he approached the young men and told them, “We are here.”

One neighbor replied,  “Not helpful to racially profile people. Greet and ask if they need assistance before assuming they are criminals.”

Courtesy of Arnetta Gordon

Arnetta Gordon is a Miami-Dade public school teacher.  After leaving Miami to escape Hurricane Irma with her husband and four children, she returned to her Liberty City home which like thousands of others had no electricity.  Gordon has a 9-month old infant who she breastfeeds.

She wrote WLRN about the challenges of breastfeeding with no power:

C. M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

From South Miami-Dade to Miami Gardens community groups and government officials are feeding people who might still be without power after Hurricane Irma. 

Read more: After Hurricane Irma, Food Insecurity In Miami-Dade's Poorest Communities

WLRN compiled a list of  free community meals being served on Friday, Sept 15. Many of the groups hosting are also seeking volunteers and donations. 

Florida City

David Santiago / El Nuevo Herald

Miami Dade County Public Schools will hand out thousands of free meals to families on Thursday.

“In the wake of Hurricane Irma, many in our community are struggling to meet basic needs,” the district wrote in a press release.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Days after Hurricane Irma battered South Florida, Rufus James walked through his Liberty City neighborhood in Miami looking for paid work to chop down trees and clean up yards.

Like many Floridians, James, 57, was going on day four with no electricity. At home, he had three grandchildren to feed. They’re eating “cornflakes and whatever we can come up with. I’m looking for some food,” he said.

Before the storm, James said he worked odd jobs — helping elderly neighbors mow their lawns or move heavy items. Post storm, no one was paying for help yet.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Guided only by the red glow emanating  from emergency exit signs and his cell phone's flashlight, Gerald Tinker,  navigates up and down the stairwell of his apartment building.

Tinker, 67, said the Gibson Plaza Apartments in Coconut Grove have been without electricity since Saturday, nearly four days.  Residents at the  mixed-income complex for people over 62,  said they were told a backup generator would kick in should the power go out. Tinker said it's one of the reasons the apartments were appealing to him and many others when they were searching for a home. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

In Miami’s Overtown community, some families are receiving conflicting reports about the nearest shelter they could go to.

At the New Arena Court apartments tenants had hurricane-warning letters posted on their doors from the building’s management. For people who wanted to go to a shelter it directed them to Booker T. Washington High School, a “short walk from your building.”

Joey Flechas / Miami Herald

Eugene Johnson purchased two loaves of bread and batteries for his flashlight. Those are his supplies in preparation for Hurricane Irma.

“I’m on fixed income,” said Johnson. “This hit me out of the blue. I had to pay my rent, my electricity bill and stuff like that.”

In his kitchen cabinet he already had a few cans of tuna and he plans to boils some eggs.

Johnson, 65, lives in an affordable housing complex in Miami and, like many of his neighbors who are also on fixed or limited income, he doesn’t own a car.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Earlier this year, Octavia Yearwood was talking with her good friend Najja Moon about how hard it is to meet other lesbian women in South Florida.

“I was sitting on a stool, she was sitting on a swing chair and we were like,  'Yo, for real, where are all the lesbians in Miami?' "

Moon didn’t quite have the answer, but she wanted to explore how to make those connections. Together, the women launched Lunchbox Miami, a monthly meet-up for lesbian, bisexual and queer women.

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Population Survey

Low-wage jobs in Florida are one of the main reasons families live in poverty or near poverty, according to a new study by Florida International University.

The yearly report, “State of Working Florida,” found Florida’s economy to be unbalanced and unequal.

While unemployment numbers are down statewide, that has not made a dent in income disparity across the state.

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