Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

In 2016 she was recognized  by the National Association of Black Journalists with three first place awards for investigative reporting, long form and short form radio reporting on policing in Miami-Dade’s black communities. Green’s work has also been honored by the Florida AP Broadcaster Awards. Green previously worked at the Miami Herald covering local city governments and the Haitian community.

She studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

President Donald Trump visited South Florida Monday and heard Cuban-American business owners heap praise on him for his $1.5 trillion tax cut package.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Survivors of gun violence from across Miami-Dade gathered at the Sherdavia Jenkins Peace Park  Saturday to share their experiences.

Miami Herald

Hundreds of Miami Northwestern students walked out of class on Tuesday — a day after an on-campus tribute was held in memory of 17-year-old Kimson Green, who was shot and killed at a Liberty Square Housing Project on Sunday.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The students at Miami Northwestern High School  left their morning classes for an outdoor tribute in memory of Kimson Green, a sophomore at the school who was killed in the Liberty Square Housing project Sunday.

Nadege Green

At Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School’s Black History Month Show, a student walked out on stage to read a one-page statement defending the Black Lives Matter movement.

This part of the show was not rehearsed ahead of time, it was a last-minute decision by some of the black student organizers to respond to a letter that ran in the school’s paper. 

Symone Titania Major

"The Unvoiced Community: Barbecue Men and Women of Goulds" is a photo exhibit that explores barbecue culture in the streets of South Miami-Dade County. The exhibit celebrates local entrepreneurs who set up in parking lots and street corners selling smoked meats late into the evening hours.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

Demanding change and promising their generation would make it happen, students walked out of schools across South Florida and the country on Wednesday — one month after 17 students and teachers died in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

WLRN News

Exactly one month after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, students across South Florida and the rest of the country walked out of their classrooms  to protest gun violence. 

Associated Press

Students from across the country are planning to participate in a coordinated national walkout on Wednesday in response to the high school shooting in Parkland.

Rachel Neville / Dance Theatre of Harlem

Long before I considered journalism as a career, I was an aspiring ballet dancer.

And although I started training in ballet late for the dance world—I was 14 when I took my first ballet class at the Thomas Armour Youth Ballet in South Miami— I was a quick study.

I was in my second year in the dance magnet program at Miami Northwestern High School when Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH) came to Miami - not to perform but to audition dancers for its summer intensive program in New York,

Patrick Farrell / WLRN

Mount Calvary Missionary Baptist Church is sandwiched between a police station and a housing project in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood. Dozens of families over the years have filed into the church’s sanctuary to say tear-filled goodbyes to children and teens killed by gun violence.

Emilee McGovern / WLRN News

A few days after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, 16-year-old Aiden Edrich carried a bouquet of hydrangeas from Publix, still wrapped in plastic. He walked over to a makeshift memorial of teddy bears and crosses.

“For all the victims, all 17 victims," he said. "It's just to show our respect to the community." 

His parents brought him and his sister to the memorial just down the street from the high school.

Nadege Green and Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

In South Florida, it's happened before -- young people rallying and raising their voices against gun violence.

About a dozen elementary school kids took to the streets inside the Liberty Square housing projects in April 2016 chanting, " We don't want to die; stop shooting. We don't want to die; stop shooting."

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