Marva Hinton

Morning producer

Marva Hinton is originally from North Carolina. She works as a reporter and fill-in anchor for WLRN. 

Before coming to WLRN, she spent several years working as a radio news reporter and anchor in Orlando. During her stint there she covered everything from shuttle launches to the foreclosure crisis and the Casey Anthony trial.

Prior to that, Marva worked in radio news in Raleigh, North Carolina and Radford, Virginia. She began her career as a radio news producer in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Marva has an MFA in creative writing from Antioch University Los Angeles. She also holds a BA in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she completed a double major in political science. 

In her spare time, she enjoys playing the pan flute and teaching her cats to do tricks.

Marva is married and lives in Miami.

Ways To Connect

Marva Hinton / WLRN

The fall term begins Monday at Miami Dade College, and students on one campus will be able to take advantage of a special program to make sure their basic needs are met before classes start.

The college's north campus is teaming up with Farm Share, a nonprofit in Homestead that provides food to the needy, to give students free produce. The school also has a food pantry on campus where students can pick up non-perishable food items.

Marsha Halper / Miami Herald Staff

This weekend the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science in Coconut Grove will be hosting its last Scientist Sunday at its current location before moving to its new home in downtown Miami next year.

The events are held on the first Sunday of each month and feature scientists who are doing research in the community through the museum's Science Communication Fellows Program.

For the past three years, public health activists have been trying to convince Florida lawmakers to support a needle-exchange program to fight the HIV epidemic in South Florida, and for the past three years they’ve been turned down.

One Miami activist refuses to wait for lawmakers. George Gibson is an ordained minister. Nearly everyone calls him Elder as in a church elder.

He says his needle-exchange program is related to his religious work.

“I see it as being an AIDS ministry,” he said.

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Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

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