Luis Hernandez

Morning anchor

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

Courtesy Knight Foundation

Miami Arts Week started with good news for the whole region, with the announcements of the winners of the 2016 Knights Arts Challenge. 

The contest, sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, will give $2.78 million to 44 local  artists and projects aimed at exploring the authentic voices of South Florida and bringing art to neighborhoods from Key West to Palm Beach. All winners have committed to find funds to match Knight's commitment (it's one of the conditions of the grant). 

Miami Herald

It wasn't pretty, but it was dramatic. The Miami Dolphins waited until the final five minutes of the game in Los Angeles to pull out the improbable victory. It was, dare I say, Tebow-esk. 

Now the Fins sit on a five-game winning streak and in second place in the AFC East. Don't worry, Patriots fans, we're not feeling that cocky that we think we'll catch you (though anything can happen). And all that talk six weeks ago about benching quarterback Ryan Tannehill, or trading players, or dismantling the team, is in the rearview mirror...for now.

Copy Arcadia Publishing / Miami Herald

Gregory Bush has been involved in studying and looking into the best ways south Floridians can move forward with plans for better management of public spaces in Virginia Key. He looked at the history of the region and how Miami has struggled with the best course for it in his new book, "White Sand, Black Beach." He will be discussing his work at this year's Miami Book Fair. I asked him where he found inspiration for this project.

Andrew Kaufman

Andrew Kaufman has written a trilogy of art books that have a massive collection of his photographs of the street art in Wynwood. He will be presenting a special - Writer's Bench - program at the Miami Book Fair on Sunday at 2:30 PM. I recently spoke with him about what inspired him to produce three books on the subject of Wynwood Street Art.

El Nuevo Herald

There has been a lot of talk of "rigged elections" or "voter fraud" circulating within the electorate in this election Nevertheless, as of today (Monday, Nov. 4) the number of Floridians who have already voted is more than five million.

Christina White, the Supervisor of Elections in Miami-Dade County, says there is no need for fear of voter fraud because the system is built to protect against it. She shares her thoughts on why voters can feel secure, as well as what people can expect on Election Day.

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