Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

In 2016 she was recognized  by the National Association of Black Journalists with three first place awards for investigative reporting, long form and short form radio reporting on policing in Miami-Dade’s black communities. Green’s work has also been honored by the Florida AP Broadcaster Awards. Green previously worked at the Miami Herald covering local city governments and the Haitian community.

She studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Nadege Green / WLRN News

Honor them with action.

It’s a rallying cry in the LGBTQ community one year after the Pulse Night Club tragedy, one of the worst mass shootings in U.S. history.

Rowan Moore Gerety

A new U.M. student-led research group hopes to start doing the type of analysis and research that simply does not yet exist in Miami-Dade when it comes to understanding the causes and networks around gun violence from a public health perspective.

The new Gun Violence Research Advocacy Program hosted a discussion on Thursday along with trauma surgeons and local gun violence survivors.

“Night after night, it gets tiring and frustrating and overwhelming to meet survivors of gun violence,” said Dr. Rishi Rattan, a trauma surgeon.

Nadege Green / WLRN

A group of students at Miami Norland Senior High in Miami Gardens spent part of their freshman year writing about their lives in poems and short stories.

The loss of a parent, struggling with low self-esteem, racism and homelessness are among the central themes in the narratives they penned about themselves.

Now sophomores, some of their works are collected in a new self-published book, “iRead, iThink, iWrite.”

Nadege Green / WLRN

Clarence Dickson was the first black graduate of the City of Miami's police academy and he rose to become Miami’s first black police chief in 1985.

Steve Snodgrass / flickr

Florida Sen. Frank Artiles, a Republican, resigned last month after the Miami Herald revealed he had said the n-word and called a fellow senator, Audrey Gibson, a “bitch”.

Artiles also referred to Gibson, a black woman, as “girl.”

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Nadege Green / WLRN

Michael Brun grew up in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. As a kid, he remembers the pulsing and intoxicating rhythms that washed over the neighborhood every weekend in the form of rara bands--musicians beating drums, blowing handmade horns, clapping and singing through the streets.

Geo-demographics of gunshot wound injuries in Miami-Dade county, 2002–2012

Matias Ocner / WLRN

A week after Louissita Chery brought her newborn baby home, he started to have trouble breathing. She rushed him to the hospital where he would remain for a month with respiratory problems.

Courtesy Dance Now! Miami

Dance Now! Miami’s latest dance piece is a direct response to President Donald Trump.

“Bridges Not Walls” was conceived during the presidential race when the then-presidential candidate Trump repeatedly declared that he would build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“When Donald Trump came up and made those comments about immigrants, specifically coming from Mexico, we were at that time in the process of creating a collaboration with a Mexican [dance] company and so we thought that that was the moment to respond,” said Dance Now Co-Director  Diego Salterini.

Instagram Dee Conchman

Derrick Prater is "Dee Conchman." Every day he sets up in various parts of Miami hawking his specialty: conch.

 

Nadege Green / WLRN

Felecia Hatcher and Derick Pearson started their nonprofit Code Fever Miami three years ago.

The husband and wife duo wanted to use their background in math, science and marketing to support entrepreneurs of color in South Florida and to connect them to the start-up and tech scene.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Jacoria Adams reads her homework aloud:

“Dream, dream and believe. Dream, believe and dance to the beat.”

Her poem is inspired by Alvin Ailey’s dance, “Night Creature.” 

Nadege Green / WLRN

A group of 12 young black professionals in Miami-Dade formed the Miami Millennial Investment Firm just over a year ago.

Its mission: Get black people to invest in Miami-Dade’s black communities.

A national organization that promotes and supports black men leaders is awarding $250,000 in grants in Miami and three other cities.

BMe Community  is looking to give away  $10,000 to 25 black men changemakers in Miami, Akron, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. 

Benjamin Evans, the Miami community manager for BMe, says this is just one way to highlight black male excellence and to connect local leaders to a national network of like-minded individuals.

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