Mary Shedden

Mary Shedden is news director at WUSF.

Since arriving at WUSF in 2013, she has worked as a reporter and as editor of the Health News Florida journalism collaborative.

At WUSF and Health News Florida, Mary has been part of winning numerous awards, including a 2016 national Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio and Television Digital News Association. Her work also has been honored by the Florida Associated Press Broadcasters, and state and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

During her nearly 20 years at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun, she covered everything from the investigation of a serial killer to retired pro athletes in chronic pain, winning honors from SPJ, the Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Mary has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Mary at 813-974-8636, on twitter @MaryShedden or by email at shedden@wusf.org.

O.J. Simpson is set to be released from a Nevada prison next week. And Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is trying to stop the celebrity-turned convicted robber from moving here.

It’s been nearly a week since Hurricane Harvey reached the Texas coast and news from the devastation continues to consume the news cycle and our social media feeds.

But one thing that’s clear is that the dramatic way the flooding is unfolding -- and how people around Houston are communicating with one another - is completely changing the way we’re seeing and hearing the stories of natural disasters.

After more than four decades as a journalist, Health News Florida’s founder and former editor Carol Gentry is retiring from WUSF Public Media.

Last week, a colorful rant by the short-lived White House Communications Director left media across the country and world scrambling to figure out what to do with some pretty vulgar words.

It’s been a year since 49 people died in a mass shooting at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando.

It happened in a city best known as a wholesome family vacation destination, but one that has also unofficially been host for the past 25 years to Disney’s Gay Days. That event attracts about 150,000 people a year to local attractions, hotels, restaurants and clubs.

These days, the barrage of news coming from Washington DC includes a lot that's being leaked to the media via anonymous sources. President Donald Trump and a number of lawmakers are saying the leaks are not just dangerous - they're illegal.

And now, there's been an arrest.

Facebook’s the primary news gateway for a lot of Americans. And while most people on it know it's a haven for fake news, we may be getting gamed by those sites more than we realize.

No one wants to be arrested. But fact is it happens every day - to people who deserve it - and some who are just good folk caught up in a bad situation.

While people in that latter category may see the charges against them dropped, they’ll still have a memento of their night in jail: a mugshot automatically published on the internet for the entire world to see.

As of today, there’s a new President of the United States. And the new Commander in Chief’s already testy relationship with the news media means it’s pretty clear that the press will never be the same.

The hottest gadget this holiday season is getting attention it may not want.

Amazon's Echo is a voice- activated smart speaker that in a soothing – yet somewhat robotic way - plays music, shares the news and weather and answers even the most inane questions when anyone near the device says a key word - usually the name 'Alexa.'

There’s an interesting term popping up in media reports lately: dog whistle.

It's a metaphor for talking in a way that a small group of people hear one that is hidden below the surface message, said Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies.

If you've been paying attention lately, there's been a lot of talk about how many media organizations relied a little too much on flawed polling and survey data in predicting outcomes.

With that in mind, we're still going to throw caution to the wind and look at some new data that helps break down how Americans seem so divided.

Thinking of memorializing your vote for the upcoming presidential election? You might want to think twice about that.

Florida is one of 18 states where it's illegal to take a selfie with your mail-in ballot or while you're in the voting booth.

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign may consider Hillary Clinton to be public enemy number one. But the media – and the reporters covering the GOP candidate – are close behind. Take for example, his description of journalists just a few days ago in Tampa.  

“These people are among the most dishonest in the world – the media,” Trump said to a roaring crowd. “They are the worst. They’re trying to fix the election for crooked Hillary.”

Health News Florida

Consumers skeptical about the real cost of health care will soon have a resource where they can ask and share with their neighbors the price of common medical procedures.

Health News Florida in April will be launching PriceCheck, a database that blends together prices we’ve collected with information from consumers living in South Florida and the Tampa Bay area.

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