Mary Shedden

Mary Shedden is news director at WUSF.

Since arriving at WUSF in 2013, she has worked as a reporter and as editor of the Health News Florida journalism collaborative.

In the past 20 years, she's told the stories of retired pro athletes in chronic pain, children poisoned by toxic toys, and seniors who nearly overdosed on prescription drugs. 

Her work at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun have been honored by professional organizations including the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Shedden has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Shedden at 813-974-8636, on twitter @MaryShedden or by email.

Facebook’s the primary news gateway for a lot of Americans. And while most people on it know it's a haven for fake news, we may be getting gamed by those sites more than we realize.

No one wants to be arrested. But fact is it happens every day - to people who deserve it - and some who are just good folk caught up in a bad situation.

While people in that latter category may see the charges against them dropped, they’ll still have a memento of their night in jail: a mugshot automatically published on the internet for the entire world to see.

As of today, there’s a new President of the United States. And the new Commander in Chief’s already testy relationship with the news media means it’s pretty clear that the press will never be the same.

The hottest gadget this holiday season is getting attention it may not want.

Amazon's Echo is a voice- activated smart speaker that in a soothing – yet somewhat robotic way - plays music, shares the news and weather and answers even the most inane questions when anyone near the device says a key word - usually the name 'Alexa.'

There’s an interesting term popping up in media reports lately: dog whistle.

It's a metaphor for talking in a way that a small group of people hear one that is hidden below the surface message, said Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies.

If you've been paying attention lately, there's been a lot of talk about how many media organizations relied a little too much on flawed polling and survey data in predicting outcomes.

With that in mind, we're still going to throw caution to the wind and look at some new data that helps break down how Americans seem so divided.

Thinking of memorializing your vote for the upcoming presidential election? You might want to think twice about that.

Florida is one of 18 states where it's illegal to take a selfie with your mail-in ballot or while you're in the voting booth.

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign may consider Hillary Clinton to be public enemy number one. But the media – and the reporters covering the GOP candidate – are close behind. Take for example, his description of journalists just a few days ago in Tampa.  

“These people are among the most dishonest in the world – the media,” Trump said to a roaring crowd. “They are the worst. They’re trying to fix the election for crooked Hillary.”

Health News Florida

Consumers skeptical about the real cost of health care will soon have a resource where they can ask and share with their neighbors the price of common medical procedures.

Health News Florida in April will be launching PriceCheck, a database that blends together prices we’ve collected with information from consumers living in South Florida and the Tampa Bay area.

The deadline to get health insurance under Obamacare for the start of 2016 is less than two weeks away, and Floridians are by far the largest group of consumers signing up for plans.

  With the third year of open enrollment under way on Healthcare.gov, President Barack Obama is focusing his efforts on people eligible to buy policies on the insurance marketplace.

Political battles over expanding Medicaid in states including Florida are important, but not as easy to win, he told WUSF in an Oval Office interview Thursday.

Health care has been a hot-button policy issue for years in the Florida Legislature, and it’s starting to look like the session scheduled to start on Jan. 12 will be no different.

Everyone thinks HIV happens to someone else.

It only infects men who are having sex with men, they say. Or HIV drug users.

And while that still accounts for about half of all people infected, those who are being diagnosed with this serious sexually transmitted disease don’t fall into simple categories. They’re young and old, straight, gay and transgender, of every race.

Retired surgeon West Palm Beach resident Ben Carson declared his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination Monday, resting his longshot bid on his vision of the nation as "a place of dreams" where people can thrive when freed from an overbearing government.

Carson, the only African-American in the race, spoke in front of hundreds of people at Detroit Music Hall, a few miles from a high school that bears his name. A choir singing the chorus from Eminem's "Lose Yourself" set the stage.

It was 1964. The New York World's Fair.

And a young Tony Napolitano saw his first video phone at the Bell Telephone pavilion. The boy marveled that people could connect visually from remote locations.

Fast forward to 2015. Napolitano, now a pediatric neonatologist, is about to make this connection an ordinary part of practicing medicine at All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg.

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